Accountability in education - unesdoc - Unesco

The Education 2030 Incheon Declaration and Framework for Action specifies that the mandate of the Global. Education Monitoring Report is to be “the mechanism for monitoring and reporting on SDG 4 and on education in the other SDGs” with the responsibility to “report on the implementation of national and international ...
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G LO B A L E D U C AT IO N M O N I TO R I N G R E P O R T

Accountability in education: MEETING OUR COMMITMENTS

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

Sustainable Development Goals

2017/8

G LO B A L ED U C AT IO N M O N I TO R I N G R EP O R T

Accountability in education: MEETING OUR COMMITMENTS

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

Sustainable Development Goals

2017/8

The Education 2030 Incheon Declaration and Framework for Action specifies that the mandate of the Global Education Monitoring Report is to be “the mechanism for monitoring and reporting on SDG 4 and on education in the other SDGs” with the responsibility to “report on the implementation of national and international strategies to help hold all relevant partners to account for their commitments as part of the overall SDG follow-up and review”. It is prepared by an independent team hosted by UNESCO. The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of UNESCO concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area, or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. The Global Education Monitoring Report team is responsible for the choice and the presentation of the facts contained in this book and for the opinions expressed therein, which are not necessarily those of UNESCO and do not commit the Organization. Overall responsibility for the views and opinions expressed in the Report is taken by its Director.

© UNESCO, 2017 Second edition Published in 2017 by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization 7, Place de Fontenoy, 75352 Paris 07 SP, France Graphic design by FHI 360 Layout by FHI 360 Cover photo: David Tett Cartoons by Godfrey Mwampembwa (GADO) Illustration 1.1 by Housatonic Design Network Data visualisation by Valerio Pellegrini The cover photo is of a protest at Wendell Primary School in England (United Kingdom). Typeset by UNESCO ISBN: 978-92-3-100239-7

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Foreword There are today 264 million children and youth not going to school – this is a failure that we must tackle together, because education is a shared responsibility and progress can only be sustainable through common efforts. This is essential to meet the ambitions of Sustainable Development Goal on education (SDG 4), part of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Governments, schools and teachers have a frontline role to play here, hand-in-hand with students themselves and parents. Moving forward requires having clear lines of responsibility, knowing when and where those lines are broken and what action is required in response – this is the meaning of accountability, the focus of this Global Education Monitoring (GEM) Report. The conclusion is clear – the lack of accountability risks jeopardizing progress, allowing harmful practices become embedded in education systems. For one, the absence of clearly-designed education plans by Governments can blur roles and mean that promises will remain empty and policies not funded. When public systems do not provide an education of sufficient quality, and for-profit actors fill the gap but operate without regulations, the margin