Healthcare - KPMG

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Healthcare: Reaching out to the masses

PanIIT Conclave 2010

kpmg.com/in

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Introduction Current state of healthcare in India

Over the last few decades, there has been a tremendous improvement in the quality of healthcare services in India. This is illustrated by the significant improvement in healthcare indicators such as life expectancy at birth, infant mortality rates, maternal mortality rate, etc. over this period.

Life expectancy at birth (years)

1990

2008

Male

Female

Male

Female

57

58

63

66

Source: World Health Statistics 2010

Infant mortality rate Per 1000 live births

1994

2008

74

53

Source: National Health Profile 2009

Maternal mortality ratio Per 100000 live-births

1999-01

2004-06

327

254

Source: National Health Profile 2009

The improvement in the healthcare indicators is a direct result of the improved penetration of healthcare services in terms of the increase in the number of government and private hospitals in India. There is a noted increase in the number of allopathic doctors with recognized medical qualifications, who have registered with state medical councils.

Number of Physicians (Allopathic)

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

660856

682080

708043

736743

757377

Source: National Health Profile 2009

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It has been observed that there is a widespread effort to improve the accessibility of healthcare amenities to every strata of society. The fact that a major part of India is rural cannot be ignored and indispensable services such as healthcare need to be made available to all.

In spite of this significant development, considerable gaps continue to exist in the demand for and supply of quality healthcare. This paper highlights these gaps through: I. International benchmarking II. Identifying the urban – semi-urban and rural disparity III.Identifying the inter-state disparity.

Demand and supply analysis I: International benchmarking India rates poorly on even the basic healthcare indicators when benchmarked against not just the developed economies, but also against the other BRIC nations. This can be attributed to the poor healthcare infrastructure reflected in the low bed density ratio, low doctor density ratio, and poor healthcare spending.

Developed Economies

Emerging Economies

Indicator

Year

India

US

UK

Japan

Brazil

Russia

China

Life expectancy at birth (years)

2008

64

78

80

83

73

68

74

Infant mortality rate (probability of dying by age 1 per 1000 live births)

2008

52

7

5

3

18

9

18

Maternal mortality rate (per 100000 births)

2000-09

254

13

7

3

77

24

34

Hospital bed density (per 10000 population)

2000-09

9

31

39

139

24

97

30

Doctor density (per 10000 population)

2000-09

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