Emigration to the UK in 2012 - Crosscare Migrant Project

organisations across the UK which had been identified through preliminary online research. The majority of these were Irish support organisations; however ...
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Emigration to the UK in 2012 New Irish emigrants accessing homeless and welfare services

Research Project

August 2012

Introduction Crosscare Migrant Project is an Irish non-government information, advocacy and referral organisation. We are supported by the Emigrant Support Programme of the Department of Foreign Affairs & Trade to provide a service to Irish emigrants, particularly those in vulnerable situations. There has been a significant increase in the emigration of Irish nationals since 2009. The Central Statistics Office has estimated that 18,400 Irish nationals emigrated from Ireland in the twelve months up to April 2009. In the following twelve month period, this figure had increased by more than 50% to 27,700 Irish nationals emigrating. When the most recent figures were released in September 2011, they showed an even more significant increase to 40,200 Irish nationals who left Ireland in the twelve months to April 2011. Of these Irish emigrants, it is estimated that approximately one third have emigrated to the UK. Crosscare previously commissioned a piece of research in 2005 entitled ‘Still Leaving: Recent, vulnerable Irish emigrants to the UK: profile, experiences & pre-departure solutions.’ The brief for that piece of research focused on: ‘compiling quantitative data on the numbers of and characteristics of recent, vulnerable Irish emigrants to the UK; on the provision of qualitative data on contributing factors in decisions to emigrate to the UK; data on experiences of recent, vulnerable emigrants to the UK, including problems encountered when accessing services; and to identify how Emigrant Advice [our project’s previous name] might better identify and access potential vulnerable emigrants prior to leaving Ireland and work more effectively with UK agencies to improve the lot of recent, vulnerable Irish emigrants.’ In this context, we decided it was an opportune time to carry out an updated piece of research on new Irish emigration to the UK. Given our stated aim to prioritise working with people in vulnerable situations, we focused the research particularly on ‘crisis emigration’, looking at Irish emigrants recently arrived in the UK in vulnerable situations such as homelessness, addiction, domestic violence or unemployment. The primary aim of this piece of research was to gather information on the profile of people who have left Ireland and found themselves in vulnerable situations in the UK, and to identify the issues they faced upon arrival in the UK.

Emigration to the UK in 2012 - new Irish emigrants accessing homeless and welfare services Crosscare Migrant Project – August 2012 www.migrantproject.ie

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The information gathered and documented in this research will improve the service Crosscare Migrant Project provides to intending emigrants to the UK by enabling us to provide up to date and relevant practical information to them based on experience and knowledge of the issues and challenges they may face upon arrival in the UK. A secondary purpose of the research was to establish and develop links and contacts with relevant organisations and/or individuals that can be maintained by Crosscare Migrant Project beyond the period of the research in order for us to be linked in and continually aware of the issues and challenges facing newly arrived Irish emigrants in the UK.

Emigration to the UK in 2012 - new Irish emigrants accessing homeless and welfare services Crosscare Migrant Project – August 2012 www.migrantproject.ie

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Methodology The research undertaken for this report was mainly of a qualitative nature. Some quantitative data was obtained from the Central Statistics Office Ireland, the Department of Work and Pensions in the UK, and the CHAIN database of Broadway London, a homeless charity. There is a difficulty in obtaining accurate and up to date statistics as entries and exits to and from Ireland and the UK are not recorded, and the nature of travel between the UK and Ireland is s