Improving food security - OECD.org

Dec 1, 2011 - Ethiopia or land titles in Peru did not improve access to credit but encouraged farmers to invest in agriculture. ...... irrigation and access to credit had improved food security access and stability over the year. Credit for ...... farmer income by organising the export of sesame, groundnut, sunflower, and paprika,.
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IOB Study Improving food security A systematic review of the impact of interventions in agricultural production, value chains, market regulation, and land security

Improving food security | IOB Study | no. 363 | Improving food security | IOB Study | no. 363 | Improving food security | IOB Study | no. 363 | Improving

IOB Study Improving food security A systematic review of the impact of interventions in agricultural production, value chains, market regulation, and land security

December 2011

Improving food security

Preface Since the publication of the World Development Report on ‘Agriculture for Development’ in 2008 and the growing concerns about the effects of rising food prices in subsequent years, food security has gained renewed interest from the international donor community. Consequently, the Dutch government has planned for substantially more emphasis on food security in its development cooperation for the period 2012-2015. The Policy and Operations Evaluation Department (IOB) of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs has taken the initiative for conducting this systematic review of food security interventions, with the objective to inform policy makers on the available evidence regarding the effectiveness of different types of policy instruments. The main research question of this review is: ‘what is the evidence for, and nature of, the impact of development interventions on food security in developing countries?’ The review is focused on four themes that are likely to contribute to food security, particularly interventions in the areas of agricultural production, value chains, market regulations, and land tenure security. The format of a systematic review was selected to enable a careful selection of cases that satisfy the criteria for a sound empirical counterfactual analysis, thus excluding many interesting albeit not conclusive other evaluation studies. From the initial search of more than 300 studies published since 2001, only 38 studies finally qualified for inclusion. The results from the selected case studies have been enriched with information from literature reviews in order to complement and balance the limited information base. The execution of this systematic review has been undertaken by IOB within the framework of an agreement with the OECD-DAC Evaluation Network (EvalNet) to enhance the availability of evidence-based information in key policy areas that can be helpful to support the use of evaluation outcomes for informed policy-making. In addition to other international efforts to improve access to systematic information and evidence regarding development effectiveness, this review is meant to inform program and policy design in developing cooperation in the area of food security. This review does not pretend to deliver generic conclusions regarding which interventions have worked best and what interventions are most recommended to improve food security. Successes in the past were often the result of combined interventions that matched a specific context. Rather, by presenting much of the information in a disaggregated form, the review draws attention to specific sets of constraints and opportunities that need to be considered for generating impact in any particular area or country, thus asking attention for the requirements for tailor-made sets of interventions. The study has been conducted by dr. Ferko Bodnár and dr. Bart de Steenhuijsen Piters (Royal Tropical Institute, KIT - Amsterdam), with assistance from Jisse Kranen (IOB research assistant) contributing to the search and first selection of the evaluation reports and other review documents. The study has been accompanied by dr. Henri Jorritsma, deputy director of the Policy and Operations Evaluation Department (IOB) of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs

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Preface

and prof dr. Eric Smaling, director of the Development Policy and Practice Department of the Royal Tropical Institute. Comments on the draft report were received from dr. ir. Prem Bindra