China and Afghanistan - Amazon AWS

stan's economic reconstruction, especially when it advances Chinese foreign economic interests. China is not as interested in Afghanistan's domestic economic ...
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a report of the csis russia and eurasia program

China and Afghanistan china’s interests, stances, and perspectives

1800 K Street, NW  |  Washington, DC 20006 Tel: (202) 887-0200  |  Fax: (202) 775-3199 E-mail: [email protected]  |  Web: www.csis.org

Author Zhao Huasheng Foreword Andrew C. Kuchins

March 2012 ISBN 978-0-89206-707-7

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CHARTING

our future

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a report of the csis russia and eurasia program

China and Afghanistan china’s interests, stances, and perspectives

Author Zhao Huasheng Foreword Andrew C. Kuchins

March 2012

CHARTING

our future

About CSIS—50th Anniversary Year For 50 years, the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) has developed practical solutions to the world’s greatest challenges. As we celebrate this milestone, CSIS scholars continue to provide strategic insights and bipartisan policy solutions to help decisionmakers chart a course toward a better world. CSIS is a bipartisan, nonprofit organization headquartered in Washington, D.C. The Center’s 220 full-time staff and large network of affiliated scholars conduct research and analysis and develop policy initiatives that look into the future and anticipate change. Since 1962, CSIS has been dedicated to finding ways to sustain American prominence and prosperity as a force for good in the world. After 50 years, CSIS has become one of the world’s preeminent international policy institutions focused on defense and security; regional stability; and transnational challenges ranging from energy and climate to global development and economic integration. Former U.S. senator Sam Nunn has chaired the CSIS Board of Trustees since 1999. John J. Hamre became the Center’s president and chief executive officer in 2000. CSIS was founded by David M. Abshire and Admiral Arleigh Burke. CSIS does not take specific policy positions; accordingly, all views expressed herein should be understood to be solely those of the author(s).

Cover photos: Left—U.S. embassy photo taken on U.S. ambassador Karl W. Eikenberry’s tour of a damaged shopping mall in Kabul, Afghanistan, http://www.flickr.com/photos/kabulpublic diplomacy/4292398455/; top—photo of Chinese flag by Michael Choi, http://www.flickr.com/ photos/m_r3volution/5079391743/; bottom—U.S. Marine Corps photo of Marines searching for hidden munitions in Afghanistan, http://www.flickr.com/photos/marine_corps/5051135220/.

© 2012 by the Center for Strategic and International Studies. All rights reserved. ISBN 978-0-89206-707-7

Center for Strategic and International Studies 1800 K Street, NW, Washington, DC 20006 Tel: (202) 887-0200 Fax: (202) 775-3199 Web: www.csis.org 2

contents Foreword  Andrew C. Kuchins  v China Keeps Low-Key Positions on Afghanistan   1 Security Is the Core Concern of China   3 China Joins in the Postwar Rebuilding of Afghanistan   4 China Refuses Military Involvement and Takes a Cautious Approach to the Taliban    7 China Supports the SCO’s Activities in Afghanistan   9 China Relies on the Success of the “Kabul Process”    14 About the Author   21

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foreword

With the imminent drawdown of U.S. forces in Afghanistan and the shift to full Afghan sovereignty by 2014, it seems axiomatic that U.S. influence and engagement will diminish in Afghanistan and its neighboring region in the years ahead. However, the political, economic, and security challenges of Afghan and regional stabilization will remain enormous long after 2014. How and to what extent other countries may be ready to assume a larger role in promoting Afghan stabilization are increasingly urgent questions for U.S. and international security policymakers. China’s interests in Afghanistan are significant, and in this report Zhao Huasheng of Fudan University carefully lays out in a very nuanced and insightful manner Beijing’s p