advice and consent - Harvard Law School

RUTKUS & SOLLENBERGER, supra note 5, at 30. 13. See Helen Dewar, Bush, ... See Senator Orrin Hatch, Press Conference at Room S-207, The United States. Capitol (Apr. 12, 2002) .... 33 Wilson's call for “unity in the executive” would ...
571KB Sizes 11 Downloads 332 Views
 

 

TOWARD THE FRAMERS’ UNDERSTANDING OF   “ADVICE AND CONSENT”:  A HISTORICAL AND TEXTUAL INQUIRY  ADAM J. WHITE* 

I.  

THE FRAMING AND RATIFICATION OF THE   ADVICE AND CONSENT CLAUSE...........................110 A. The Constitutional Convention...................110 1. Appointment of Judges and Other  Officers.....................................................110 2. Matters Related to Senate Advice and  Consent ....................................................121 B. Post‐Convention Debates.............................126 1. The Federalist Papers................................127 2. State Ratification Debates......................129 3. Post‐Ratification Debate ........................131 II. THE MASSACHUSETTS EXPERIENCE .....................131 A. The History of the Council ..........................132 B. The Council in Practice: “Advice” and  “Consent”.......................................................135 C. Summary ........................................................140 III. MADISON’S ALTERNATIVE, AND COMPLETIONS  VERSUS VETOES .....................................................141 A. Madison’s Proposal Versus Gorham’s   Advice and Consent .....................................142 B. A Textual Framework: Completion Versus  Veto .................................................................143 1. Veto or Completion? ..............................144 2. Discretionary Completion or   Mandatory Completion? .......................145 C. Summary ........................................................146

                                                                                                                   * Associate, Baker Botts L.L.P.; J.D., Harvard Law School, 2004; B.B.A., Univer‐ sity  of  Iowa,  2001.  The  author  thanks  David  Barker,  Adam  Budesheim,  Philip  Hamburger,  Douglas  Kmiec,  Andrew  Oldham,  Richard  Parker,  Nels  Peterson,  and Kevin White for helpful comments. This Article represents only the views of  the author. 

 

104 

Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy 

[Vol. 29 

IV. CONCLUSION .........................................................147   INTRODUCTION  During  President  George  W.  Bush’s  first  term,  no  domestic  issue excited the Republican and Democratic bases like judicial  nominations.1 Upon the President’s reelection, attention on the  war  for  the  courts  continued  as  the  President  announced  the  renomination  of  twenty  people  whose  first‐term  nominations  had  not  received  up‐or‐down  votes  in  the  full  U.S.  Senate.2  In  2005, President Bush’s first nomination to the Supreme Court— that of Judge John Roberts to replace the late Chief Justice Wil‐ liam Rehnquist—was confirmed without delay. As of the writ‐ ing  of  this  article,  the  President’s  second  nomination—that  of  Judge Samuel Alito to replace Justice Sandra Day O’Connor — faced scattered threats of opposition‐party delay.3  This  marks  only  the  most  recent  battle  in  the  war  for  the  courts.  Beginning  in  earnest  with  the  nomination  of  then‐ Justice  Abe  Fortas  to  replace  outgoing  Chief  Justice  Earl  War‐ ren, and continuing through the contentious nomination battle  over Judge Robert Bork and the media spectacle of the Clarence  Thomas  hearings,  the  fight  in  the  Senate  to  seat  judges  had  risen to Beltway prominence by the mid‐1990s.4  During  the  Clinton  presidency,  however,  Senate  refusal  to  confirm  nominations  had  assumed  a  markedly  different  form.  No  longer  was  the  Senate  voting  to  reject  nominees,  as  it  had  done  with  the  Bork  nomination  and  many  others  in  the  past;  instead, the Senate was not voting at all.  President  Clinton’s  nominations  to  a  variety  of  seats  on  the  courts of appeals failed to result in appointments as the Repub‐                                                                                                                    1. Se