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CENTRAL POLICY UNIT THE GOVERNMENT OF THE HONG KONG SPECIAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGION

A STUDY ON CIVIC VALUES AND ENGAGEMENT OF ‘POST-90s’ IN HONG KONG

THE CHINESE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG

FEBRUARY 2016

A Study on “Civic Values and Engagement of ‘Post-90s’ in Hong Kong”

《香港「九十後」的公民價值及參與研究》

Final Report

Submitted by Public Policy Research Centre Hong Kong Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Principal Investigator: Stephen WK Chiu)

February 2016

Table of Contents Preface

Page i

Executive Summary

S1-S13

摘要

S14-S23

I. Background of the Study

1

II. Methodology

3

III Sampling and Data Collection

5

IV. Findings from the Survey of Secondary School Students 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Socio-demographic Profile of the Survey Respondents

6 6 6

4.3 Students’ Dispositions and Attitudes towards Civic Engagement 4.3.1 Interest in Political Issues 4.3.2 Self-concept in Politics 4.3.3 Citizenship Self-efficacy 4.3.4 Civic Participation at School 4.3.5 Communication on Political and Social Issues 4.3.6 Civic Participation in the Wider Community 4.3.7 Political Participation in the Past Twelve Months 4.3.8 Expected Future Political Participation 4.3.9 Perceived Effectiveness of Political Activities

10 10 12 13 15 17 20 21 23 26

4.3.10 Level of Civic Knowledge 4.4 Students’ Values and Attitudes 4.4.1 Perceptions of Democracy 4.4.2 Perceptions of Good Citizenship 4.4.3 Trust in Civic Institutions 4.4.4 Perceptions of Country 4.4.5 National and Local Identity 4.4.6 Perceptions of Equal Rights in Society 4.4.7 Materialist and Post-materialist Value Orientations

28 29 29 31 34 35 38 39 42

4.5 Students’ Views towards Selected Social and Political Issues 4.5.1 Satisfaction with Different Aspects of Life

44 44

4.5.2 Self Evaluation of Quality of Life and their Future 4.5.3 Intention to Study or Work in the Mainland 4.5.4 Attitudes to Selected Social Issues 4.5.5 Support for Political Parties 4.5.6 Attitudes towards Liberal Studies 4.6 Multivariate Analysis of Students’ Political Participation 4.6.1 A Model of Influences on Expected and Actual Political Participation 4.6.2. Results of Analysis V. Findings from Focus Group Interviews 5.1 How Does Political Socialization Take Place? 5.1.1 Schooling 5.1.2 Mass Media 5.1.3 Online Media 5.1.4 Peers 5.1.5 Family 5.2 Views towards Political Participation 5.3 Views towards Liberal Studies 5.4 Views towards Social Mobility 5.5 Views towards the Hong Kong SAR Government 5.6 Views towards the mainland China VI. Findings from In-depth Interviews 6.1 How Does Political Socialization Take Place? 6.1.1 Schooling 6.1.2 Mass Media 6.1.3 Online Media 6.1.4 Peers 6.1.5 Family 6.2 Views towards Political Participation 6.3 Views towards Liberal Studies 6.4 Views towards Social Mobility 6.5 Views towards the Hong Kong SAR Government 6.6 Views towards the mainland China VII. Summary and Conclusion 7.1 Objectives of the Study

Page 45 46 47 48 49 52 53 56 62 62 62 64 66 68 69 71 73 76 77 78 81 81 82 83 85 87 87 89 91 93 94 95 97 97

7.2 Research Design 7.3 Summary of Main Findings 7.4 Are post-90s politically active or apathetic? 7.5 Policy Implications 7.5.1 Fostering Active and Participatory Citizenship 7.5.2 Promotion of Participation through Institutional Channels

Page 97 98 101 104 104 106

References

109

Appendix Appendix 1: Questions on Students’ Civic Knowledge Appendix 2: Discussion Guide for Focus Group Interviews Appendix 3: Discussion Guide for In-depth Interviews

1 2-3 4-6

Appendix 4: Profiles of Informants of In-depth Interviews

7

List of Tables Table 4.2

Socio-demographic profi