Japanese Sea Power - A Maritime Nation's ... - Royal Australian Navy

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FOUNDATIONS OF INTERNATIONAL THINKING ON SEA POWER

No. 2

A MARITIME NATION’S STRUGGLE FOR IDENTITY NAOKO SAJIMA AND KYOICHI TACHIKAWA This work examines the highs and lows of Japanese sea power. From the earliest times the sea was used as a means of communication and as a practical aid for the consolidation of Japanese national power, but many medieval and early modern Japanese leaders preferred isolation to engagement. From the late 1850s Japan developed an oceanic navy capable of defeating rival Pacific naval powers, however that imperial navy ultimately outgrew Japan’s national capacity and during World War II the destruction of Japanese sea power ultimately led to the defeat and occupation of Japan itself. Since 1951 Japan has re-engaged with the global economic community while remaining dependent upon international sea communications and the United States Forces in Japan. The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force is confirmation of contemporary Japanese sea power and it has again become an important contributor to national policy, while the future application of sea power is hotly debated in Japan today.

SEA POWER CENTRE - AUSTRALIA

DPS FEB007/09

NAOKO SAJIMA AND KYOICHI TACHIKAWA

This is the second volume in the Foundations of International Thinking on Sea Power series. It brings historical and contemporary evidence together to help inform readers interested in maritime affairs but it also should help to improve our understanding of the modern Japanese nation. Naoko Sajima and Kyoichi Tachikawa are leaders in their field who have used an extensive array of English and Japanese languages sources to prepare this volume.

JAPANESE SEA POWER: A MARITIME NATION’S STRUGGLE FOR IDENTITY

JAPANESE SEA POWER

JAPANESE SEA P OW ER

A MARITIME NATION’S STRUGGLE FOR IDENTITY

N AO KO S AJ I M A AN D KYO I C H I TAC H I KAWA

JAPANESE SEA POWER A M A R I T I M E N ATI O N ’ S S T RU G G L E F O R I D E N T I T Y

© Copyright Commonwealth of Australia 2009 This work is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of study, research, criticism or review, as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, and with standard source credit included, no part may be reproduced without written permission. Enquiries should be addressed to the Director, Sea Power Centre — Australia, Department of Defence, Canberra ACT 2600.

National Library of Australian Cataloguing-in-Publication entry Japanese Sea Power: A Maritime Nation’s Struggle for Identity Sajima, N (Naoko), 1959 -. Tachikawa, K (Kyoichi), 1966 -. ISSN 1835-7679 ISBN 978-0-642-29705-1

JAPANESE SEA POWER A M A R I T I M E N ATI O N ’ S S T RU G G L E F O R I D E N T I T Y

by Naoko Sajima and Kyochi Tachikawa

Sea Power Centre – Australia

Disclaimer The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Government of Australia, the Department of Defence and the Royal Australian Navy. In addition, the views expressed do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Government of Japan, the Ministry of Defense, or the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force. The Commonwealth of Australia will not be legally responsible in contract, tort or otherwise for any statement made in this publication.

Sea Power Centre – Australia The Sea Power Centre — Australia (SPC-A), was established to undertake activities to promote the study, discussion and awareness of maritime issues and strategy within the RAN and the Defence and civil communities at large. The mission of the SPC-A is: • to promote understanding of sea power and its application to the security of Australia’s national interests • to manage the development of RAN doctrine and facilitate its incorporation into ADF joint doctrine • to contribute to regional engagement • within the higher Defence organisation, contribute to the devel