Integrating REDD+ into a green economy transition: opportunities and ...

an integrated database of licenses on forest and peatland created further challenges for planning, with inconsistencies and overlaps with concession areas being found. The one map initiative aims to develop one database of information across sectors and levels to improve sharing of information; facilitate cross-sectoral ...
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Report June 2013

Integrating REDD+ into a green economy transition Opportunities and challenges Charlene Watson, Emily Brickell and Will McFarland, ODI with contributions by Jeff McNeely, IUCN

UN-REDD P R O G R A M M E

U NEP

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Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful for the review comments and feedback received from Ed Barbier (University of Wyoming), Tim Christophersen (UNEP), Thomas Enters (UNEP), Jane Feehan (European Investment Bank), Julie Greenwalt (UNEP), Val Kapos (UNEP- World Conservation Monitoring Centre), Lera Miles (UNEP-World Conservation Monitoring Centre), Robert Munroe (UNEP- World Conservation Monitoring Centre), Leo Peskett, and Fulai Sheng (UNEP). Feedback from Tom Mitchell, Smita Nakhooda, Andrew Scott and Steve Wiggins at ODI, is also much appreciated. The authors retain responsibility for all conclusions and errors of interpretation. ODI gratefully acknowledges the support of UNEP and the UN-REDD programme in providing funding to produce this report.

June 2013

Report

Integrating REDD+ into a green economy transition Opportunities and challenges Charlene Watson, Emily Brickell and Will McFarland, ODI, With contributions by Jeff McNeely, International Union for the Conservation of Nature

 Clear links exist between REDD+ and green economy objectives, both of which call for a change in the business-as-usual economic development in order to slow the loss of natural capital;  Although an aggregate value is elusive, the multiple benefits of REDD+ provide a clear rationale for the integration of REDD+ in a green economy transition. This includes the enhanced provision of ecosystem services, in addition to climate change mitigation, and the potential to deliver various social benefits;  Although challenges remain, integrating REDD+ within a green economy transition could maximise synergies in policy and planning, as well as reduce the transaction and implementation costs of pursing each independently.

Please contact Charlene Watson: [email protected]

Shaping policy for development

odi.org

Executive summary

The concept of a green economy that ‘results in improved human well-being and social equity, while significantly reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcities’ is gathering support (UNEP, 2011a). The role of forests and land use in the context of natural capital is included in growing discussions of a transition to a green economy (e.g. OECD, 2011; World Bank, 2012). However, the full potential of REDD+ – reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, conservation of forest carbon stocks, sustainable management of forests, and enhancement of forest carbon stocks – is rarely elaborated (see UNEP, 2011b; Sukhdev et al., 2010). As REDD+ aims to address market, policy, and institutional failures that undervalue the climate change mitigation service provided by the forest ecosystem, while protecting the rights of those who rely on the forests, there are clear links between REDD+ objectives and green economy objectives, both of which call for a change in the business-as-usual economic development in order to slow the loss of natural capital. This paper outlines a rationale for integrating REDD+ within the green economy transition and initiates thinking on how this might be achieved. It brings together the existing literature to consolidate conceptual issues, presents key examples of progress, and highlights the potential challenges and opportunities of including REDD+ in the transition to a green economy. Intended to support the discussions of the Global Symposium on REDD+ in a Green Economy, held in Indonesia in June 2013, the target audience of this paper is the communities of practice both in REDD+ and green economy; this includes policy-makers, civil society organisations and academia.

A clear rationale for REDD+ integration in a gr