2014PERU - Unicef

that uses natural resources responsibly and takes care of the environment ... In Peru, we celebrated by recognizing thirteen women and men who have contributed to public policies for .... We supported the Ministry of Education, regional education offices and local education management units in implementing IBE policy ...
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ANNUAL REPORT

2014

PERU

UNICEF works every day so that children in Peru have equal opportunities and develop their full potential. Everything we do is guided by the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the most ratified international human rights treaty in the world. The realization of each of these rights will give rise to a new generation, which we call Generation i: the Generation of Inclusion, the Generation of equal opportunities. Generation i will be a generation of citizens who respect human rights, are tolerant and build peace; a generation that uses natural resources responsibly and takes care of the environment; a generation that respects institutions and norms that strengthen democracy. The generation that will achieve sustainable development in Peru. Generation i is only possible if we guarantee all children their rights.

Foreword 2014 was a special year. We marked the 25th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the most ratified human rights treaty in the world, which guides our work. In Peru, we celebrated by recognizing thirteen women and men who have contributed to public policies for Peruvian children and adolescents. Among the recipients was Javier Pérez de Cuellar, who served as Secretary General of the United Nations when the Convention was adopted in 1989. UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake visited Peru in April. His meetings with President Ollanta Humala and other authorities helped reaffirm UNICEF’s commitment to Peru. This year we reached the midpoint of the current Country Programme 2012-2016. The public policies that have started to take effect at the national and regional level encourage us to keep moving forward. UNICEF continued to work with communities and local and regional authorities in six regions – Amazonas, Apurímac, Ayacucho, Cusco, Loreto and Ucayali – to pilot models for scaling up. Our Child Survival and Development programme continued to help Peru in fighting child mortality, chronic malnutrition and anaemia in young children. The Government of Peru universalized multi-micronutrient supplementation for all children aged six months to three years. In education, Peru’s main challenges include: adapting curricula to the realities of students, strengthening the capacity of teachers, promoting intercultural bilingual education (IBE), expanding access to pre-school in remote areas and investing in infrastructure. In 2014, UNICEF supported Peru’s efforts to overcome these challenges and we continue to do so. Peru has always shown interest in adapting national legislation to align with the Convention. UNICEF has provided technical assistance to the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP) to reform the Code for Children and Adolescents such that it meets international standards and contributes to improving children’s rights. Elections were held across the country to elect municipal, provincial and regional authorities. UNICEF worked with Peru’s elections agency (JNE) to ensure new decision-makers would prioritize children in their government plans. UNICEF also helped develop a new tool to track public spending on children.

Peru’s geography makes it one of the countries most vulnerable to natural disasters. UNICEF continued to work with different levels of government to build a rights-based approach to disaster risk reduction. UNICEF works in Peru to help Peruvians guarantee the rights of children. As international cooperation funding decreases, the cause for children’s rights will depend on national solidarity. This year, along with corporate social responsibility initiatives, UNICEF launched a national monthly donor programme. For the seventh year in a row, the Buena Onda (Good Vibe) social mobilization and fundraising campaign allowed us to share our work with Peruvians. We reached children and youth through the La Onda de mi Cole (My School Vibe) engagement initiative. Around 70,000 students made their voices heard on issues that matter to them: bullying, domestic violence, online safet