182005 Social Silicon Valleys - The Young Foundation

Baring Foundation who have supported Launchpad, as well as Cisco, the ..... Business innovation and social innovation: similarities and differences. .... new technologies like the car, electricity or the internet, depended as much on .... was judged by Harvard's Daniel Bell the world's 'most successful entrepreneur of social.
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182005 Social Silicon Valleys

3/24/06

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Social Silicon Valleys Social innovations – new ideas that work to meet pressing unmet needs - are all around us. Examples include distance learning, patient-led healthcare, fair trade, Wikipedia and restorative justice. Many social innovations (from the Open University to laws against age discrimination) were successfully promoted by the Young Foundation in its previous incarnations.

Huge energies - and resources - are devoted to innovation in science and technology. But far less attention has been paid to social innovation. This manifesto examines how social innovation happens in NGOs, the public sector, movements and markets. It looks at the history of great social innovators – from Robert Owen to Wangari Maathai – and at the roles played by social movements, governments, businesses and NGOs. It makes the case for much more systematic initiatives to tap the ubiquitous intelligence that exists in every society and to increase the chances of social innovations succeeding.

ISBN: 1-905551-01-0 / 978-1-905551-01-9 Authors: Geoff Mulgan with Nick Wilkie, Simon Tucker, Rushanara Ali, Francis Davis and Tom Liptrot Price: £10

what it is, why it matters, how it can be accelerated

The Young Foundation

Silicon Valley and its counterparts have shown what can be achieved when intelligence and investment are devoted to innovation in technology. Over the next few decades we argue that comparable investment and attention need to be directed to innovations that address compelling unmet social needs.

a manifesto for social innovation Social Silicon Valleys a manifesto for social innovation

The world today faces a serious innovation gap. In fields ranging from chronic disease to climate change we badly need more effective models and solutions.

Social Silicon Valleys

The Young Foundation undertakes research to understand social needs and then develops practical initiatives and institutions to address them. Visit youngfoundation.org for further information.

The Young Foundation

Social Silicon Valleys

Social Silicon Valleys

a manifesto for social innovation:

a manifesto for social innovation:

what it is, why it matters and how it can be accelerated

what it is, why it matters and how it can be accelerated

Spring 2006

Spring 2006

Social Silicon Valleys ________________________________________________________________________

Social Silicon Valleys ________________________________________________________________________

Acknowledgements

Acknowledgements

This report has been published with support from the British Council in Beijing. As well as having been prepared to help guide the work and action of the Young Foundation, which was relaunched in 2005, it is also part of the lead up to a major international conference on social innovation to be held in Beijing in late 2006 jointly with the British Council and the China Centre for Comparative Political Economy. (The conference website, which will combine case studies, comments and discussion is www.discoversocialinnovation.org.) We are grateful to the various supporters of the Young Foundation’s practical work in this field, in particular Morgan Stanley and the Baring Foundation who have supported Launchpad, as well as Cisco, the Corporation of London, Philips Design, SAP, BP and Vertex and the Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust. We are grateful for comments from many sources and in particular for helpful steers from Marcial Boo, Eric Rasmussen, Tony Flower, Hilary Cottam, Michael Frye, Charles Handy, Rosabeth Moss Kanter, Gary Hallsworth, Eric Von Hippel, John Kao, Graham Leicester, Robin Murray, Ed Mayo, Martin Sime, Nick Temple, John Thackara and Karl Wilding; and discussions with a range of groups