Deinstitutionalisation and Community Living ... - University of Kent

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Deinstitutionalisation and Community Living Intellectual disability services in Scandinavia, Britain and the USA

Edited by Jim Mansell University of Kent at Canterbury and Kent Ericsson University of Uppsala

London: Chapman and Hall

Deinstitutionalisation and Community Living Intellectual Disability Services in Scandinavia, Britain and the USA Jim Mansell and Kent Ericsson (Eds) Contents Chapter Author Filename

1

Editors’ Note Foreword Introduction: towards deinstitutionalisation

Closing institutions 2 Closing Laconia 3 Closing institutions in New York State 4 Issues in community services in Britain 5 Deinstitutionalisation in the Norwegian welfare state Models of community services 6 Housing for the person with intellectual handicap 7 Supported living policies and programs in the USA 8 Quality of support for ordinary living Effects of deinstitutionalisation on service users 9 Immediate psychological effects of deinstitutionalisation 10 Results of deinstitutionalisation in Connecticut 11 Impact of deinstitutionalisation on service users in UK 12 The transition to community services in Norway Effects of deinstitutionalisation on families of service users 13 Relatives’ opinion about institutional closure 14 Family attitudes to deinstitutionalisation in Norway 15 From complaining to campaigning 16 Conclusion: integrating diverse experience References Figure Captions List of contributors Index

Mansell and Ericsson Bradley Ericsson and Mansell

Shumway Castellani Mansell Tossebro

Ericsson Allard Felce

Saloviita Conroy Emerson and Hatton Sandvin

Tuvesson and Ericsson Tossebro Brown, Orlowska and Mansell Mansell and Ericsson

Deinstitutionalisation and Community Living Intellectual disability services in Scandinavia, Britain and the USA Contributors Mary Ann Allard PhD Administrator Governor’s Commission on Mental Retardation Saltonstall Building Room 1103A Boston MA 02202 USA Valerie Bradley President Human Services Research Institute 2336 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02140 USA Hilary Brown PhD Senior Lecturer in Learning Disability Tizard Centre Beverley Farm University of Kent at Canterbury Canterbury Kent, CT2 7LZ UK Paul Castellani PhD Director of Program Research New York State Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities 44 Holland Avenue Albany, New York, 12229 USA James Conroy PhD Conroy Output Analysts, Inc 113 Sibley Avenue Ardmore, PA 19003 USA Eric Emerson Deputy Director Hester Adrian Research Centre University of Manchester Manchester M13 9PL UK

Kent Ericsson Research Psychologist Centre for Handicap Research Uppsala University Box 170047 S-750 17 Uppsala Sweden Professor David Felce PhD Director Welsh Centre for Learning Disabilities Meridian Court North Road Cardiff CF4 3BL Wales UK Chris Hatton Research Fellow Hester Adrian Research Centre University of Manchester Manchester M13 9PL UK Professor Jim Mansell Director Tizard Centre Beverley Farm University of Kent at Canterbury Canterbury Kent, CT2 7LZ UK Danuta Orlowska Lecturer in Learning Disability Tizard Centre Beverley Farm University of Kent at Canterbury Canterbury Kent, CT2 7LZ UK Timo Saloviita University of Jyväskylä Department of Special Education PO Box 35 SF-40351 Jyväskylä Finland

Johans Sandvin Nordlandsforskning Mörkved PO Box 6003 N-8016 Bodö Norway Donald Shumway Director New Hampshire Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services State Office Park South 105 Pleasant Street, Concord New Hampshire 03301 USA Barbro Tuvesson Social Worker Ekängsvägen 37 541 41 Skövde Sweden Jan Tøssebro Department of Sociology University of Trondheim N-7055 Dragvoll Norway

Valerie Bradley Vice-Chair and Presiding Officer of the US President's Committee on Mental Retardation

The true consequences of major changes in any sphere of public policy are revealed in a frustratingly slow fashion. Even when dramatic shifts are accompanied by