3D Printing Technologies & Materials - Sigma-Aldrich

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Volume 11, Number 2

Three-dimensional Science Printing the Future in Multiple Dimensions 3D PRINTING GRAPHENE INK:

CREATING ELECTRONIC AND BIOMEDICAL STRUCTURES AND DEVICES

BIOPRINTING

FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE

3D AND 4D PRINTING TECHNOLOGIES: AN OVERVIEW

3D PRINTABLE CONDUCTIVE NANOCOMPOSITES

OF PLA AND MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES

NANOPARTICLE-BASED ZINC OXIDE ELECTRON TRANSPORT LAYERS

FOR PRINTED ORGANIC PHOTODETECTORS

Introduction Welcome to the second issue of Material Matters™ for 2016, focusing on multi-dimensional printing technologies and printing materials. A number of dramatic technological innovations have added a great deal of character and dimension to the rapidly developing story of threedimensional (3D) printing technologies. Seemingly all at once, new printing technologies have the potential to change everything from daily life to the global economy. Various two-dimensional (2D) printing techniques like inkjet and screen printing are already being used for the fabrication of Jia Choi, Ph.D. flexible electronic devices. 3D printing is rapidly emerging to attract interest Aldrich Materials Science from both the academic community and the business world. Numerous studies have been performed to improve the methods and instrumentation for 3D printing using a wide range of new and existing materials, including plastic, metal, ceramic, wood, nanomaterials (like graphene), and even biomaterials. In this issue of Material Matters, we concentrate on recent advances in multi-dimensional printing technologies, from 2D to 4D, and the promising applications employing these printing techniques in multiple disciplines. In our first article, Prof. Ramille N. Shah et al. (Northwestern University, USA) highlight novel graphene inks for 2D and 3D printing. Developments in 2D and 3D-printable graphene-based materials began with the development of ready-to-use graphene materials for device research and engineering. The authors demonstrate that their 3D graphene ink can be used to print large, robust 3D structures containing 60–70% graphene and exhibit unique mechanical and biological properties. Prof. Peter Yang et al. (Stanford University, USA), in the second article, review the use of bioprinting for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Bioprinting is a new biofabrication technology used to create cellular constructs through the printing of polymer, ceramic, or other scaffolds, or even through the printing of the cells themselves. An increasing demand for new disease models, more predictive toxicity screening methods, and the emerging potential of tissue and organ printing is stimulating the development of bioprinting. The article introduces bioprinting approaches based on materials and discusses the current challenges, potential solutions, and bioprinting trends. In the third article, Dr. Wonjin Jo et al. (Korea Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea) provide a brief overview of multi-dimensional printing technologies. The authors highlight recent advances in printing processes and printing materials development for 3D printing. They also introduce the concept of “4D printing” in which the form or function of a printed structure changes with time in response to stimuli such as temperature, light, or pressure. Prof. Daniel Therriault et al. (École Polytechnique Montréal, Canada) discuss the promises offered by nanomaterial-based nanocomposites in the fourth article. The authors specifically focus on conductive carbon nanotubes and polymer nanocomposites for 3D printing. This research shows the strong potential for 3D printing as a novel method for manufacturing nanocomposites with promising applications such as reinforced structural parts, flexible electronics, electromagnetic shielding grids, and liquid sensors. The final article by Dr. Gerardo Hernandez-Sosa et al. (Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Germany) describes printed organic photodiodes whi