Humanitarian crises, emergency preparedness and response - OCHA

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Humanitarian crises, emergency preparedness and response: the role of business and the private sector

Final report Steven A. Zyck and Randolph Kent

July 2014

HPG Humanitarian Policy Group

About the authors Steven A. Zyck is a Research Fellow at the Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) at the Overseas Development Institute. Randolph Kent is the Director of the Humanitarian Futures Programme (HFP) at King’s College London.

Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank all of the key stakeholders who provided information and insights for this report in Kenya, Jordan, Indonesia, Haiti, the United States, the United Kingdom, Switzerland and elsewhere. We are grateful to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), which helped to inspire and facilitate this project. We would particularly like to acknowledge the support provided by Helena Fraser, Karen Smith, Charlotta Benedek and Antoine Gerard from OCHA. The research team is also grateful for support provided by Andrew Andrea of the World Economic Forum (WEF) and members of the WEF Global Agenda Council on Catastrophic Risk. This study would not have been possible without support from the UK Department for International Development (DFID). Nick Harvey of DFID provided crucial inputs into this project from design to completion. Feedback on drafts of this report was provided by those individual noted above as well as by several independent reviewers. The findings were also refined through discussions with the participants in a Futures Workshop on the role of the business community in emergency response and preparedness in London in March 2014. Lastly, this reports builds on research – conducted as part of the project on ‘Humanitarian crises, emergency preparedness and response: the roles of business and the private sector’, which was led by Sara Pantuliano of the Humanitarian Policy Group at ODI and Randolph Kent of the Humanitarian Futures Programme at King’s College London. The project involved Vantage Partners, a Boston-based consultancy, and key members of its staff, particularly Jessica Wadd and Chris Hubbard. Case studies and background research for this study were conducted by Jim Drummond, Nicholas Crawford, Joanne Burke, Lilianne Fan, Justin Armstrong and Veronique Barbelet. Expert editing of this report was provided by Matthew Foley. The views presented in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of ODI or our partners.

Humanitarian Policy Group Overseas Development Institute 203 Blackfriars Road London SE1 8NJ United Kingdom Tel. +44 (0) 20 7922 0300 Fax. +44 (0) 20 7922 0399 E-mail: [email protected] Website: http://www.odi.org/hpg ISBN: 978 1 909464 82 7 © Overseas Development Institute, 2014 Readers are encouraged to quote or reproduce materials from this publication but, as copyright holders, ODI requests due acknowledgement and a copy of the publication. This and other HPG Reports are available from www.odi.org.uk/hpg.

Contents Acronyms

1

Executive summary

1

1 Introduction

5 6 8

1.1 Methodology and data collection 1.2 Outline of the report

2

The role of business in emergency response and preparedness 2.1 Private sector involvement in humanitarian crises: a brief history 2.2 Where does private sector engagement stand today?

3

4

9 9 9

The benefits of and barriers to private sector engagement for humanitarian action

15

3.1 Benefits of private sector involvement in humanitarian action 3.2 Barriers to collaboration

15 17

Practical recommendations for promoting private sector engagement

21 21 22 24

4.1 Rapidly implementable recommendations 4.2 Medium-term operational recommendations 4.3 Strategic recommendations

5

iii

Conclusion: bus