Campus Plan Report - Squarespace

can read the whole plan online at campusplan.georgetown.edu. ... term academic master planning process, especially as it relates to our downtown campuses.
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Introduction We are nearing completion on the University’s 2017-2036 Campus Plan. Although the Campus Plan allows for a reasonable measure of flexibility, the current document provides a comprehensive framework for growth, construction, and changes to student space over the next twenty years. Unlike past Campus Plans, this plan was developed as part of a close partnership between administrators, students, and neighbors within the Georgetown Community Partnership (GCP). You can read the whole plan online at campusplan.georgetown.edu. As part of the campus planning process, GUSA also worked behind the scenes to negotiate and sign a related Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the University in May 2016. You can read the whole memorandum online at bit.ly/campusplanMOU. This report is intended to succinctly explain both documents in a way that is relevant to students. It is divided into sections on academics, athletics and recreation, enrollment, housing and renovations, student life, sustainability, and transportation. The end of this report contains an explanation of the next steps in the campus planning process.

Academics The 2017-2036 Campus Plan allows for the renovation or construction of academic space in four different parts of campus: • The Reiss Science Building could either be renovated or completely replaced with a new mixed-use academic building. • A new academic building could be constructed on the empty space between Regents Hall and Harbin Hall. • A new academic building could be constructed on top of a renovated Harbin Patio. • Lauinger Library could either be renovated or expanded to fill the parking lot behind it. Additional information on academic space can be found in sections 3.2.3 and 3.2.4.4 of the Campus Plan at campusplan.georgetown.edu. Moving forward, GUSA will advocate for the inclusion of student voices in the University’s longerterm academic master planning process, especially as it relates to our downtown campuses.

Athletics and Recreation The 2017-2036 Campus Plan allows for the renovation or total replacement of the Yates Field House and Kehoe Field. The new Yates would likely be situated to the north of its existing site, effectively “flipping” the locations of Yates and Shaw Field in order to maximize field space, build a bigger and better facility, and eliminate the existing “canyon” effect on West Road. The Campus Plan also allows for new hotel space as part of a new Yates facility, linking it to the existing hotel and conference center in the Leavey Center.

Additional information on athletic space can be found in section 3.2.3, section 3.2.4.3, and Exhibit P of the Campus Plan at campusplan.georgetown.edu. Moving forward, GUSA will advocate for the right of club sports athletes to use a nearby and highquality off-campus field until Kehoe Field is eventually replaced.

Enrollment The 2017-2036 Campus Plan includes the continuation of the same student enrollment levels established in the last Campus Plan. The traditional undergraduate program cap is 6,675 students. Additional information on enrollment can be found in section 3.1.1 of the Campus Plan at campusplan.georgetown.edu.

Housing and Renovations The 2017-2036 Campus Plan commits the University to house an additional 244 undergraduate students by 2030. In order to meet this requirement, the University can utilize a combination of three options: • By renovating residence halls like Henle, Village A, and Alumni Square (Village B), we can make existing on-campus housing facilities more attractive and persuade more juniors and seniors to choose to live on campus. • If we increase the number of students that study abroad each year, we can open up even more beds for juniors and seniors who want to live on campus. • If necessary, we can construct additional beds in any of the following places: • Henle and Village A could be modestly expanded. • St. Mary’s Hall could be converted into housing. • Part of a redeveloped Reiss Science Building could be converted into housing. •