Fantasy Sports League Online Advertising ... - WhatRunsWhere

... in part, and in any form or by any means is not permitted without the written express consent ... Advertisers prefer the use of ad networks, in particular the Google Display ..... DFP Mobile, 10% AdMob, 5% Quigo Adsonar, 3% Adwords and 2% ...
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WhatRunsWhere Insights & Analysis:

Fantasy Sports League Online Advertising Landscape

WhatRunsWhere Insights & Analysis: Fantasy Sports League Online Advertising Landscape Executive Summary

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Introduction

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Desktop

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Share of Voice Publishers & Categories Channel Mix Top Performing Ads

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Mobile Share of Voice Publishers & Categories Channel Mix Top Performing Ads Devices Breakdown

08 - 13

Conclusion

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08 08 - 09 09 - 10 11 - 12 12 - 13 13

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Executive Summary This report intends to explore the online advertising landscape of the Fantasy Sports League niche, particularly fantasy football. It will review and compare the advertising campaigns of four key advertisers in the industry and present a comprehensive report regarding their display media buying strategies on desktop and mobile-web.

The research draws attention to the following: Advertisers in this market often utilise publishers that can be classified as ‘Sports’ or ‘News to drive potential users who are already interested in sports to their landing pages and websites Advertisers prefer the use of ad networks, in particular the Google Display Network (GDN) on desktop; however, on mobile direct media buys comprise 50% of all placement methodologies Diverse creatives placed in high volume on relevant publishers and through ad networks on desktop while through direct buys on mobile will likely lead to larger Share of Voice

Recommendation: The key components of a media buying strategy in the Fantasy Sports League market include: 1) employing a diverse array of creatives in high volume 2) through ad networks, especially GDN (on desktop) and 3) on publishers that can be classified as ‘Sports’.

Introduction When fall comes around, it signifies the return of many wonderful things including more pumpkin spice lattes, trips to the apple orchard and crackling warm fires. But most of all, it marks the beginning of a brand new football season. For Fantasy Football fans this means getting your game face on fast, finding the right league to join and, of course, getting first pick to draft the ultimate team. As the excitement unfolds, domains that host fantasy leagues are also launching their online media buying campaigns. But with so many domains placing ads, how can competitors in the fantasy sports niche complete? In an effort to better understand how these sites are marketing themselves online, WhatRunsWhere has investigated the advertising performances of four major websites: fanduel.com (Fan Duel), cbssports.com (CBS – discussed only on desktop), games.espn.go.com (ESPN), draftkings.com (Draft Kings), and football.fantasysports.yahoo.com (Yahoo – discussed only on mobile).

WhatRunsWhere Insights & Analysis: Fantasy Sports League Online Advertising Landscape

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Desktop Having collected data spanning 180 days of activity up until September 22nd, 2014 in the United States, we have successfully tracked 400 unique ads on over 4,900 publishers across desktop, mobile and in-app platforms (Figure 4). Overall advertisers employed more banner ads (322) than text ads (78), a difference of 77.6% indicating image based ad