Births - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Jun 2, 2016 - Brady E. Hamilton, Ph.D., Joyce A. Martin, M.P.H., and Michelle J.K. Osterman, M.H.S., Division of Vital Statistics. Methods—Data are ..... Martin JA, Osterman MJK, Kirmeyer SE, Gregory ECW. Measuring ...... Jacqueline M. Davis; and graphics were produced by Erik Richardson (contractor). Suggested ...
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National Vital Statistics Reports Volume 65, Number 3

June 2, 2016 Selected preterm birth rates for 2014 have been corrected in the text and in Tables 5, 6, and I-2--July 26, 2016

Births: Preliminary Data for 2015

Brady E. Hamilton, Ph.D., Joyce A. Martin, M.P.H., and Michelle J.K. Osterman, M.H.S., Division of Vital Statistics

Abstract

Methods—Data are based on 99.53% of 2015 births. Records for the few states with less than 100% of records received are weighted to independent control counts of all births received in state vital statistics offices in 2015. Comparisons are made with final 2014 data and earlier years.

Objectives—This report presents preliminary 2015 data on U.S. births. Births are shown by age and race and Hispanic origin of mother. Data on marital status, cesarean delivery, preterm births, and low birthweight are also presented.

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10%–19% decline Less than 10% decline No change* Increase

*Change not significant at p = 0.05. SOURCE: NCHS, National Vital Statistics System.

Figure 1. Percent change in low-risk cesarean delivery rates, by state: United States, final 2009 and preliminary 2015

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

National Center for Health Statistics

National Vital Statistics System

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National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 65, No. 3, June 2, 2016

Results—The 2015 preliminary number of U.S. births was 3,977,745, down slightly (less than 1%) from 2014. For the three largest race and Hispanic origin groups in the United States, the number of births decreased for non-Hispanic white women, increased for Hispanic women, and were essentially unchanged for non-Hispanic black women in 2015. The general fertility rate was 62.5 births per 1,000 women aged 15–44, down less than 1% from 2014. The birth rate for teenagers aged 15–19 decreased 8% in 2015 to 22.3 births per 1,000 women, another historic low for the country; rates decreased for both younger and older teenagers to record lows. The birth rate for women in their early 20s declined to 76.9 births per 1,000 women, another record low. The rate for women in their late 20s declined as well, to 104.3 births, also a record low. Birth rates for women in their 30s and early 40s increased in 2015. The nonmarital birth rate declined 1% in 2015, to 43.5 births per 1,000 unmarried women aged 15–44. The cesarean delivery rate declined for the third year in a row to 32.0%, and the low-risk cesarean delivery rate declined again to 25.7% in 2015. The preterm birth rate (based on obstetric estimate of gestation) was up slightly in 2015 to 9.62%, the first increase in this rate since 2007. The low birthweight rate was also up in 2015 to 8.07%. Keywords: birth rates • maternal and infant health • vital statistics

Introduction This report from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) presents preliminary data on births and birth rates and selected maternal and infant health characteristics (including low-risk cesarean delivery [Figure 1]) for the United States in 2015. The findings are based on nearly 100% of registered vital records occurring in calendar year 2015, which were received and processed by NCHS as of February 11, 2016.