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FOREFRONT School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering

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UNDERSTANDING THE PHYSICS OF EMBERS

A NEW MILESTONE FOR OREGON STATE ROCKETRY

Fall 2017

Contents PAGE 2

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THE PHYSICS OF EMBERS

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT: JILL LEWIS

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NSF GRANT BOLSTERS EFFORTS IN ROBOTICS, ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, MARINE STUDIES

NEW FACULTY

By Nick Houtman and Owen Perry

By Steve Lundeberg

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PAGE 10 AWARDS AND HONORS

PARTNERING FOR BETTER TRANSIT PLANNING

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SKY’S THE LIMIT

DONOR HONOR ROLL

By Steve Lundeberg

By Nancy Squires

TEAM COMPETITION RESULTS

EDITOR Owen Perry CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Nick Houtman, Steve Lundeberg, Nancy Squires

facebook.com/OregonStateMIME

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Jack Forkey, Owen Perry

@OregonStateMIME

COPY EDITOR Keith Hautala

School of MIME

PHOTOGRAPHERS Tyler Hudson, Owen Perry, George Le, Seth McCammon, Dorthe Wildenschild FOREFRONT is published by the College of Engineering’s Marketing and Communications group. Comments and questions about this publication can be sent to the editor at [email protected]

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School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering Oregon State University 204 Rogers Hall Corvallis, OR 97331 541-737-3101 mime.oregonstate.edu

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Message from the School Head In recent years, the School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering has experienced considerable growth and now includes more than 2,000 students and 55 tenured/tenure-track faculty. As our school has grown, so too has our reputation, both for our cutting-edge research as well as our high-quality graduates. I continue to be inspired by our talented faculty and students. But our work is far from done. We’re developing a framework I named BELONG: Bridging Engineering and Learning on New Ground. At its core, BELONG couples two pillars of the College of Engineering’s strategic plan— becoming a model as an inclusive and collaborative community and providing a transformative educational experience that produces graduates who drive change throughout their lives. As we progress through the academic year, we will implement elements of this framework in support of engineering societies and organizations, undergraduate research experiences, online learning, and pathways for transfer students. My key motivating question is: how do we increase a sense of belonging as we advance engineering excellence and student success? Part of the answer starts with you and our strong alumni network. With support from alumni and industry donors, 110 students are receiving MIME Scholarship Awards for 2017-18. We have also provided funding to 17 student organizations and societies— from Global Formal Racing and AIAA to Engineers Without Borders and Alpha Pi Mu. Programs and clubs such as these help prepare profession-ready graduates by providing experiential education and leadership opportunities. One maxim I particularly agree with is that leaders help create more leaders. I am confident that we will continue to build an even stronger and more successful School of MIME and nurture those leaders. With regards,

Harriet B. Nembhard, Ph.D. School Head of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering Eric R. Smith Professor of Engineering

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On Sept. 2, 2017, a fire, reportedly caused by teenagers throwing fireworks, ignited in the Eagle Creek Canyon near the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon. Three days later, the fire leapt the Columbia River into Washington State—a distance of about 2 miles.

Unfortunately, instances of fires crossing miles in distance is not unprecedented. David Blunck, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Oregon State, is trying to better understand how wildfires spread and to help build a predictive model to assist those fighting to put them out. In a wind tunnel on the Oregon State campus, Blunck and his students set sticks on fire and measure the size and time to formation of the embers that fly off the burning wood. They fasten dowels of known species — white oak, Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, white fir — into a fireproof container, apply a propane flame and turn on a fan. The air stream carries the glowing embers into a metal pan at the end of the tunnel. Blunck is investigating one of the processes that spread the Eagle Creek fire and others like it: ember generation. It’s a phenomenon familiar to anyone who has sat around a campfire and watched sparks fly into the night. However, the violent winds generated by a wildfire have been known to loft firebrands for miles, setting new spot fires and threatening homes and other structures. “We know most embers come from crown fires. People have primarily focused on studying ember transport and ignition, but we’re looking at what controls the formation of them,” says Blunck, the Welty Faculty Fellow who previously studied combustion in gas turbine engines for the U.S. Air Force. FALL 2017

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The physics of embers

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BY NICK HOUTMAN AND OWEN PERRY

“Knowledge regarding the physical process that controls ember formation is lacking.” Blunck knows that the highly controlled environment in the laboratory hardly compares to the blustery maelstrom of a burning forest. But he notes that understanding the controlling factors — wood size, species, moisture, temperature, wind speed — can ultimately be used to help fire managers anticipate one of the most unpredictable and difficult to contain features of spreading wildfire. In addition to wind tunnel studies, Blunck and his team are participating in controlled burns in open air. Comparing the results from such experiments allows the researchers to understand how embers are generated at different scales. They determine the ember generation rate by using infrared imaging and by tracking the number of particles that pass a specified distance from the flame, using image-tracking software. FOREFRONT

A major goal of the work is that correlations and data determined in this study will be integrated with an ember transport model being developed with collaborators in the USDA Forest Service and shared with the fire suppression community. The model will simulate ember transport as a function of wind speed, direction and ember size, and shape.

Left: Graduate student Dan Cowan collects data from a controlled burn conducted by the Nature Conservancy. Opposite: The Eagle Creek wildfire burns near the Columbia River Gorge.

The coupled experimental and computational approach could prove to be a valuable tool to support management decisions. “If I am a fire manager, I need to make decisions about what type of resources to allocate or how best to protect an area,” Blunck explains. Ultimately, he hopes his research will allow those fire managers to better predict where embers will be transported and, therefore, where they should marshal their resources to limit the fire’s spread.

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NSF grant bolsters efforts in robotics, artificial intelligence, marine studies BY STEVE LUNDEBERG

The National Science Foundation has awarded $1 million to five Oregon State University researchers to study the operation of autonomous marine vehicles. The grant further enlarges the university’s robotics footprint three months after the College of Engineering established CoRIS—the Collaborative Robotics and Intelligent Systems Institute — to advance the theory, design, development, and deployment of robots and intelligent systems able to collaborate seamlessly with people. It also broadens the reach of the Oregon State’s Marine Studies Initiative, a university-wide effort to increase understanding of coastal and ocean systems and promote sustainability on key issues including climate change, food security and safety, natural hazards, renewable energy production, and natural resources management. Geoff Hollinger, assistant professor of robotics, and Julie A. Adams, professor of computer science, along with Jack Barth, Jonathan Nash and Kipp Shearman of the College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences are the principal investigators on the $1 million grant. Hollinger, the lead PI, researches autonomous robotic systems, and Adams, an associate director of the CoRIS Institute, is a computer scientist. Barth, the executive director of the Marine Studies Initiative, Nash, and Shearman are physical oceanographers who specialize in making observations at sea using autonomous vehicles. The project builds on cross-campus collaborations that bring engineers and ocean scientists together to produce innovations in OSU-developed ocean-sensing technologies such as ROSS – the robotic oceanographer surface sampler – and advanced underwater glider operations. The project seeks to increase FALL 2017

OSU’s Slocum Gliders provide long-term monitoring using lowpower buoyancy controlled movements that allow them to glide through the ocean. (Photo: Seth McCammon)

vehicles’ “neglect tolerance” – the ability to withstand long periods with little to no communication from a human technician – by improving their autonomy capabilities. “Underwater exploration using unmanned robotic vehicles has opened up vast new ways of understanding the world’s oceans,” Hollinger said. “However, in the current state of practice, human operators must provide specific way points for the vehicles to follow, which is both time consuming and inflexible. The research in this project will develop autonomy capabilities that facilitate onvehicle intelligence, leading to longer duration deployments of unmanned underwater and surface vehicles as well as improving the oceanographic data collected and reducing the cost of these deployments.” The $1 million NSF grant comes on the heels of the $3.6 million the College of Engineering received in robotics-related funding in fiscal year 2017, the nearly $2 million it received the previous year and a recent $6.5 million grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to make artificial-intelligence-based systems like autonomous vehicles and robots more trustworthy. FOREFRONT

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BY STEVE LUNDEBERG

Public transit planners throughout the nation should soon be rolling toward more informed decision making and better service thanks to a partnership between Oregon State University’s College of Engineering and the Oregon Department of Transportation. The university and state transportation officials have teamed up on an extension to the General Transit Feed Specification, commonly known as the GTFS. The extension is called GTFS-ride. Oregon State will release open-source tools for GTFS-ride data storage and analysis sometime this fall, said J. David Porter, professor of industrial engineering at Oregon State. With those tools, planners can see in general how well transit networks are functioning and also easily access specific information about where riders tend to get on and off. In existence for just over a decade, the GTFS defines a common data format for public transportation schedules and related geographic information. Mobile developers use the publicly available data to create applications that riders can use to learn, for example, when the next bus is arriving. The 12-month OSU-ODOT partnership resulted in the GTFS-ride extension, which defines a common format for fixed-route transit ridership. The extension will support the creation of common tools for enhancing transit planners’ ability to analyze and share ridership data. “The main motivation for the project was ODOT and in particular their Rail and FOREFRONT

Public Transit Division didn’t feel they had enough access to ridership data to be able to make informed decisions about funding and improvement projects,” said Porter, who teamed with Oregon State graduate students Ben Fields, Sylvan Hoover and Phillip Carleton on the project. “GTFS-ride extends GTFS and incorporates additional files and fields for transit agencies to reflect their ridership information. It will enable agencies at many different levels of maturity and technological capability to represent ridership in a standardized way that will facilitate information sharing and the use of common software tools. Planners will be able to better understand what a change to a single network does to the entire state network.” At present, each transit agency in Oregon uses a mix of proprietary tools and locally developed solutions to analyze and report transit ridership data; there has been no standardized format for representing ridership. “The old way of doing things made taking advantage of and sharing transit ridership data difficult,” said Hal Gard, administrator of ODOT’s Rail and Public Transit Division. “The GTFS-ride data standard will make it possible for organizations at all levels to get easy access to detailed ridership data.” A description of the GTFS-ride standard is available at https://github.com/ODOT-PTS/ GTFS-ride/blob/master/spec/en/reference. md, and a companion open source GTFS-ride validation tool is available at https://github. com/ODOT-PTS/transitfeed-ride. FALL 2017

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A NEW MILESTONE FOR OREGON STATE ROCKETRY

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In just a few short years, Oregon State University’s branch of AIAA (American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics) has gone from novices to top-tier contenders in collegiate rocketry competitions. This September, they reached a new milestone high above the Black Rock Desert of Western Nevada. The Oregon State AIAA’s HART (High Altitude Rocket Launch Team) successfully launched a two-stage rocket to an altitude of 80,000 feet, a record for Oregon State and one of the highest launches ever for a university team. “This is a truly amazing feat for a team of engineering undergraduates,” said Nancy Squires, a senior instructor in the School of MIME and the team’s advisor. The project began with a discussion in Green River, Utah, at the Experimental Sounding Rocket Association (ESRA) rocket engineering competition with SpaceX recruiters, who wondered what university engineering students could do with a “sky’s the limit” rocket. So began a senior capstone design project at Oregon State with the goal of building a rocket to reach as high an altitude as possible within a Class 2 FAA waiver, which limits the amount and energy of propellant the rocket motor can contain. A team of students (12 mechanical engineering, three electrical engineering, and three computer science) started the design of a two-stage rocket in September 2016. The team added another six mechanical engineering students to design and build a tower that would be required to launch a highaltitude rocket. The team faced several technical challenges in the design stage—a propulsion system that required a very specific burn rate at liftoff in the booster stage and a faster burning motor for the upper stage; electronics that would fire black powder charges to separate the rocket stages and deploy two parachutes; extensive testing to characterize the properties of black powder at very high altitudes; an innovative front-end ignition system integrated into the rocket airframe; a system to track and recover both stages of the rocket at all phases of FOREFRONT

the trajectories; a carbon-fiber and fiberglass airframe; and a new composite fin that could withstand the Mach 2.2 speed and 18-g forces. The day after graduation, the team embarked on the two-day drive to Spaceport America in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Unfortunately, in the first full-range flight, their rocket, named Probatum, encountered a devastating upperstage motor failure. In spite of a very disappointing outcome at Spaceport, the team was determined to launch the rocket again. The flight did confirm that the designs of the more challenging components of the rocket and recovery were successful. So when the team had the opportunity to participate in the Balls of Fire launch in Black Rock later in the summer, they jumped back in. The team arrived at Black Rock with a redesigned upper-stage nozzle and new booster and upper-stage motors. The day started early with rocket assembly and preparation, ideal weather conditions, and the push of a button. The day ended with a lot of cheering after a great success, with perfect motor staging and airframe performance. Both GPS data and onboard altimeters measured an altitude of 80,000 feet. The benefits of this program to students are easy to quantify: Most of the students on the team who graduated are now employed in the aerospace industry or enrolled in graduate programs. Team members are working professionally at companies, including SpaceX, Blue Origin, Orbital ATK, United Launch Alliance, Aerojet-Rocketdyne, Raytheon, and the Naval Weapons Facility China Lake. They have demonstrated the skills required to solve challenging technical problems, and they have shown exceptional dedication, leadership as a team, and passion for aerospace. Up next for Oregon State: A new team of mechanical and electrical engineering and computer science senior capstone students is already underway for the design and manufacturing of a new two-stage rocket. Their ultimate goal is to exceed the current university record of 144,000 feet at Spaceport America in June 2018. FALL 2017

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Alumni spotlight:

Jill Lewis ’11 Structures Certification Engineer, SpaceX What is your role at SpaceX? I’ve been at SpaceX about five years, currently in the role of Structures Certification Engineer. In this position I’m the technical interface for all things ‘structures’ between the SpaceX designers/analysts and our biggest customers: NASA Manned Spaceflight, NASA Cargo missions, and the U.S. Air Force. My team is responsible for internally verifying that we are designing, testing, and analyzing all Falcon (launch vehicle) and Dragon (spacecraft) hardware to meet requirements, while externally performing technical presentations to transfer in-depth structural knowledge to the customers. We are also responsible for addressing all customer questions about Falcon and Dragon. Where did your interest in this field come from? My first two and a half years at SpaceX, I was the Production Engineer (PE) for the Interstage structure, spanning from lamination through structural assembly. I developed a love of composites and production at Oregon State University during my time working on chassis manufacturing for the school’s Formula SAE team, Global Formula Racing (GFR), and was absolutely thrilled to continue my composites manufacturing work into my career. While the PE role was amazing, moving into Certification Engineering has allowed me to combine my bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering with my psychology minor (which has come in handy while working with customers!). I have had the opportunity to be involved with the whole vehicle and expand my technical knowledge to match. As the Structures Certification Engineer for the Falcon Interstage, Second Stage, and Stage Separation system, as well as Dragon 2 (the vehicle that will soon carry NASA Crew), I’ve had incredible opportunities to be intimately involved in cutting-edge aerospace, from design through launch…and landing! FALL 2017

How did the School of MIME prepare you? Oregon State University and the School of MIME do an incredible job of combining both classroom-based learning and hands-on experience. Student clubs supported by the university—including Formula, Baja, Design/ Build/Fly, etc.—also play an enormous role in student readiness. SpaceX is known for its focus on personal responsibility and out of the box thinking. Coming out of the School of MIME and into such a fast-paced industry, I felt wellprepared and up for the challenge, knowing OSU had provided both the fundamentals and industry-level teaching. What is your best memory from your time at OSU? During my senior year (2011) our Formula SAE team’s car took first place at Formula SAE Michigan, Formula Student Germany and Formula Student Austria. Seeing the countless hours in the shop over the course of the year culminate in such a winning season was an incredible feeling. Getting to share that experience with all my teammates made it all the better. Now, six years on, I get to continue to share my successes with much of that original team – at last count there are ten of us from Formula SAE still working together at SpaceX! FOREFRONT

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New faculty Bahman Abbasi, Ph.D. joins Oregon State University as an assistant professor of mechanical engineering. Before joining Oregon State he worked as a lead technologist at Booz Allen Hamilton and a technical advisor to U.S. Department of Energy with wide-ranging experience in power generation systems, solar-thermal energy, high-temperature materials, light metals production and recycling, and water-energy nexus, among other energy technologies. Prior to that he worked in various industries; including, natural gas pipes manufacturing, automotive, as well as a lead engineer at General Electric. He received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Maryland in 2010 with focus on phase-change phenomena and heat transfer, and has authored 20 technical publications including five issued patents. He is excited about mountaineering opportunities in the Cascades, and hopes for a strong basketball season. Megumi Kawasaki, Ph.D. joins Oregon State as an associate professor of materials science. Previously, she was an associate professor at Hanyang University, Seoul, South Korea, where she joined the faculty as an assistant professor in 2012. She also held an adjunct research associate professor in Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering at USC (2012-2017) and a visiting researcher position in materials science at the Osaka Prefecture University (2013-present). Kawasaki’s research interests lie in the area of synthesis and characterizing unique properties of hybrid ultrafine-grained metals and nanocomposites processed by severe plastic deformation (SPD). Her work includes processing of metals and alloys through the application of SPD techniques and characterizing the (bulk and micro) mechanical properties at both ambient and high temperature ranges. She has received an Early Career Award from the Korean Institute of Metals and Materials in April 2016, and received a NanoSPD Young Researcher Award at the 7th International Conference on Nanomaterials by Severe Plastic Deformation (NanoSPD7) in July 2017. She looks forward to living in an area with lots of trees and beautiful natural landscapes.

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Awards and Honors (2016-2017) PROMOTION AND TENURE

Chris Hagen, tenured and promoted to associate professor

Roberto Albertani, tenured at the rank of associate professor

Chris Hoyle, tenured and promoted to associate professor

David Porter, promoted to professor Bill Smart, promoted to professor

FACULTY AND STAFF AWARDS Ravi Balasubramanian OSU Impact Award for Outstanding Scholarship (Oregon State University)

Geoffrey Hollinger Young Investigator Award (Office of Naval Research, Science and Technology)

MIME Excellence Initiative Award (Oregon State University)

Engelbrecht Young Faculty Award (Oregon State University)

Matt Campbell Industry Partnering Award (Oregon State University)

Megumi Kawasaki NanoSPD Young Researcher Award (International NanoSPD Steering Committee)

Toni Doolen Fellow Award (American Society for Engineering Management)

Logen Logendran Award for Technical Innovation in Industrial Engineering (Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers)

Chinweike Eseonu Vice Provost Award of Excellence (Oregon State University)

Cowboy Academy of Industrial Engineering and Management (Oklahoma State University)

Brian Fronk ASHRAE New Investigator Award (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and AirConditioning Engineers) OSU International Service Award (Faculty Senate, Oregon State University) Cindy Grimm Dar Reese Excellence in Advising Award (Oregon State University) Karl Haapala OSU Industry Partnering Award (Oregon State University) Faculty of the Game Award (OnPoint Community Credit Union) Anatol Rapoport Memorial Award (International Society for the Systems Sciences) Chris Hagen SAE Ralph R. Teetor Award (Society of Automotive Engineers) OSU Postdoctoral Mentoring Award (Oregon State University) OSU Faculty Innovator Award (Oregon State University)

Somayeh Pasebani MIME Excellence Award for Instructional and Research Equipment Grants (Oregon State University) Robert Paasch Alumni Professor Award (Oregon State University) Lynn Paul Professional Faculty Award for Organizational Advancement (Oregon State University) Brian Paul Manufacturing Engineering Division Service Award (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Modular Manufacturing Technology Focus Area Lead (RAPID Manufacturing Institute) Kendra Sharp International Service Award (Oregon State University) Erskine Fellowship (University of Canterbury, New Zealand) Julie Tucker CAREER Award (National Science Foundation) Kagan Tumer Excellence in Postdoctoral Mentoring Award (Oregon State University)

Ross Hatton CAREER Award (National Science Foundation) FALL 2017

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STUDENT AWARDS

Hannah Coe was awarded of the MIME Outstanding Graduate Teaching Assistant of the Year Award and consequently was nominated for the College of Engineering Outstanding GTA of the Year Award and won that as well. Hannah was originally nominated by Somayeh Pasebani for her help in preparing lectures and the theoretical development of new courses in additive manufacturing and physical metallurgy. Dr. Pasebani noted that Hannah’s intellect, creativity, and curiosity helped her to ask herself the right questions while preparing lectures, homework and exams and that Hannah’s skills and dedication in grading homework, assessing students’ performance and providing feedback are outstanding. Tyler Hudson was awarded the MIME First Year Graduate Research Assistant Award. David Blunck nominated Tyler saying that he is one of the most productive students at scholarly activities he has ever worked with at OSU. In just three terms, Tyler wrote and presented a conference paper, established the framework for two peer-reviewed publications, developed a hypothesis that could substantially influence the fire community if proven valid, and mentored two undergraduate students, all while also working as a GTA. Firas Siala is the winner of the MIME Outstanding Graduate Research Assistant of the Year Award. Firas was nominated by Dr. Jim Liburdy for his strong and tireless work, his passionate drive to excel and his underlying drive to make a significant impact in the field of alternative energy production, based on a deep rooted understanding of fluid mechanics. Firas was awarded the prestigious Link Foundation Energy Fellowship for 2016-2018. The Link Foundation competition is intense, and past winners have without exception been from top-ranked engineering schools, namely Cal Tech, Berkeley, Stanford, MIT and Harvard. Firas has published in the most prestigious journals in his field and has presented his work at key conferences (these include ASME Fluids Conferences, ASME Power and Energy, AIAA and APS Fluids Division). Jeremy Melamed won the 2017 Burgess/Tektronix Award, which recognizes an outstanding senior in the College of Engineering, as judged by a variety of activities beyond just academic performance, including industrial experience through co-op assignments or internships; project involvement; leadership activities in student, community, and professional organizations; and contribution to the electronics industry.

Anh Tong received the Anatol Rapoport Memorial Award in recognition of the best student paper presented at the annual ISSS Conference in a quantitative, engineering, hard science, natural science, technological, or logico-empirical systems framework. The award seeks to recognize promising work in the systems sciences in this spirit of inquiry.

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Team Competition Results In April, the OSU AIAA Design Build Fly (DBF) team competed in the annual AIAA DBF competition in Tucson, AZ. Up against 95 schools, including MIT, Stanford, and Cornell, Oregon State finished in fifth place, their best showing in six years of competition. The OSU team’s sleek flying wing, constructed in carbon fiber and Kevlar composite materials, and weighing in at just under 1.3 pounds, was capable of carrying a three hockey puck payload. OSU continues to be the highest-placing university without an aerospace major, and once again, the team has proven that Oregon State engineering students are truly soaring to great heights and success. At the inaugural Spaceport America Cup in June, the OSU AIAA ESRA rocketry team placed third in the 30,000 foot, solid motor category. They also received the Team Sportsmanship Award. (Read more about the team on page 6.)

The Oregon State team, Form Forge, won second place at NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge, Beam Member competition. The team was working to find ways to 3-D print habitation structures using recyclables and simulated Martian soil, a technology goal that could support deep space exploration and advance construction capabilities on Earth. (Left: one of the beams the team 3-D printed from sand and plastic.)

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The OSU chapter of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers took second place at the 2017 Shell Eco Marathon Americas out of 27 teams in their vehicle class. They also won an off-track award for best prototype vehicle design.

Global Formula Racing’s combustion engine car was quick and competitive once again, resulting in a second place finish at Formula SAE Michigan. The team was off to a similarly promising start heading into their European tour until unfortunate disqualifications at Formula Student cometitions in Austria and Germany led to 14th and 28th place finishes respectively. The team’s electic car had a quality season, with a second place finish at Formula SAE Italy and eighth place at Formula Student Spain.

In June, the Oregon State Baja team continued their tradition of strong showings, finishing second at Baja SAE Illinois. Earlier in the year, at the Baja SAE California event, a mechanical failure required them to repair the car’s transmission mid-race. The team overcame the challenge and still managed to finish eighth out of 85 teams.

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Donor Honor Roll* Thank you for your generous contributions to the School of MIME $100,000+ ASHRAE BLOUNT INTERNATIONAL, INC. BOEING COMPANY ETI KROM, INC. IRIDIUM LAND COMPANY LLC MEDTRONIC, INC. CHERYL D. RIGGS XAARJET LIMITED

$50,000 - $99,999 INTEL CORPORATION PCC STRUCTURALS, INC.

$25,000 - $49,999 AVANGRID FOUNDATION BROTHER INDUSTRIES LTD. HP, INC. MARY J. & CHARLES GODDARD PAMELA K. & LONNY R. KELLEY ’61 LINK FOUNDATION ROBIN TAN SHARON HASTINGS WELTY ’75 & JAMES R. WELTY ’54

$10,000 - $24,999 ALLEGHENY TECHNOLOGIES, INC. CHEVRON ENERGY TECHNOLOGY COMPANY COLUMBIA HELICOPTERS, INC. DEWSNUP, KING & OLSEN P.C. MONSTER TOOL COMPANY JENNYLEE SANDBERG NESBITT ’59 & GREGORY NESBITT ’58 LOIS J. & JAMES C. RAWERS ’72 JOETTA MILLER & JACKSON WONG ’58

$1,000 - $9,999 A-DEC, INC. AIRSTREAM ADVENTURES NORTHWEST ATI WAH CHANG KEN AUSTIN ’53 JULIE C. & JOHN BARNESON III ’74 BELINDA A. BATTEN & ROBERT K. PAASCH DANIEL BIAGI BLUE ORIGIN LLC NANCY FAIRCHILD & GREG BOREHAM BOB CANTRELL COMPUTER AIDS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING VIVIAN D. & DAVID M. CROW ’61 ELAINE GETHING DAVIS ’49 LINDA S. & J. CRAIG DUTTON ’75 ROBERT ECHENRODE ESCO FOUNDATION GEM EQUIPMENT OF OREGON INCORPORATED WILLIAM B. GREENWOOD ’49 GAIL H. & RALPH W. HENDRICKSON ’61 KERRY ANN FUJIOKA HILL ’00 & ANDREW W. HILL ’00 HYSTER-YALE MATERIALS HANDLING, INC. SANDRA K. & THOMAS C. MADSEN ’69 MARVELL SEMICONDUCTOR, INC. MAZAK FOUNDATION GLORIA B. WYFFELS ’75 & PAUL MCKENNEY ’81 MENTOR GRAPHICS CORPORATION LINDA L. & JOHN T. MYERS ’70 NATIONAL COLLEGIATE INVENTORS & INNOVATORS ALLIANCE HARRIET B. & DAVID NEMBHARD O’BRIEN DENTAL LAB, INC. ROGER D. OLLEMAN OREGON FREEZE DRY, INC. AMY L. & DENNIS K. OSTERLUND ’79 JOANNE TORREY PARKIN ’64 & NEILL R. PARKIN ’63 SHAHINA & ALIRAZA PIYARALI ’84 PRECISION CASTPARTS CORPORATION KATHLEEN F. & GORDON M. REISTAD JONATHAN R. RITTER ’07 DALE A. RODABAUGH ’80 CAROL A. & LEWIS E. SEAGRAVES ’61 THERMO FISHER SCIENTIFIC TONBO IMAGING INCORPORATED ESTHER S. ’76 & TIMOTHY W. TONG ’76 ROGER A. TURNER ’64 WALLACE ENTERPRISES, LLC MARGARET WALLACE JEAN ROSS WATSON ’71 & LARRY N. WATSON ’72 WEYERHAEUSER COMPANY JAY N. WILT ’75 VICKY WARD WOOD ’79 & BRIAN WOOD ’79 LIANNE G. THOMPSON & RALPH E. WYATT ’61 JUDY B. & RICHARD T. YERIAN ’65 *Donations made in fiscal year 2017

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$100 - $999 LINDA A. & STEVEN J. ABERNATHY ’71 DAVID R. ALLEN PATRICIA RUNDT AUSTIN ’90 & RICHARD A. AUSTIN ERIC S. BAKER ’01 JILL D. WISEMAN-BALD & JOACHIM BALD KAREN L. ’89 & CRAIG A. BARTON ’89 JANE A. BOUBEL STEPHEN C. BOUGHTON ’73 KAREN BOYD LORENA & GARY BROWN IVAN E. BROWN ’65 PHILLIP BROWN CATHERINE R. & JOHN E. BUCK ’76 JOANNE M. BUMP JOHN S. BURLES ’69 FRANCISCO J. CALVO-AMODIO ROBERT D. CAMPBETT ’61 MARY JO CAPPS ’44 ANNE HSIAO-YUEN WANG ’83 & DICK CASALI ’00 L. IVAN CHILD ’56 ANDREW M. CHUNG ’71 ANDREW J. CIHONSKI ’11 PAMELA RENEE DESHON-STEPP ’89 & DAVID M. STEPP DIMMER FAMILY FOUNDATION DIANE H. ’72 & DOUGLAS W. DUFRESNE ’68 CATHERINE A. ’93 & JOHN F. DUMMER ’94 ILA U. & PETER A. EELLS ’80 CHINWEIKE I. ESEONU FESTO T. EARLINE MILLSAPS & ROBIN L. FEUERBACHER ’74 CHERI M. & ALAN E. FISCHBACH ’66 FLIR SYSTEMS, INC. ELIZABETH G. & MICHAEL E. GARFINKEL YUN GE ’99 SUSAN & RICHARD W. HALSTEN ’65 JOANNE R. & MORGAN L. HANSCOM ’80 ALICE M. & DONALD F. HAYS ’51 ANN M. HINMAN ’88 DONNA GIBBONS HOY & CARL D. HOY ’89 M. LINDA & LARRY B. ILCEWICZ ’80 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION SUE WEST JOHNSON ’61 & DOUGLAS E. JOHNSON ’60 DEBRA L. & KENNETH I. JOHNSON ’86 BETTY L. & WILLIAM JUNELL ROBERT KELLY ABIGAIL WALKER KIMERLING ’01 & THOMAS E. KIMERLING ’01 ROBERT L. KINSEL ’60 BILL D. KONG ’51 KIM KONO NELLIE & JOHN KOOPMANS TERRY D. LAWRENCE ’71 SHARRON & JAMES C. LEONARD ’64

FOREFRONT

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FALL 2017