Eurostat - European Commission - Europa EU

Mar 5, 2015 - market. The tables in this News Release only show a small part of the large amount of gender based data available at Eurostat. A dedicated section as well as some infographics on the topic ... and Austria have all a female employment rate above 70% and a share of part-time employment among females.
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41/2015 - 5 March 2015

8 March 2015: International Women’s Day

Women earned on average 16% less than men in 2013 in the EU 2 out of 3 managers are men, 2 out of 3 clerical workers are women 1

In 2013, the gender pay gap stood at 16.4% in the European Union (EU), ranging from less than 5% in Slovenia to more than 20% in Estonia, Austria, the Czech Republic and Germany. The gender pay gap represents the difference between average gross hourly earnings of male paid employees and of female paid employees as a percentage of average gross hourly earnings of male paid employees. 2

Differences between females and males in the labour market do not only concern wage discrepancies but also 3 and along with it, the type of occupations held. Though representing 46% of employed persons, women were under-represented amongst managers, with only a third being female in 2013 in the EU. On the contrary, women were over-represented among clerical support workers as well as among service and sales workers, accounting for around two-thirds of employed persons in these occupations. The gap between men and women in the labour market was also significant as regards the type of employment held. In 2013, 1 employed woman out of 3 (31.8%) worked part-time, compared with fewer than 1 man out of 10 (8.1%). 4

On the occasion of International Women’s Day on 8 March 2015, Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union, publishes a selection of data on men and women with regard to their situation on the labour market. The tables in this News Release only show a small part of the large amount of gender based data available at Eurostat. A dedicated section as well as some infographics on the topic of gender equality is available on the 5 Eurostat website .

Lowest gender pay gap in Slovenia, largest in Estonia In 2013 in the EU Member States, the gender pay gap was less than 10% in Slovenia (3.2%), Malta (5.1%), Poland (6.4%), Italy (7.3%), Croatia (7.4%), Luxembourg (8.6%), Romania (9.1%) and Belgium (9.8%). At the opposite end of the scale, the gender pay gap was over 20% in Estonia (29.9%), Austria (23.0%), the Czech Republic (22.1%) and Germany (21.6%). Compared with 2008, the gender pay gap has dropped in 2013 in a majority of EU Member States. The most noticeable decreases between 2008 and 2013 were recorded in Lithuania (from 21.6% in 2008 to 13.3% in 2013, or -8.3 percentage points), Poland (-5.0 pp), the Czech Republic and Malta (both -4.1 pp) and Cyprus (-3.7 pp). In contrast, the gender pay gap has risen between 2008 and 2013 in nine Member States, with the most significant increases being observed in Portugal (from 9.2% in 2008 to 13.0% in 2013, or + 3.8 percentage points), Spain (+3.2 pp), Latvia (+2.6 pp), Italy (+2.4 pp) and Estonia (+2.3 pp). At EU level, the gender pay gap has decreased slightly, from 17.3% in 2008 to 16.4% in 2013.

Gender pay gap1 in the EU Member States (in %) Total 2008

Evolution 2013/2008 (in percentage points)

2013

EU*

17.3

Belgium

10.2

9.8

-0.4 pp

Bulgaria

12.3

13.5

+1.2 pp

Czech Republic

26.2

22.1

-4.1 pp

Denmark

17.1

16.4

-0.7 pp

Germany

22.8

21.6

-1.2 pp

Estonia

27.6

29.9

+2.3 pp

Ireland**

12.6

14.4

+1.8 pp

Greece**

15.0

:

:

Spain

16.1

19.3

+3.2 pp

France

16.9

15.2

-1.7 pp

Croatia

:

7.4

: +2.4 pp

Italy

16.4

-0.9 pp

4.9

7.3

Cyprus