LANGUAGE AND LITERACY DEVELOPMENT Early Childhood ...

... in whole or in part with funds from the Oregon Department of Education .... Literacy: The Creative Curriculum Approach; Cate Heroman and Candy Jones.
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LANGUAGE AND LITERACY DEVELOPMENT Birth to Three

Early Childhood Foundation: Listening and Understanding Children gain information and understanding by observing, listening and responding to home language and English by: • Responding to sounds in the environment • Responding interactively with others • Recognizing and responding to the meaning of familiar words • Following simple or routine directions

Indicators: Observable Behaviors

The Child ¾ Smiles at person who talks or gestures to him/her. ¾ Waits for adult to take a turn in simple turn-taking routines, such as making sounds or pounding on the table. ¾ Responds with appropriate gestures to greetings/salutations, such as “bye bye”. ¾ Recognizes names of familiar objects, such as bottle or “binkie”. ¾ Responds to “give me” by relinquishing the object. ¾ Retrieves a familiar object on request from an adult. The Adult ¾ Engages children in back and forth communicating. ¾ Pairs words with actions and objects during play activities and daily routines. ¾ Follows child’s lead, commenting on the child’s actions and sounds. ¾ Engages children in songs, rhymes, finger plays and stories. ¾ Names and describes people, things and actions. ¾ Expands on child’s language and answers questions. ¾ Encourages parents to develop and maintain their first language in the home.

Supportive Learning Environments Include ¾ Stories, songs, words and games in English and non-English ¾ Durable cloth, board or vinyl books, soft toys and puppets which are accessible throughout the day ¾ Sturdy board, vinyl and cloth books, photo albums and magazines with pictures

This product is made possible in whole or in part with funds from the Oregon Department of Education and the Department of Employment, Child Care Division. May 2007

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LANGUAGE AND LITERACY Birth to Three

Early Childhood Foundation: Speaking and Communicating Children use non-verbal communication and language in home language to express needs, wants and ideas by: • Using sounds or body movements to communicate • Using words to communicate • Initiating and participating in conversations and thoughts • Using a growing vocabulary • Using multi-word sentences

Indicators: Observable Behaviors

The Child ¾ Requests continued actions of a toy or activity through body movements, eye contact or vocalizations. ¾ Indicates preferences such as “no more” by turning or pushing away or raising arms to be picked up. ¾ Uses single words to request information. ¾ Answers and asks simple questions. ¾ Labels objects and people. ¾ Uses two-word sentences that combine two concepts or thoughts, such as “daddy go” or “eat cookie”. ¾ Uses plurals. The Adult ¾ Uses alternate ways to communicate when needed (gestures, sign language). ¾ Builds on interests to introduce new words and ideas during play. ¾ Engages child in back and forth conversations or interactions. ¾ Understands that crying or acting out is a child’s way of communicating wants and needs. ¾ Provides opportunities for children to engage in conversation. ¾ Responds to toddler’s cues and communications.

Supportive Learning Environments Include ¾ Materials that encourage face to face interactions (books, puppets, dolls

and mirrors) ¾ Pictures of children and their families (books and photos)

This product is made possible in whole or in part with funds from the Oregon Department of Education and the Department of Employment, Child Care Division. May 2007

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LANGUAGE AND LITERACY DEVELOPMENT Birth to Three

Early Childhood Foundation: Phonological Awareness Children use sounds in a variety of contexts by: • Imitating sounds and words • Making oral rhymes or identifying syllables in spoken words • Hearing beginning sounds and ending sounds in words • Listening and telling differences in phonemes (smallest parts of sound in a spoken word)

Indicators: Observable Behaviors The Child ¾ Imitates so