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Toby: The two quickest ways to start Microsoft Word 2010 are to select it from the Start Menu or to double click a ..... is downloaded from Microsoft and soon our New Document is ready to work on. We can see that several parts ...... the Document Inspector we're not going to use, Custom .xml Data is one of them. But let's do.
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Learn Microsoft Word 2010

Table of Contents Chapter 1 – Getting Started Getting Started in Word 2010 ..................................................................................6 Learning the Workspace – Part 1 .............................................................................9 Learning the Workspace – Part 2 ...........................................................................12 Create New Document, Using Templates, and Page Setup ...................................14 Converting and Saving Documents .......................................................................16 Chapter 2 – Editing Selecting Text; Cut, Copy, Paste; Find & Replace ................................................19 Insert/Overtype; Navigation Pane; Find & Replace ..............................................22 Hyphenation, Auto-Correct, and Redo ..................................................................24 Chapter 3 – Formatting Text Formatting .....................................................................................................26 Paragraph Formatting.............................................................................................28 Formatting with Bullets, Indents, Borders, Shading ..............................................31 Chapter 4 – Templates Creating/Saving New Template; Changing Styles ................................................33 Managing, Modifying and Deleting New Styles ...................................................36 Working with/Using Themes .................................................................................38 Chapter 5 – Graphics Inserting/Formatting ClipArt, Pictures ..................................................................40

Using Picture Tools & New Features ....................................................................43 Inserting Screenshots, Using WordArt ..................................................................45 Using SmartArt, SmartArt Tools ...........................................................................47 Chapter 6 – Tables Inserting Tables; Adding Text; Selecting Parts of Tables .....................................49 Formatting Tables; Table Tools .............................................................................52 Chapter 7 – Charts Inserting Charts; Chart Tools .................................................................................55 Creating Charts with Pre-existing Data .................................................................57 Chapter 8 – Desktop Publishing Adding Drop Caps, Watermarks, Borders, Page Colors ........................................60 Using/Formatting Multi-Columns; Text Boxes .....................................................63 Inserting/Resizing Shapes ......................................................................................66 Stacking, Grouping Objects ...................................................................................69 Chapter 9 – Long Document Features Creating Outline, Sub-Documents .........................................................................72 Expand/Collapse Sections; Document Properties; Cover Pages ...........................75 Add Table of Contents: Header & Footer Tools; Quick Parts ..............................78 Chapter 10 – Technical Documents Line-numbering, Adding Bibliography & Index ...................................................81 Understanding Formatting Marks; Sections Features ............................................84

Inserting Symbols, Equations, Auto-Text, Building Blocks..................................87 Inserting Footnotes, Bookmarks, Cross-references ...............................................90 Chapter 11 – Mail Merge Setting up Mail Merge Using Wizard ....................................................................93 Manual Mail Merge Set-up ....................................................................................96 Chapter 12 – Proofing & Printing Spelling/Grammar Check.......................................................................................98 Using Thesaurus, Research Option, Translate; Printing Document ....................102 Chapter 13 – Publishing to Web Publishing & Accessing Word Documents on Web ............................................105 Chapter 14 – Protecting Document & Computer Using Document Inspector, Password Protect, Editing Restrictions ...................108 Chapter 15 – Reviewing & Sharing Reviewing, Sharing and Leaving/Adding Comments .........................................111 Chapter 16 – Customizing Word Customizing with Word Options .........................................................................114 Chapter 17 – Expanding Word Expanding Word Functionality; Using Macros ...................................................117 Chapter 18 – Other Features Importing/Exporting, Embedding Document to Other Programs ........................119 Chapter 19 – Problems & Maintenance

Check for Updates, Safe Mode ............................................................................124

Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

Chapter 1 – Getting Started Video: Getting Started in Word 2010 Toby: The two quickest ways to start Microsoft Word 2010 are to select it from the Start Menu or to double click a shortcut icon if there is one on your Desktop. First, let’s start it from the Start Menu. If you look in All Programs you’ll find it in the Microsoft Office Group. Once it’s started, you’ll usually see an empty document with the cursor flashing in the corner. We’re ready to start typing, but not just yet. First, I’m going to Close Word using the Close button in the top right hand corner of the screen. Now, let’s Open it using the shortcut on my Desktop. It just needs a double click. Let’s Close it down again. This time we’ll the File Menu Option and then select Exit. It does just the same job as the Close button. Word often provides a number of ways of doing things. We can each choose the way that suits us best. What if I don’t have a shortcut on my Desktop? Easy. Find Word again using the Start Menu, right click on the mouse, then select Send To Desktop, Create Shortcut. Now I’ve got two. We’re now looking at an empty document in the Word window. There is some very important tools in this window and we’re going to quickly look around them now. We’ll look at all of them in detail later. In the center of the page is the document window containing the active document, the one we’re working on. If you’ve been using Word 2007 before, you’ll wonder where the Office button is. Well, it’s still here but it’s had a makeover. Click File in the corner. Click File again to Close it. The Status Bar displays information about the active document. There’s not much to say about it at the moment. It’s got no words. The Ribbon contains Commands and Tools grouped by category into Tabs. At the bottom right, we have the Zoom Controls. These are really useful for zooming in or out to get a better view of our document. Just to the left of the Zoom Controls are the View buttons. We can switch between the different ways of looking at our document.

We also have a little Tool Bar in the top left of the

Workspace. That’s called the Quick Access Tool Bar. This can be customized to our own requirements. When we’re using Word we often need some extra help to do a job. Word is great at providing that help. For some Tasks it provides a Task Pane. For example, if we want to work with Styles

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Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

in our document, we can choose the Styles Task Pane Launcher. As we’ll see later, this Task Pane gives us access to many tools we can use in our work. One of the great things about Task Panes is that you can move them around the Workspace and put them somewhere convenient. Click on the Header until a four-headed arrow appears, then use the left mouse button to drag the Pane around. Let go wherever you want to; although that’s probably not a good place to leave it. I’ll move it again. Then Close it using the cross in the top right hand corner. You can also Resize a Task Pane. Just hover over one edge until you see a two-headed arrow, left click, and move the edge to make the Pane larger or smaller. It’s easy with a little practice. We’ve been looking at the Word Workspace. Now we’re going to start looking at a document. There are a few ways of opening an existing document. One we’ll use a lot is to Re-open a document we’ve worked on recently and that’s what we’re going to do now. We use the File button to access Backstage View. This is one of the features that was introduced in Word 2010. We’ll spend a lot of time on Backstage View later, but for now we’re going to just look at the recent document facility. One of the documents in the list is one I was working on earlier. So let’s take a look at that now. Word displays the contents of a document in different ways to help us to work efficiently. Let’s look at some of those options using the View buttons. Full-screen Reading View displays the full screen and removes most distractions. It’s a comfortable way to read a document. It also provides a number of options, such as the option to Mark Comments on the document as we read. We can switch between viewing one or two pages at a time using the View Options Menu. When we finish reading we Close the View. Web Layout View displays the document as it would appear on the web. Saving documents for use on the web is a topic for later. Outline View is a very useful way of seeing the structure of the document with Headings and Subheadings. In this View, each Heading has a symbol next to it that you can click on to Expand or Collapse the content under the Heading. Let’s see how that works. Draft View is on the last button. This displays the document as one long piece of paper with perforation marks separating the pages. This is fine for typing the content in, but we don’t normally use it for Preview, Markup, or Printing. Now let’s go back to the first button which switches us to Print Layout View. This is the one we’ll usually work on during this course. It’s the best one for Previewing our work before Printing.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

Video: Learning the Workspace – Part 1 Toby: Now we’re going to look at some of the ways we can make the Word Workspace really help us out. It’s really worth spending some time to find out about these features. So let’s get started.

The Status Bar provides useful information about Word and the document we’re

currently working on. For example, it shows the number of words. It can also be Customized. If I right click anywhere over the Status Bar I see a list of options. For example, we can turn off the Zoom Slider and show the current Line-number. Not all of these would show me something at the moment. For example, I’m not Tracking Changes at the moment, but I will find this sort of information useful later. When Word starts, the Quick Access Tool Bar normally appears at the top of the window. You can Customize this Tool Bar by adding items to it. You can also move it. If you click the Control at the right hand end of the Quick Access Tool Bar, you will see a list of Standard Command buttons. The ones that are ticked are the ones that are currently on the Tool Bar. Let’s add a button to Open an existing document. You can now see an Open Command button on the Tool Bar. It’s just as easy to remove a button from the Tool Bar. Another way to Customize the Tool Bar is to add it from the Ribbon. Let me show you how. On the Home Tab there is a button to make text Bold. It’s the button with the heavy “B” on it. If I right click this button, I see an option to Add it to the Quick Access Tool Bar; couldn’t be easier. You can move the Quick Access Tool Bar below the Ribbon if you find it easier. Some people prefer it there. There’s certainly room to add plenty of buttons. But let’s put it back to where it was. And here’s a neat feature. Select the arrow to the right of the Quick Access Tool Bar again. This time select More Commands. Now you can see the Word Options Dialogue. The panel on the left shows the Commands that are available to be added to the Tool Bar. The panel on the right shows the ones that are all ready on it. Select a Command in either panel and press Add or Remove to get just the Commands you want. You can also use it to move the Tool Bar. When we’re done, we click OK. One useful feature of Word is the ability to split the current view to produce two working areas. Select View on the Ribbon then click Split. Finally, click to fix that Split Bar. We now have two Views of the same document and we can work on either. This can be really useful when

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Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

we’re working on a Long Document and don’t want to keep moving backwards and forwards. When we finish with the extra Pane we just drag it off the Workspace. Now let’s tie a few clever things together. Let’s Split this window and look at two separate Sections of our document. Remember how? On the View Tab click Split and click to confirm. Now let’s click in the upper window and use the Zoom Slider that we talked about earlier. Now let’s select the Bottom View, but this time we’re going to use the Zoom Command button on the Ribbon. This gives us a few different ways of zooming, but it also gives us an option to view many pages in one window. Let’s try that. Click OK and we can see both of our document pages in one window. Let’s use the Zoom Command to set it back to a single page with a Zoom of 100% again. Finally in this module we’re going to take a look at Help. No matter how much we know about it all like Word, we all have questions at some time. The Office Help facilities can answer most of our questions. So it’s important to know what the facilities are and how to make the best use of them. Many of the help facilities from Microsoft Word 2010 are available to you all the time, but to get the most extensive range of help you need to be connected to the internet. In this module, we’re going to look at the help available to us when we’re connected to the internet when we’re online. To access Help click the blue and white question mark icon near the top right corner of the screen. Now Close it using the Close button. Now press the F1 key. That does exactly the same job as the icon and it’s quick. You now have a number of options. For example, if you click on the Book icon on the little Tool Bar, you’ll see a Table of Contents appear. Let’s Close that for the moment. You can also Search for help. Let’s Search for help on Quick Access Tool Bar. Press the Magnifying Glass icon. We get a list of Hyperlinks to Help topics and articles. Let’s click on the first one. We can Maximize the Help window to make it easier to read. Scroll down and see just how much information there is. Great. The Help is Browser based so we can use the Back arrow button to go back to previous pages. We can also return the window to its normal size. There is a little Tool Bar in the Help window. We can Print Help if we need to using the Print icon or we can change the size of the Font to make it easier to read. It’s currently set at medium. I can go for largest or even smallest. There are many other ways of accessing help and we’re going to be covering those in later modules. For

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Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

now you know a couple of easy ways to access Help and you know how to use the Search facility. We have enough for now.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

Video: Learning the Workspace – Part 2 Toby: In this second part of our look at the Word Workspace, we’re going to review some of the most important tools that we need to use to work with Word. Firstly, we’re going to look at some of the features of Dialog Boxes. One of the main functions of Dialog Boxes is to enable you to provide some more information before a Command is executed. For example, a Dialog Box opens when you click on one of the Launchers on the Ribbon. Let’s look at the Launcher on the bottom right of the Font Group on the Home Tab. Here we can choose or change options for the Font we’re going to use. If you Open the Dialog Box but decide not to make any changes or you make a mistake and want to start over just click on Cancel. If you point at the Launcher without clicking, you get a tip that shows you which box will Open if you click. Dialog Boxes have several types of content, usually called Controls. Let’s take a look at a couple of them. Under Font we have a List Control. We can use the Scroll Bar to the right to look through the available Fonts and choose the one we want. Clicking on a Font updates the Preview Control at the bottom. The Font Style and Size also use List Boxes. There is a group of Controls in the middle of the Dialog Box that are called Check Boxes. These let us turn an option on or off. For example, we can apply Strikethrough to some text. When we’ve made our selections in a Dialog Box we click OK and they’re applied to our document. Let’s now select a few words of Text and see how that works. Open the Dialog Box and change the Font and Size and specify Strikethrough. Click on OK and you can see the effect of our changes. But I don’t really like that so let’s use Undo on the Quick Access Tool Bar. We’ll be using Dialog Boxes a lot from now on, so we can cover their features in more detail as we go along. Now, we’re going to look at some of the ways we can find our way around a document. This becomes more important as our documents get longer. There is some fundamental things we do time and again. So let’s look at some of those now. First of all we need to be able to Scroll through a document to find a particular place in it that we want to work in or just read. Use the Scroll Bar at the right for this. Grab the Scroll Box with the left mouse button and move it up or down or click the single arrows at the ends of the Scrollbar to move one line at a time or click above or below the Scroll Box to move several lines at a time or you may have a Scroll button on your mouse that lets you Scroll through a document. You can also Scroll through a document using the Page Up and Page Down buttons on your keyboard. If you hold the Control key while

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Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

you press Page Up or Page Down, you actually move one document page at a time. You’ll use those two Keyboard Shortcuts a lot. Another very important pair of Keyboard Shortcuts is to hold down the Control key and press the Home key which takes you to the beginning of your document or hold down the Control key and press End to get to the end of your document. And finally there’s a tiny little Toolbar that can really make you work like a pro. Near the bottom of the screen, on the right, is a button that brings up the Select Browse Object Tool Bar; more on that later. Now we’re going to look at one of the most important new features in Word 2010. Backstage View. It replaces the Microsoft Office button in some earlier versions of Word, such as 2007 and the File button in others, such as 2000. What is it? Well, it’s where we manage our Files, that is our documents and the Data about them. To quote Microsoft, “Backstage View is where you do everything to a File that you don’t do in the File.” To get to Backstage View you click the File Tab in the top left corner of the Workspace. Close it by clicking File again. Let’s look at the main options. We’ll cover many of them in detail later. Backstage View is where we Save, Open, and Close Files. It also provides information about the File that’s currently open. This includes information about other Users access permissions and version history, and some properties of the Files, such as the number of pages and the number of words in the document. Backstage View gives us access to the Print facilities, such as choice of Printer and the size of paper that we need to use. As we’ll see later, Backstage View also lets us use the Sharing facilities of Word that have been significantly improved in Word 2010. Backstage View gives us another way into Words Help facilities. And finally Backstage View provides access to the Word Options Dialog where the facilities include Proofing, including Spell Checking and Grammar Checking, Language Settings, facilities to customize the Ribbon, and as we’ve all ready seen, to customize the Quick Access Tool Bar. Access to the Trust Center enables us to control safety and security. We’ll be relying on Backstage View a lot from now on.

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Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

Video: Create New Document, Using Templates, and Page Setup Toby: At last it’s time to Create our very own document. Thanks for being so patient. To Create our first New Document, we’re going to use just about the simplest method there is. Open Backstage View, click on New, and then Blank Document. We have blank sheet of paper on the screen with a cursor flashing in the corner. We can just start typing into the document and away we go. That’s all there is to it. One other very simple option is to Create a New Document based on an existing one. Let’s use Backstage View again but this time after we select New, we’ll choose New from Existing. Now find the document we want in the Documents Folder and click Create New. We now have that document as our starting point. It looks the same as before but at the top of the Workspace we can see that it’s been given a new name. When we Save the document we can give it the name we want; more on that later. Now we’re going to look at a real timesaver, Word Templates. We’re going to Create a New Document again, but this time we’re going to Create a document from a Template. A Template is a sort of document pattern. Often with some of the content filled in to help us to get started. If I use Backstage View and select New, as usual, I can see a lot of options related to Templates. If I’ve Created or Copied and Saved some Templates of my own already, I can use My Templates to access them. Word 2010 provides some Standard Templates and we can access them using the Sample Templates button. We’re using a Browser here, so we can always use the Back button to go back to make a different selection. Recent Templates lets us use a recently used Template again. Microsoft also offers a selection of Templates online. There is even a facility to Search the available online Templates for one that might do the job. Lets Search on Fax. Word displays a selection of Templates we could use. When we select the one we want to try, it is downloaded from Microsoft and soon our New Document is ready to work on. We can see that several parts of the document are marked to indicate that we need to type something in there. For example, next to Fax we need to enter the number we want the document Faxed to. These are Fields and as we’ll see later, these are a very important feature of Word. For now, let’s just type into those Fields and get our Fax ready to send.

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Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

For every document I produce, Page Setup is important. However, every document might need a different Page Setup. To achieve the look I want I might use a Standard Paper Size such as Legal, Letter, or Envelope. Or I might choose one of the International Paper Sizes such as A4. I can even use a Custom Size as long as my Printer will accept it. To Setup the page I use the Page Layout Tab on the Ribbon. This document has its Paper Size set to A4. If I select Size, I can see that selection. I’m going to change the Paper Size to A3 for a much bigger page. I don’t often use such big paper so I’ll change it back to A4. Another important aspect of Layout is Orientation. We’re looking at a page which has a Portrait Orientation. With the Orientation option I can change that to Landscape. It’s not quite so easy to see this so let me use the Zoom Slider so that you can see the effect of that a little more easily. With the Orientation option in the Page Setup group, I can easily change back to Portrait. Another important aspect to Page Setup is the number of columns on a page. This document has one column. If I use the Columns Control, I can make it a two column document. Note that this is not the same as putting a Table on the page. I can combine this with changing it to a Landscape document. You can see how quickly and easily the overall Layout of the document can be changed. I’m going to change everything back to the way it was. There’s just one more thing to look at in this module. I can change the Margins in my document very easily. I’m going to choose Narrow Margins. I get a lot more Text on the paper, but it does look a bit crowded. If I select Wide Margins, I get plenty of space around the Text. This can be useful if I’m going to Print the document onto paper and mark it up in some way. I’ll change it back. This time I’ll use the Undo button. That’s just about it for Page Setup for now, although we will look at Line-numbers and Hyphenation later. As we’ve seen, the Page Setup of a document is very important. Other important features and properties include its Size, its Author, and so on. We’re now going to look at some of the information we can store about a document. We’re looking at the Word 2010 version of our document about Sydney. Access Backstage View, select Info, and on the right we can see some basic properties of the document; including the Author, the number of pages, and the number of words. If we click on Properties and then Advanced Properties we can see a Dialog with a number of Tabs, each of which lets us see or change some Document Properties. On the Summary Tab we can enter the Title. Let’s put “Long Weekend,” and Subject, enter “Sydney.” The Statistics Tab tells us a lot about the document itself. When we finish making changes we click OK to Save the Properties we’ve entered or changed.

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Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

Video: Converting and Saving Documents Toby: Welcome back. We need to know about some of the different types of Document that we may need to deal with. You may think that Microsoft Word will always knows about the documents we produce with it, but in fact it’s not quite as simple as that. Over the years the Format of Word’s Documents has changed and some older versions of Word can have trouble handling Documents that have been created with newer versions of Word, such as Word 2010. Other software also writes and reads Documents with different Formats and we need to be able to handle some of these as well. To get an idea of what we’re dealing with here let’s try to Open a Document from Backstage View. The Open Dialog lets us browse for a Document that we want. If we click on the arrow on the button near the bottom right hand corner, we get a list of File Types we can Open. By the way, the List in your Copy of Word may be a little different from mine. Near the beginning it says Word Documents and then in brackets star-dot-docx (*.docx). This is the File Type or Document Type, they mean the same here, that is the Standard for Word Documents created using Word 2007 or later and so is the current Standard Type. Further down it says Word 97-2003 Documents. This is the previous Standard File Type or Document Type. You’re very likely to come across documents of this type, as many older documents exist and plenty of people still use older versions of Word. As you can see, there are many other File Types. We’ll deal with some of them later. Let’s take a look at a document created using an earlier version of Word. I just happen to have one that I prepared earlier. Can you remember how to find the Open Dialog? That’s right, Backstage View and then Open. This Dialog is one we use a lot. We can browse our Document Library to find the ones we want. I’ve left the document we’re going to Open in the Documents Folder. So I’ll select that. Amongst the Files in that Library are a File with extension .doc and one with extension .docx. The one with the extension .doc has been created with an older version of Word. Let’s Open it. Look at the top of the Workspace. The name of the document is there but it has the words, “Compatibility Mode” after it. This means that Word is going to work on it in a way that is compatible with the older format. When we finished any changes and Save them, Word will make sure that the document can still be opened by older versions of Word. However, we may think it’s time we brought that document up to date; to do that we convert it to the new Format. An easy way to do that is to Save it in the new Format using Save

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Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

As. It’s Backstage View time again. This time select Save As. Look at the Save As Type Box. Select Word Document and note how the File Name has been changed to give it a .docx extension. Now click on Save. We get a warning box. This tells us that we’re about to Save our document in a newer Format which will have some advantages, such as being able to use all the features of newer versions of Word, but also some disadvantages such as possible Layout changes. Bearing in mind that we’ll still have the older version of the document anyway, Save As makes a new document in effect. Let’s click OK. Now let’s look at the Workspace. The document has a new name with a .docx extension and all signs of Compatibility Mode have gone. We’re bang up to date. Let’s make a small change or two to our document. Okay we finished. Let’s Close the document. A Dialog appears asking us if we want to Save our changes. We have three choices: Save will save our changes and Close the document; Don’t Save will Close the document without saving the changes; Cancel will abort the Close. We didn’t want to Close the document, maybe we’ve not really finished working on it. Let’s select Save. The document closes and our changes have been Saved. Can you remember how to open a recently edited document? Backstage View, Recent, and there it is. Clicking on that will Open the document. But before we do that let’s Pin it to the List. Pining is a neat feature. If we Pin a document to the Recent Documents List, it will stay there as long as we want it to. That’s great for Documents we work on a lot or that we often need to refer to. Having Pined it to the List, let’s Open it by clicking. Back to Recent and we can Un-pin it from the List by clicking on the icon. That’s a neat little feature. We’ve now seen a few ways Creating a New Document, Opening an existing document, Saving our changes, and Closing a document. We just have one more topic to cover before we start putting content into a document. One very useful feature of Word is it’s facility to check a document for issues. The sort of issues that it can check for include Hidden Text that you may have forgotten about or be unaware of, accessibility issues for people with disabilities, Document Properties or features that may be incompatible with earlier versions of Word. On the Info Page in Backstage View, there is a button to check for issues. If we press that and Inspect Document, we are advised to Save our document before the check is performed. Let’s do that now by clicking on Yes. We see the Document Inspectors checklist. The Default is for it to check for a

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Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

whole list of things. In some cases maybe I want it to perform particular checks. If this is the case, we can check or uncheck accordingly. I’m going to do a full check this time so I just click Inspect. The results of the Inspection include a warning about the Document Properties I’ve entered, notably the Author. Now Word isn’t saying that I shouldn’t specify an Author, it’s just warning me that the Author name is there and I might want to remove it. It’s my choice whether I do or not. If I want Word to remove the flagged information I can press Remove All. However, I’m okay with admitting that it’s me that wrote this document so I’ll just press Close. And finally I press Close in Backstage View to Close the document and then confirm that the changes should be Saved.

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Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

Chapter 2 – Editing Video: Selecting Text; Cut, Copy, Paste; Drag & Drop Toby: By now you should know quite a lot about Word 2010. You should know how to Open, Close, and Save documents. You should also know your way around Words Workspace. In fact, I think you’re ready to use some of that knowledge to produce some really cool documents. Let’s get started. Word is designed especially to work with Text. It’s now almost universally accepted as the number one software tool for Editing and presenting Text. In this chapter, we’re going to look in some detail at how to enter and Edit Text and how to use some of the powerful tools Word provides for processing our words, such as Find and Replace. We’re not going to worry too much about the presentation aspects, what we’ll call Formatting just yet. We’ll look at that in a little while. Let’s start with a Blank Document and put some Text into it first. Here’s a Blank Document. Let’s type some words. How about, “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.” I’m sorry my typing is a bit slow. Can you see on the Status Bar that there are nine words? Now I’m going to do something you’ll do a lot in Word. I’m going to Select the Text I’ve just typed. Now there are many ways of doing this and we all have different preferences. I’m going to use a very simple one here. Triple clicking on any of the words in the paragraph I’ve just typed Selects the whole paragraph.

Note how the Selected Text is

highlighted. Notice also the faint Tool Bar over the Selected Text; more on that later. For now I’m going to use one of the Command buttons on the Home Tab on the Ribbon to Copy my Text. If I hover over the buttons you can see which one I need. All of the Command buttons have Tool Tips enabled by Default. I press the Copy button but nothing seems to have happened. In fact, the Selected Text has been Copied to the Clipboard; a special part of the Word Workspace that’s usually hidden from view. Here I can keep things Text, Pictures, and so on that I might need later. My Text has been Copied in there, but it’s only a Copy. The original is still in my document. Now I’m going to click the mouse to the right of my sentence. Did you notice a Copy button is in the Clipboard Group on the Ribbon? In the same Group find the Paste button. Press the Paste button. Press it again and again. What I have just done is referred to as Copy and Paste. You’ll probably be doing a lot of Copy and Paste.

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We selected a paragraph of Text by triple clicking somewhere in it. There are many ways of Selecting Text and we’re going to look at a few more of them. One of the most general ones is to use the mouse. Go back to our original sentence, click to the left of it, and keep the left mouse button down. Now wipe over the first button until we get to the end of the sentence, just after the full stop. Release the mouse and you’ve got the whole sentence selected. Now click anywhere to Cancel the Selection. Let’s do that again but this time we’ll Select the first two sentences. You can always be sure what’s Selected by looking at the highlighting. There are some really neat ways of Selecting Text and there are so many that you might have trouble remembering them all. Most Word users settle on a few that they use a lot and find it easy to remember. The one I used just now is my favorite way of Selecting Text. So how do we find out about the others? Well, it’s time we took a look at Online Help again. Remember that we can bring up the Help by pressing the F1 key. Type in the phrase “Keyboard Shortcuts” and press the Magnifier. Let’s look at the item “Keyboard Shortcuts for Microsoft Word.” We’ve already looked at a couple of Keyboard Shortcuts. Do you remember what Control and Home does? In case you’ve forgotten, it takes you to the start of the document. Well this Help document contains a whole load of Keyboard Shortcuts related to the Selecting of Text, Copying it, and so on, and a few more besides.

Let’s look at Quick Reference for Microsoft Word.

Look at the Section

“Common Tasks in Microsoft Word.” Copy can be done using Control and C. Paste can be done using Control and V. And if you move down to the Section on Selection, you can see that we can Select by holding down the Shift key and moving the cursor with the Arrow keys. That’s pretty much the same method as using the mouse, but some people prefer the keyboard to the mouse, so that’s a good tip for them. Well, we’ve seen how to Copy and Paste. Now we’re going to move some Text about. Let’s use a document with a bit more Text in it. I’m going to Select the whole of the second paragraph using the mouse. Then I’m going to Cut using the Command on the Ribbon that’s like a pair of scissors. It’s gone. You know where it is though. It’s on the Clipboard. The difference is that it’s not in my document anymore. If I now position the cursor just before the word “You” near the start of the document and press the Paste button, the paragraph reappears in a different place. I’ve just done a Cut and Paste, which is the same as doing a Move. I can also Paste using the Keyboard Shortcut Control + V. If I do that I get my paragraph twice. What if I only meant to do it once? Easy. Don’t forget the Undo Command button. The Keyboard Shortcut for Undo is

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Control and Z, by the way. You might use that a lot if you make a lot of mistakes or change your mind a lot. Finally, in this, section I’m going to show you a very neat way of doing Cut and Paste. It’s often called Drag and Drop. You’ll need to be quite confident with the mouse to do this, but if you get the hang of it, it can save you a lot of time. It’ll also prove to be useful later when we start working with Pictures and so on. I’ve re-Opened my longer document in its original form. Select the second paragraph using the mouse, but this time leave it Selected and don’t press Cut. Instead click once inside the highlighted paragraph, but don’t release the mouse button. Instead, Drag the cursor to the start of the document, just to the left of the word “You.” Now release the left mouse button. We’ve Dragged and Dropped a paragraph. If you accidentally let the mouse button go or you don’t quite Drop the paragraph in the right place just use Undo and try again. It takes most people a little time to really get the hang of this, but it’s a quick way of working and some people find it easier than remembering Keyboard Shortcuts. Now we’re going to look at some more ways of Editing Text.

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Video: Insert/Overtype; Navigation Pane; Find & Replace Toby: We’re really starting to get into the detail of Creating our documents now. What if we make mistakes? Let’s see how to Delete Text. I’m going to position the cursor in the middle of some Text. If I press the Backspace key on the keyboard, it Deletes one character to the left of the cursor. Here’s a useful Keyboard Shortcut. If I hold down the Control key while I press the Backspace key, it Deletes a whole word to the left of the cursor. To Delete a character to the right of the cursor, use the Delete key. It might be labeled “Del” on your keyboard. Holding down the Control key while you do this Deletes a whole word to the right of the cursor. To Delete some Text you’ve already got Selected, press either the Backspace or the Delete key. There’s one other important point here. We normally use Word in Insert Mode. This means that as we type, new characters appear and push the existing ones to the right. Watch what happens as I do that here. There is another Mode called Overtype Mode where the characters we type overwrite the ones that are already there. To see the affect of this, I need to switch from Insert Mode to Overtype Mode. One easy way of doing this is to use a button that I can keep on the Status Bar. We’ve already seen how to Customize the Status Bar, so right click, go to the entry that says Overtype Insert, click there. You can see that the button at the bottom labeled “Insert” has appeared. If I click it once, it changes from Insert to Overtype. Now go back to my document and watch what happens as I type. Each character Overtypes what is all ready there. It doesn’t push the Text to the right. I can easily switch back to Insert Mode using that button. I don’t like working in Overtype Mode, but some people do. We’re now going to use a new feature that was introduced in Word 2010. It’s called the Navigation Pane. We won’t actually be able to use many of the features just yet, but it’s a good idea to introduce it now as we can take advantage of some of its features straight away. To see the Navigation Pane select the View Tab on the Ribbon, then click on Navigation Pane in the Show Group. The first Tab in the Navigation Pane shows the structure of our document. These are Headings. The current document is very simple. So there’s not much to see, but this Tab will be very useful to us in a little while. The second Tab shows Thumbnail Views of the pages in our document. We can use the Scroll Bar to the right if necessary to browse then access any part of a longer document. It’s easy to go to a particular page by clicking on its Thumbnail.

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We’ll look at the third Tab in a moment. Let’s Close the Navigation Pane by clicking on its Close button. One of the useful things we can do straight away with the Navigation Pane is to find specific objects in our document. Rather than use the button on the View Tab, I’m going to use the Keyboard Shortcut Control-F. If you’ve used Word before, you may remember that this shortcut normally starts the Find facility. Well, it still does, but now it brings up the Navigation Pane with the third Tab selected, which is the one we use to find things. If we want to Search for specific Text in our document, we enter it in the Text Box. I’m going to type in the word, “baseline.”

The Navigation Pane shows all occurrences of that word in my document, with a

Section of the Text around each shown. I can Select which occurrence I want to go to by clicking on it in the Navigation Pane. That’s a really easy way of finding a particular word or phrase. We Cancel that Search by pressing on the “X” next to the Search Box. We can also use this facility to Search for other things in a document. Click on the Magnifying Glass to see what else I can look for. We can Search for Tables, Graphics, and so on. We’ll be using this feature a lot later. Let’s return to Searching for Text, but this time let’s do a Replace. First of all, let’s go back to the beginning of the document. Do you remember Control and Home? Suppose we want to change every occurrence of the word “finish” with the word “end.” Select Replace. Enter Finish in the Find What Box. Enter End in the Replace With Box. Press Replace All. Word tells me that it’s found seven and replaced seven occurrences. That sounds good to me so I press OK. Finally Close the Find and Replace Box.

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Video: Hyphenation, Auto-Correct, and Redo Toby: Welcome back. In this module, we’re going to look at some useful features of Word that will help you to get better results when you’re entering or Editing Text. Some of them should help you to work more quickly as well. We’re going to start with Hyphenation. This may not seem too important a topic, but it’s quite straightforward and can give you better results with just a little effort. If a word won’t fit in a line, Word can try to break it with a Hyphen. This can not only reduce the overall length the document by wasting less space, but it can also give a better visual effect. However, some people don’t like Hyphenation or at least like to keep control over it; so Word gives us some options. Click on the Page Layout Tab and find Hyphenation in the Page Setup Group. First of all, let’s try Automatic Hyphenation. You may have noticed that the document changed. Look at the second paragraph. The word “anything” has been Hyphenated. So has the word “overtime.” There are other examples later in the document. Let’s change it back to None and try something else. If we select Manual, Word will let us choose which words to Hyphenate and where in each word to place the Hyphen. Let me work my way through the document. I can Cancel at any time. I don’t want to Hyphenate the word “project.” I don’t want to Hyphenate the word “baseline.” At the end I just click OK. This can be hard work for a Long Document, but we have total control. The Auto-Correct feature of Word can automatically correct common Capitalization and Spelling Errors as you type. Let’s see it in action. First of all let’s make sure it’s enabled. Use Backstage View to access Word Options. Select Proofing and Auto-Correct Options is near the top. There are many options and we can choose which ones we want to use. Let’s begin by looking at just two of them. Note that Capitalize first letter of sentences is checked and Capitalize names of days is checked. Let’s work on a New Document with these in mind. Here’s a new Keyboard Shortcut, Control and N opens a new Blank Document. I’m now going to type the sentence, “Today is Monday,” but I’m going to type very slowly and I want you to watch carefully as I type each letter. First of all, as soon as I finish typing the first word of the sentence Word capitalized it. The next word in the sentence was fine. Now, I start typing the “Monday” but don’t type the capital letter. When I get to the end, Word uses the fact that we’ve specified that it should Capitalize the names of days of the week and does the job for us. Now, I’m going to let Word correct my Spelling as I type as well. I’m going to type a second sentence,

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“Tomorrow is Tuesday,” but see what happens when I make a Spelling mistake. That’s pretty good isn’t it? We’ll introduce some other features of Auto-Correct later, but for now you know some of the things it does and how to switch these features on and off. Let’s move onto our last topic for now about Editing Text. This is the last of our basic topics on Editing Text. We’ve used Undo a couple of times already. It also has a partner, Redo. Let’s look at them both in a little more detail. If you make a mistake, Undo let’s you take back one or more recent actions. We’ve already used the Undo button on the Quick Access Tool Bar. If you look at that button closely, you’ll see an arrow on it. Click that and there is a list of actions you can Undo. If you want to Undo one of the actions on this list, Word will Undo that and all of the actions above it in the list. So for example, if I go back to “Typing is Monday,” it just leaves the word “Today” in my document. If you Undo an action but then decide that you want to do it after all, press Redo and Word will Redo the action for you. This is very useful if you get a little over-enthusiastic with Undo. Well, that’s it for now on Editing Text. We’ll learn a lot more as we cover other topics, but now we’re going to move onto Formatting the Text in our documents.

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Chapter 3 – Formatting Video: Text Formatting Toby: Welcome back. We’re getting to be pretty good at entering and Editing Text now. It’s time to make it look good. An eye-catching document will draw your readers in and even something as simple as a good choice of Font can make all the difference to the presentation of a document. Let’s start with some quick Formatting of one of our existing documents. Select the second paragraph then click the Home Tab. To change Fonts click the Font List arrow. If I scroll down the list and hover over a Font, we can see a Live Preview in the document. Let’s choose one of the Fonts. Now let’s change the Font Size. We can select the size from the Font Size Box, but there are also two helpful buttons: Grow Font and Shrink Font. Let’s try those in turn. In the end let’s go for 14-point. We then have a number of other simple Formatting Commands in the Font Group. See the effect of Bold, Italic, Underline, and Strikethrough. In the case of Underline there’s a drop down that lets us choose a Style and Color. We briefly saw a mini Tool Bar earlier above selected Text. If I hover over selected Text I can see that Tool Bar again. It has many of the Formatting Command buttons on it for easy access. That’s a neat little feature. Let’s look at one of the other buttons; we can change the Font Color. We’re now going to take a look at the Font Dialog which contains many of the Font Formatting features we commonly use. Let’s select a paragraph of Text again. Launch the Dialog from the button in the bottom right hand corner of the Font Group on the Home Tab. Most of the common options are on the first Tab. We can select a Font, a Style, and a Size, and some of the affects such as All Caps and Strikethrough. Let’s try a couple of those. I’ll look at the affects of my changes and then Undo them. On the Advanced Tab I see some other options. These include such features as Kerning and Ligatures which our outside our scope.

You might like to

experiment with them yourself though. We’re going to move on now, but before we do let’s just try something as a taster for later on. On the Font Tab, in the Font Dialog, select Text Effects, then Shadow. Choose a Preset and then click Close and OK. Now you can start to see just how much Word can do for you; more of that later.

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I’m now going to apply a Bold Style to several words in my document. But wait a moment; I’ve changed my mind about that. What I really should do is to use Italic for that emphasize. I need to change them all. I need a sort of Find and Replace for Formatting. Well, you guessed it, Word can do that. Do you remember how to get the Navigation Pane? Use the Ribbon or Control-F. If you use Control-F, it appears with the third Tab selected. That’s the one I need. Now I want to do a Replace, so choose that from the drop down. If you can see the More button in this Dialog, press it. Click Format and select the Font. Select Bold, click OK. If you look at Find What, you’ll see that the Box itself is empty. We’re not looking for specific words, but underneath it says Font Bold. We’re going to Find occurrences of a Bold Font. Now let’s go through the same process with the Replace part. This time we’re going to specify that the new effect will be Italic. Watch me as I do that. Check that the Replace With box is empty but the Font Italic is written underneath it. We’re looking good. We might be tempted to just click Replace All here and that would be fine, but sometimes you want to try something out at first to see that we’ve set it up correctly. Click on Find Next. Well, we’ve certainly found an instance of Bold. Click Replace. It’s replaced our Bold with Italic and it’s found the next Bold. That looks good, so let’s do a Replace All and check that Word finds that the right number of remaining occurrences. We’re going to look at one other feature of Text Formatting in this Section, then we’ll move onto Formatting whole paragraphs. It’s possible to Hide some of the Text in a document. There can be several reasons for doing this. You may be working on a couple of paragraphs, but want to conceal those while you Print the ones you’re happy with. Although you may want to Print a copy of a document for somebody else with a couple of sentences left out. Whatever the reason, it’s easy to do. Select the Text, bring up the Font Dialog, select Hidden, click OK. Easy. Sometimes you may have forgotten whether you have left any Hidden Text in a document. Don’t forget the Document Inspector. Do you remember how to get that? Backstage View, Check for issues, Inspect document, uncheck everything except Hidden Text, Inspect. We have been warned. Let’s move onto Formatting whole paragraphs.

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Video: Paragraph Formatting Toby: Hello again. We’re going to take a look at Formatting of whole paragraphs next. If you look at the Home Tab on the Ribbon you can see a Paragraph Group. That contains many of the most useful Formatting Commands. Let’s take one or two of them for a drive. But, first note that although these Commands apply to paragraphs, you don’t necessarily need to select a whole paragraph to apply them.

You usually only need the cursor to be somewhere inside the

paragraph you want to Format. Okay, let’s start. We’re going to put the cursor in the second paragraph. It’s currently Left Justified which means that the Text is Aligned at the Left Margin but ragged at the right. It’s sometimes referred to as Ragged Right. I can use the Align Text Right button to change it to Right Aligned or Ragged Left. Look at the affect. I can also Align it at both edges using the Justify button. This is often called Fully Justified. And finally I can Center it, but have it ragged at both edges using the Center button. Let’s go back to Left Justified. Another useful feature is the ability to change the Line and Paragraph Spacing. There is a button with a drop down for this. The 1.0 that’s selected tells us that the paragraph is single spaced. Let’s change it to double spaced and see the affect. Let’s change it back. If we look at the drop down again we can see a line that says Line Spacing Options. Select that and we can see a Dialog that enables us to make a wide range of changes. We’ll return to this later. Word has a couple of Rulers that we’re going to find very useful. There’s a Horizontal Ruler and a Vertical Ruler. Let’s display the Rulers. Click the View Tab and then select Ruler in the Show/Hide Group. The Horizontal Ruler up here shows the length of the typing line and lets you adjust Margins, Indents, Tabs, and so on. We’ll be looking at those in detail later. The Vertical Ruler on the left lets you see the top and bottom Margins and is very useful later when we’re dealing with Tables. If you prefer a different system of measurement, you can change it using Backstage View. Let’s do that now. Select Options, then Advanced, then scroll down to Display, and change to a different system of units. This is currently set at Centimeters; I’ll change it to Inches. Now both Rulers are graduated in Inches. We can change it back if we want to, although note that you can’t change Option Settings back using Undo. Undo is for changes to a document, not changes to the Setup of our Workspace. Backstage View, Options, Advanced, scroll down to Display, change to Centimeters, OK. Let’s select the Page Layout Tab, then Size. This document is A4, which means it’s 21 centimeters wide. Look at the Margins. They’re set

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at 2.54 centimeters all around. That’s about an inch. Look at the Rulers. The Horizontal Ruler shows a total width of 21 centimeters with the Margins set at about 2.5 centimeters on each side. Now let’s see what we can actually do with the Horizontal Ruler. In a Word paragraph you can have a number of Indents. Let’s look at the possible Indents and what they do. If you look at our sample document and the Horizontal Ruler, you can see four little buttons. They represent First Line Indent, Hanging Indent, Left Indent, and Right Indent. Together with the Alignment we’ve chosen, Left or Right or Justified, they determine the shape of our paragraphs. So that you can understand what each of them does I’m going to slide each of them in turn and we’ll look at the affect. We’ll start with Left Indent. The first thing to note is that the change only applies to the paragraph containing the cursor. To make this more useful let’s Undo that last change and select two paragraphs. One thing you may have noticed is that when I move the Left Indent, the other two above it moved as well. There’s a reason for this that we’re going to look at now. We’re now going to move only the First Line Indent further to the right. We can see that only the first line has that Indent, none of the other lines are affected. Now let’s move the First Line Indent back to the original position on the left. The other lines now appear to be Indented. That is what is referred as to a Hanging Indent. We can move the Hanging Indent itself using the second slider. Finally, let’s move the Right Indent. I think you should be able to guess what happens when we move that to the left. I hope you were right. If you’ve ever seen or even use an old typewriter, you may know about Tab Keys. They moved the typing head to a particular place on the typing line so that the typist could Align things vertically. Well, Word has Tabs as well and they’re for pretty much the same reason. Let’s look at what they do and how to use them. Let’s select just one paragraph at a time. Look at the left hand end of the Horizontal Ruler. There’s a little control called the Tab button. If we press it repeatedly it displays different types of Tab, including Left Tabs, Center Tabs, and Right Tabs. Let’s click through and select the Left Tab. Now let’s click once on the Ruler at a point where we want a Left Tab Stop. We can see the Tab Marker on the Ruler. It specifies a pre-determined point on the typing line. Now click to the start of our first paragraph. Press the Tab Key on the keyboard and we go straight to our Tab Stop. Now click to the left of the second paragraph. It doesn’t have that Tab Stop on the Ruler. Why not? Because we only selected the first paragraph before we set the Tab Stop. If paragraphs are selected before Tab Stops are set, they are only

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applied to the selected paragraphs. If a paragraph doesn’t have Tab Stops, they are set at Default positions along the Ruler. If I press Tab repeatedly with the cursor at the start of the second paragraph, you can see where those positions are. In fact, if you look, there are little marks below the Ruler showing the Default positions. Let’s take a closer look at our Tab Stops on the first paragraph. Double click on the Tab Marker and we see the Tabs Dialog. This enables us to position our Tabs accurately, change Alignment, and set-up Tab Leaders. We’ll come back to those later.

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Video: Formatting with Bullets, Indents, Borders, Shading Toby:

We’re now going to look at a particularly useful and striking way of presenting

information. In this document, we can see a regular shopping list. We can make it more impressive and give it some structure using the Bulleted and Numbered List features of Word. Let’s start with Bulleting. Select the whole list. We select the Home Tab on the Ribbon and find the Bullets button in the Paragraph Group. Click it once. We have a Bulleted List. Now try the drop down to the right of that button. This lets us choose our buttons. Let’s try a different style. That’s pretty easy, as you can see. To the right of the Bullets button is the Numbering button. Let’s try that. Again, there’s a drop down with some options. Let’s try Letters instead of Numbers. Then let’s go back to Numbers. Now let’s select just three items in the Numbered List: Potatoes, Peas, and Carrots. There is another button in the Paragraph Group that’s called Increase Indent. Click that and see what happens. There are two things. Firstly, the three items are shifted to the right. Their Indent is increased. Secondly, they are now considered to be a different level in our list and so are not Numbered in sequence like the others. We now have a Multi-Level List. Let’s try one more thing. Click anywhere in the list, find the button labeled Multi-Level List and select the drop down on its right hand side. We select a style of MultiLevel List and there we are. That’s quite some shopping list now. There are some other really useful ways of Formatting a paragraph. Applying a Border can create a very striking effect. Let’s put the cursor in the second paragraph and now let’s find the button in the Paragraph Group on the Home Tab that’s labeled No Border. Click the drop down on its right. There are many Border options. Let’s try All Borders. It now has a top Border, a left Border, a right Border, and so on. Now let’s remove the left Border and the right Border. As you can see, you can pretty much arrange Borders in any way you want to. Another really useful Formatting tool is the use of Shading. Let’s carry on working on the same document. I’ve put the cursor in the second paragraph. Find the Shading button and click on the drop down on its right. We can see a whole palette of colors that we can try to Shade this paragraph. Let’s try a few now. Easy. Now let’s really step things up. If we find the Borders button again and select the drop down, we can open the Borders and Shading Dialog Box. This Dialog lets us do the things we’ve just done and a few more besides. So it’s well worth knowing

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about. It has three Tabs. The Borders Tab lets us specify where to put Borders, but it also lets us choose from some additional options such as Shadow and 3-D affects. And it lets us specify how thick the Border lines are. Let’s try a few of those now. What about a Shadow effect? This stands out better with a light-colored Shading. The Shading Tab lets us choose from a full palette of colors, but it also lets us choose from a range of patterns for the Fill. Let’s try a 25% Fill with this light Color. And finally for this Dialog, there is a third Tab that lets us choose a Page Border. The options here are similar to those for putting a Border around a paragraph, so let’s try those again. When we’ve made our selections we can click OK to see the effect on the whole page. Use the Zoom Slider to get a better view of the overall effect. And finally we can even add some Art for a little bit of fun. That’s it on Formatting for now. We’ll be doing a lot more later when we learn about Styles, Graphics, and so on.

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Chapter 4 – Templates Video: Creating/Saving New Template; Changing Styles Toby: Word documents are based on Templates. These are Pre-Designed and Pre-Formatted Files that we use as starting points for our documents. Each Template has stars that have common elements such as Fonts, Colors, and Layouts. A Template is a set of unified Design elements. Not everyone is good at Design. If you are not, Templates give you access to professional Design skills that have all ready been applied in creating the Templates. You can easily create your own Templates. Suppose you have a regular report that you need to complete each month of your hours worked. Let’s type a very simple report for June 2010. I’m not actually going to type the month here, I’m going to use a special feature on the Insert Menu. Insert Date and Time and I’m going to choose the month and year in that Format. Now I’m just going to type in Hours Worked, 135, same. Now from Backstage View I do a Save As and I’m not going to Save this as a document, I’m going to Save it as a Word Template. And I’m going to Save it in the Templates Folder. You can already see there one or two of the Templates that we used earlier. I do a Save and then I can Close. I’ve created my first Template. Let’s now Create a New Document. New. This time my Templates and one of the available Templates is month.docx. Now that’s a very simple document, but it does illustrate the main features of using Templates. There’s one other very important point before we move on. Although I typed the number of hours, I entered the date as a Word Field. If I create a monthly report during the month of July, the month will be updated automatically. That’s a very simple example of something we’ll spend some time on later. You can see how some of the features of Word can really save you time. Every document we create in Word is created from a Template. If we don’t select a Template when we start the creation, our document is created using what’s called the Normal Template. We can actually Open Templates and work on them is we want to make changes to them. From Backstage View select Open, then a type of All Word Templates. You can see a set of .docx files that I have available. One of them is Normal.dotm. We’ll talk about .dotm later. This is the Normal Template. There’s also a version of that open. Whenever I’m working in Word on documents, the Normal Template is Open and I can make changes to it. However, it’s important

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to make those changes in the right way. So don’t be tempted to Open Normal.dotm and start editing it. You might cause some damage. Note the Folder that contains my Templates. I’m working on a Network and my Templates are just visible to me. I don’t share them with anybody else. If you work on a Network, you might be in the same situation or you might share your Templates. If you work on a shared PC at home you might want to share your Templates with the rest of the family. Whatever your situation, it’s worth knowing where your Templates are stored. You may guess that we need Backstage View, click on Options, click on Advanced, scroll down to General. File Locations and this one tells you where your Templates are stored. If you want to store them somewhere else there is a Modify option. Let’s go back to opening a Template. Let’s open the Fax Template we used earlier. I don’t really like the Font on most of this, so I’m going to change it to Arial. Select the paragraphs I want to change. Change from Perpetual to Arial. I’ll stick with the 11-point, that’s okay. Now I’m going to Save my changes, but as a new Template. I’ll call it Arial Fax. Finally, Close the Template. Now if I want to create a new Fax document from my Arial Template, it’s in the My Templates Folder and I’m all set up. File, New, My Templates, and there it is. That’s great. Now we’re going to take a first look at Styles. The use of Styles has been significantly improved in recent versions of Word. So if you have been using Word 2003 or earlier, this may all be very new or different to you. We’re looking at one of our familiar documents. On the Home Tab find the Styles Group and select the drop down for Change Styles. Click on Styles Set and hover over each entry in the list. The effect of the Style on our document is Previewed. These Styles are referred to as Quick Styles. A Style Set is a combination of different Style elements, such as Font, Size, Paragraph, Formatting, and so on. Note that the Default Style Set here is black and white. Let’s choose the Elegant Style. You may have noticed that the contents to the left of the drop down, this large box change as we hovered over each possible selection. This large box contains specific Styles within the chosen Style Set for specific paragraph types in our document. We’ll come back to those later. For now let’s look at our New Document and the effect that applying the Elegant Style has had. Having applied the Elegant Style to our document, let’s now change it. Let’s change the Justification to Right Justified. Here’s another useful Keyboard Shortcut, Control-A selects the whole document. Align Text Right. It looks a bit strange but never mind. We can now Save

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that as a new Style Set. Click on the Change Styles drop down, select Save As Quick Style Set. Let’s give it the name of Elegant Right. We now have a new Style Set name on our drop down Menu. That’s a great way of saving a Style you like and making it easy to use again. In the next section, we’re going to look at how to manage our Styles in more detail. See you then.

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Video: Managing, Modifying and Deleting New Styles Toby: Once we start to create a few Styles that we like, we need to manage them so that we can keep track. Word provides good facilities for looking after all the hard work we’ve put in. Although we can create a Style by changing an existing one, we can also create one from scratch. On the Home Tab click the Launcher at the bottom right of the Styles Group and we see the Styles Pane. One of the Command buttons at the bottom of the Pane is labeled New Style. We now get the Create New Style from Formatting Dialog. Let’s give it a name. How about Blue Square? Now we can have different Style Types. This Style is going to be a Paragraph Style, as we know about paragraphs. Later on we can look at others such as Table Styles and List Styles. The Style will be based on our Normal Style. The meaning of this will be clearer later, but for the moment think of it as a Style we’ll use for Normal Text rather than Headings, for example. Style for the following paragraph is useful. It says that if we enter a paragraph with Style Blue Square, then the next paragraph will Default to a Style Blue Square as well. We can always change it manually of course. Now we can choose some Formatting for the Text. I’m going to leave the Font and Size the same but I’m going to change the Color to blue. That’s the blue part of Blue Square. Now move onto Paragraph Formatting. I’m going to choose Fully Justified. That’s the square part of Blue Square. And single line spaced. Look at some of the options at the bottom. I can say that I want this Style in my Quick Style List. I don’t, although I could. I can say whether I want the Style only available in this document or available to any New Document based on this Template. For now I’m going to restrict it to this document only. I’m also checking the option to Automatically Update. We’ll see what that does in a moment. You should also look at the drop down from the Format Box. A Style can specify many other things such as Tabs, Borders, and so on. We have specified enough of this Style though, so let’s click OK and see what happens. We’re looking at one of our regular documents. The cursor was in the first paragraph so the New Style has been applied to that paragraph. Click in the second paragraph, go to our Styles Pane, select Blue Square, and our New Style is applied to that paragraph as well. Now what about that Automatically Update checkbox? Well if I now Modify Blue Square and change it to a different shade of blue, it automatically updates in every location where that Style is in use. That’s pretty good as well; a real time saver.

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Let’s return to how we manage our Styles. We’ve seen how to Create them either from scratch or by Copying from another. What about Modifying and Deleting Styles? Let’s Open the Styles Pane again. Do you remember how to Move and Resize a Pane like this using the mouse? Good. Well, if you have trouble with that, Panes like this also have a little drop down that can help you. Click on Move and see what happens. Now click on Size. What Word does is to put the cursor exactly where you need it to Move or Size the Pane. That’s neat. Anyway, the Styles Pane has a very useful button at the bottom on the right. It’s the Manage Styles button. Many of the functions on the Manage Styles Dialog are beyond what we need at the moment. We’ll return to some of them later. But the Edit Tab is useful, particularly the Modify button. This gives us a convenient way to Modify any Styles that we’ve copied or created. It’s also easy to manage specific Styles using the Styles Pane. This gives us four main options. Update Blue Square to Match Selection. Suppose we have a Style in a document that we like and we want to Save it with a name we’ve all ready using. So, for example, we’ve got a New Style, but we’d like to call it Blue Square which we’re always using. Press this and the New Style replaces the one that was there before. Modify gives us access to the straight forward Modify Style Dialog. Delete Blue Square; well, we can work out what this does. We need to confirm, of course. And finally Remove from Quick Style Gallery. Well, Blue Square is in that Gallery there, there it is. Remove from Quick Style Gallery and it’s gone. Let’s take a quick look at one more useful tool now. It’s called the Style Inspector. Suppose we have a section of Text and we just want to know what all of its Formatting is, let’s select a Blue Square paragraph and start the Styles Pane. The middle button at the bottom is the Style Inspector. Click once. You now see the Style Inspector Dialog. Click on the left button at the bottom which is labeled Reveal Formatting. The details of the Formatting of the selection are revealed on the Pane in the right. We can see Font. We can see the Paragraph Style. We can see the Font Color which is Text 2. Just one more useful thing; suppose that we want to know how it is different from another paragraph in Style. Well check the Compare Box, then click in the other paragraph. This is one that is not Blue Square and Reveal Formatting shows that there are two differences. Our first selection, Blue Square is Justified. The other one is Left. Font is different. It’s Text 2 in our first selection and it’s Auto which in this case is black in our second selection. That’s really great isn’t it?

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Video: Working with/Using Themes Toby: Welcome back. Now we’re going to look at Themes. A Theme is a set of Colors, Fonts, and Effects that have been chosen to help us to create professional looking documents using a balanced palette. Word 2010 provides Default and Standard Themes or we can Create our own. The most significant feature of Themes compared to Styles is that Themes are meant to apply throughout the whole of a document affecting not only its Text but its Tables, Charts, and so on. It’s also very important to know that Themes in Word 2010 are common across all of Office 2010.

So if we’re preparing a Word document, an Excel Spreadsheet, and a PowerPoint

presentation, we can apply the same Theme to all three. To illustrate Themes a little better we’re going to need some documents with more content. Let’s create a new document from one of Words Sample Templates. Do you remember how? File, brings up Backstage View, New, Sample Templates, and we’re going to use the Equity Letter. Now go to the Page Layout Tab and select Themes. You can see Word 2010s built in Themes, Office, Adjacency, and so on. If we hover over each one, we can see the effect of the Theme on the document. There’s Angles, there’s Apex, and so on. It’s not just the Font that’s affected; it’s the Color as well. Now let’s Close this document without Saving it and let’s try an Executive Newsletter. Page Layout, Themes, watch the effect of this. Office, Adjacency, Angles, and so on. We can see the Font changing, the Color of the Text changing, the Shading changing, the actual Size and Layout of the page as well. So, it’s quite a significant effect on a document like this. A simple change of Theme can completely change the look and feel of a document. Let’s create a new document using the Equity Letter Template. Click on the Home Tab and the Font Color drop down and you can see that the available Colors are divided into Theme Colors and Standard Colors. And we’re going to look at what the difference is between those in the context of Themes. First of all, let’s select two or three lines of our letter and apply a Theme Color; any one of this Group. Let’s apply that one. Now let’s choose a different two lines and apply a Standard Color, a bright red so that we can really see it. Now we go back to the Page Layout Tab, select Themes, and start hovering over each of the built-in Themes. Watch those two pairs of lines. As I go to the Office Theme, the top pair change Color to fit in with the Theme. The lower pair are still bright red. Now watch as I go through the others; Adjacency, Angles, Apex, Black Tie, Austen. The Fonts change, the Paragraph Formatting changes, but not

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the Color on those lower two lines. Those lower two lines are not Theme aware. The upper two lines are Theme aware. This really illustrates the basic idea of Themes very well. We’re now going to Modify and Save a Theme to create a Custom Theme. Let’s start by creating a new Adjacency Letter. Select the line that the salutation appears on, go to the Page Layout Tab, and click on the Theme Colors button. Click the Create New Theme Colors. You can now see the 12 colors that are used in this Theme and the context in which each is used. We are going to give our new Color Scheme a name. We’re going to call it Yellow Custom and we’re going to change the top color to a nice bright yellow. And we’re going to Save that. We’ve now created a new Theme. If we go to the Themes drop down again and say Save Current Theme, we can Save the whole Theme with a name. We’re going to call that Yellow Custom as well. Note that a Theme File name has an extension of .thmx. So now you know what .thmx means. Save. Now go back to the letter. If we hover through the available Themes as usual, we can see the affect as we go through Apex, Black Tie, Austen, and so on. But above the built-in Themes we now have my Custom Theme, Yellow Custom. And when I scroll, hover over that, you can see the affect of that Theme. To finish off our first look at Themes, we’re going to look at Fonts and Effects. Both of these can be Customized as well. We’re not going to go through this in detail here, but let’s take a quick look. We create an Adjacency Letter again. Now look at Themes on the Page Layout Tab. Next to the Themes button and below Theme Colors is a Theme Fonts button. We can follow a similar procedure to the one for Colors to Create a new Theme from an existing one with different Fonts. Below the Theme Fonts button is a Theme Effects button. That’s right, it works in much the same way. And finally, how do we Delete a Theme we no longer need? Find it in the Theme Gallery, right click, and Delete.

It’s as simple as that. That’s it for now on

Templates, Styles, and Themes, although we’ll be learning more about them later.

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Chapter 5 – Graphics Video: Inserting/Formatting ClipArt, Pictures Toby: Welcome back. Now it’s time to really start to bring our documents to life with some Graphics. There’s a stunning array of Graphics available nowadays. Not only does Word 2010 offer loads of ClipArt, but we can use our own and other people’s images, such as photographs. Let’s start with the basics of getting a Graphic into our document. We select the Insert Tab on the Ribbon then locate the Illustrations Group. Let’s try some ClipArt. In the ClipArt Pane on the right, note the check box that’s marked Include Office.com Content. Checking this gives us access to Microsoft’s Online Library of ClipArt. Let’s leave it unchecked for now. The Search Box lets us look for ClipArt related to a specific subject. Let’s look for something about a dog. Click on go. There’s one item. I double click it and its there. We’ll come back to the Box around it in a moment. Let’s try another one. Note the second box that’s marked All Media File Types. Click the drop down and we can see what the options are: Illustrations, Photographs, Videos, Audio. Let’s uncheck everything except Photographs and let’s clear the Search Box. If we do a Search with the Box empty, we’ll look for every type of the selected Media File Types, in this case, a photograph. We see we have four photographs available. Let’s choose one, double click, and it’s in our document. So there you go, it’s as easy as that. Now let’s Close the File we’ve been working on. Don’t want to Save any changes and let’s Open one of the Files we’ve been working on before, the one about Sydney. Make sure the cursor is to the left of the first paragraph, click on Insert, ClipArt. We’re going to look for ClipArt about Sydney but this time we’ll try All Media Types and we will include Office.com content. So this means we’re going to Search the Microsoft Site Library as well. And what we come up with is quite a selection of Graphics related to Sydney. Let’s choose one of these; how about that one, double click. It takes a moment to go into the document because it’s got to be downloaded from the Microsoft Site. It’s a great picture but it’s a bit big. It’s time to find out about Formatting Pictures. One of the first things we need to do is to learn how to Resize a Picture. There are a few ways of doing this. One easy way is to use the resizing controls on the picture itself. For example, if I hover over the right hand bottom corner of the picture I see a two-headed arrow appear. Click

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and hold with the mouse and drag the picture to a smaller size. Let’s Close the ClipArt pane so that we can see what we’re doing a little better. We can always Open it again if we need it. Now let’s look at some of our other options for Formatting this Picture. If we right click on the picture, we see a Menu with a small Tool Bar above it. Look at the Tool Bar. It actually shows the current Size of our picture. If we wanted it to be a specific size, we could set the size using the Toolbar. That’s much more accurate than just dragging the Sizing handles. If we make it 4 centimeters high, note how the width changes automatically to maintain the proportions. Our picture is a much better size now, but our document would look even better if we made the Text flow around it. Let’s see how to do that. Right click on the picture again and select Wrap Text. Let’s see what some of the available options do. We can see the effects by hovering over each Menu option. In line with Text basically treats our picture like a big character in the Text. It sort of makes it the first character in the first sentence. It looks just the way it does now. Sometimes we may want that effect, but not this time. Let’s try Square. Now that’s more like it. Tight does the same but the Text is a little closer to the Picture. Top and Bottom positions the Text above and below the Picture. Although in this case there’s no Text before and above our Picture. Behind Text puts the Text behind. That doesn’t really work for this sort of Photograph. And finally you can get finer control by selecting More Layout Options and using this Dialog. Let’s go with Square. Let’s Insert another Picture but this time let’s use the Insert Picture option; this option let’s me Insert Photos from Files. This is how we can Insert our own Photos that we’ve loaded from a digital camera, for example. I’m going to put the cursor at the start of the third paragraph. Go to Insert, Illustrations Group, Insert Picture, Browse to my Photo in the Pictures Folder. There it is. Select the Photo, click on Insert. I’m now going to Resize it using the Menu. I can actually type the Size that I want and then I can Wrap the Text. There we are. That’s quick and easy. Once we have a Picture in a document, we will normally want to position it quite accurately. An easy way to position a Picture is to grab it with the left mouse button and move it around. Let’s move our first Picture over to the right of the page. It’s really as easy as that. We could even place it in the middle of the page. In fact we can put it just about anywhere we want to. But if we want a bit more accuracy, there is a good option. Right click on the Picture and choose More Layout Options. That brings up a Dialog that lets us do all three of the following: Position the

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Picture, note the Horizontal and Vertical Alignment Sections; Specify Text Wrapping, including the distance of the Picture from the Text; and Size, including locking the Aspect Ratio which maintains the proportion of the Picture. We’ve covered all the basics of Inserting and Formatting Pictures now. In the next section, we’ll take a look at how we do some more clever things with Graphics, including some of the new and improved features in Word 2010.

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Video: Using Picture Tools & New Features Toby: Welcome back. We’re back at our document about Sydney and it has just one Picture near the beginning of the document. If I click on the picture, we see a new Tab appear on the Ribbon. It’s a Context Sensitive Tab. Context Sensitive Tabs appear when certain things happen. When a Picture is selected the Picture Tools Tab appears. Click on the Tab and we see a whole array of tools that are all designed to work on Pictures. The Picture Tools Tab was introduced in Word 2007 and its features have been improved in Word 2010. To the right of the Tab are some of the Tools we’ve used already, such as Position, Wrap Text and Size. Most of the others are new to us, so let’s take a look at a few of them. Let’s start with Picture Styles. As with most of the Picture Tools in Word, we only have to hover over a Command button to Preview its effect; hovering over some of these shows features such as Frames, Shadows, and Reflections. There’s a truly amazing array of effects that are built into these Standard Styles in Word 2010. Let’s try them on our Picture of Sydney. Simple Frame, white; Beveled Matte, white; Drop Shadow, rectangle; Beveled Oval, black; Double Frame, black and so on. These are specific combinations of the various effects that are available. We can also separate the effects and create our own. Let’s now try the Picture Effects drop down. This has Effects characterized into Shadow, Reflection, Bevel and so on. Let’s Preview a few of those: Shadow, Reflection, Glow, 3-D Rotation and so on. Now let’s move onto the Picture Layout drop down. This can be used to arrange single pictures or groups of pictures. Even with our single photo we can get a cool effect. Select Bending Picture Caption and enter some Text. There are plenty of options to experiment with here. In the next sequence, we’re going to look at some more Effects that we can achieve using the Picture Tools in Word. Let’s start with our Sydney document again. Let’s Insert ClipArt again, but keep it a bit larger. We’ll Insert an aerial photo of Sydney. Let’s look at some of the adjustments we can make using Tools in the Adjust Group on the Picture Tools Tab. Firstly, using the Corrections option, we can Sharpen or Soften the picture. Note how the Tool Tip tells us the Brightness and Contrast. We can achieve finer control using Picture Corrections Options, which is on the Format Picture Dialog. Now let’s look at some of the Color options. We can adjust Saturation, Tone and so on. Again, we can get finer control with the Picture Color Options on the Format Picture Dialog. The Artistic Effects Options can produce some striking effects. How about Pencil Sketch or

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Line Drawing or even Mosaic Bubbles? One other Tool that we can also use to produce interesting and Graphic Effects is Remove Background. This Tool uses software intelligence to suggest areas of a picture to keep or discard, but lets us manually override this. We can effectively cut out a part of a Picture to achieve the effect we want. For instance, here Keep Changes leaves us that part of our aerial picture of Sydney. Let’s Undo, again going to Remove Background. We can actually mark areas to Remove and we can actually Draw those areas manually with a pen. On the Picture Tool Tab, there is another Group called Size. We’ve already used this Sizing Tool, but there’s one we haven’t used yet and it’s important. So let’s take a look at it now. The Crop Tool enables us to Remove part of a picture. In its simplest use we click on Crop and a set of Cropping marks appears. We move these with the mouse to a position we want. The area of the Picture that will be Removed is Shaded. When the marks are in our desired position we click Crop again and the Picture is Cropped. Let’s just Undo that. There are some more advanced options. For example, Crop to Shape lets us cut out an irregular Shape from our Picture. One last Picture Tool to look at in the Arrange Group is in the bottom right hand corner and it’s Rotate. Apart from Rotates and Flips there is an option, More Rotation Options that gives us access to the Layout Dialog that includes the Tabs for Position and Text Wrapping as well. We’ve now covered all the basics of Inserting and Formatting Pictures, but there’s plenty more to cover on Graphics so let’s move onto the next module.

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Video: Inserting Screenshots, Using WordArt Toby: Hello again; glad you’re back. We’re going to take it a little easier for a while now and look at one of the other great Graphic features of Word 2010. This one is really easy to use. Anybody who has ever had to write a report or describe some software will know just how often it will be really neat to be able to put what’s on your computer screen into a document for other people to see. Well, with Word it’s now super easy. Let me show you how to do it. I’m running the Windows Calculator and you can see it on the screen now. Word is behind it. I have a new empty document open in Word. I switch to Word, click on Insert, and click on Screenshot. I select the Windows Calculator and hey presto, it’s in my document. But Word 2010 let’s me go one better than that. Suppose that I only want part of a screen that’s on show. Back to Insert, click on Screen Clipping and it lets me go to whatever part of the screen I want. Select that and just that part is in my Word. I think that’s really great. We’re now going to look at a feature of Word that’s been around for a while. It’s called WordArt. It has been improved over time and it’s a popular tool. WordArt allows us to create Stylized Text. We can choose from a variety of textiles or create our own. Let’s start a new document, File, New, Blank Document as usual, Insert Tab, and over here in the Text Group we have WordArt. Select a Style; I’ll go for this one. A Text Box is created in our document. Let’s type “Hello World.” Let’s also drag the Box to somewhere in the document that it’s a bit easier to see. Once we have a Box, a Context Specific set of Drawing Tools appears. Many of these Tools can be applied to the Text Box we’ve just created, but first let’s concentrate on the Tools in the WordArt Styles Group. The Text Fill Tool allows us to choose a Text Color. The Text Outline Tools allow us to choose a Text Outline. We use the Text Effects Group to try various Effects. Let’s try a few of those; Shadow. Let’s try a Shadow Effect like that one or an inner Shadow like this one or Perspective like that or that. Let’s try Reflection. Here we have Reflection, Hello World, and again different types of Reflection. Glow Effects like that, that, that. 3-D with some Rotation. And finally Transform like this or this. We can see how many possibilities there are. One word of warning though, it’s easy to over-do WordArt. A little of it goes a long way.

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Most of the Tools on the Drawing Tools Tab can be used on WordArt. So let’s take a look at a few of them. In fact, as we’ll need these Tools later when we start to make more complex pages, it’s a good idea to start using them now so that we become confident with them. Let’s make our WordArt bigger Text in a bigger box. Shape Styles enable us to change the Shape of the whole Box and the Effect in there. Shape Fill lets us Fill the box with different Colors. We could fill it with a picture. For instance, our picture of Sydney. Shape Fill can also be used to Fill with a Gradient or a Texture. We can also see the effects of some of the others. Shape Outline, Weight, Outline Thick, Thicker, Thickest, and Shape Effects such as Shadows, Reflections, Glow, Bevels, and various Rotations. Let’s go for that one. Let’s round off our look at WordArt with a look at the effect of Text Direction in the Text Group. Undo that. In the Text Group, Text Direction; I can Rotate, All Text 90-degrees. Rotate it the other way. There are plenty of other options on this Tab, so experiment with each of them yourself to find the ones that you like best.

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Video: Using SmartArt, SmartArt Tools Toby: Welcome back. SmartArt Graphics were introduced into Word in the 2007 version. This feature lets us create Diagrams that convey processes or relationships. To explain what they are and how they work let’s get straight into an example. Select the Insert Tab then SmartArt. We’re asked to choose a SmartArt Graphic. The left Pane lets us choose a Category. Let’s choose a List. We then choose a SmartArt Graphic Style. Let’s choose Vertical Picture Accent List. Click OK. We can now start adding Text to our SmartArt Graphic. We’re going to describe our company’s philosophy in relation to its customers and our three main themes are Safety, Quality, and Service. Now I could’ve entered that Text in a special Text Pane. Click on this little symbol on the left to Launch it. There we can see an alternative location to enter or Edit Text. But wait a moment, I’ve just realized I’ve forgotten one of the basic elements of my philosophy, Value. Have I got to start again? No. Position the cursor to the right of the word “Service” in the Text Pane and press the Enter key. That’s why it’s called SmartArt. Let’s now add Value as the other principle. This time we’ve used the Text Pane. In the next section, we’re going to improve the look of our SmartArt Graphic. Let’s look at some of the options for Formatting our SmartArt Graphic. Firstly, let’s hide the Task Pane. There’s a button on the Tool Bar to do that. Then let’s look at the SmartArt Styles Group. We have a drop down on Change Colors that we can try. As usual we only have to hover over to see the Effect. We also have a selection of Quick Styles. We can hover over those to try those. Let’s go for this one. In the Layouts Group we have a number of options. Let’s now look at the Create Graphic Group. This enables us to manually add another Shape or to change the order of our Text. We can also Promote and Demote items. Let’s try one or two of these with our example. Re-order up moves Value to third in the List, up to second, we can move it down again. Clearly what some of these do depends on the specific Chart and Type in use. But the general principles apply throughout. And finally if we make a load of changes, but just want to go back to our original, there’s a button on the SmartArt Tools Tab that does a reset. It’s called Reset Graphic. So that we can see a bit more of SmartArt in practice, let’s create an Organization Chart as an example. Go to the Insert Tab, Insert SmartArt, choose Hierarchy, and then Organization Chart.

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As we add names to the Chart note that the box we’re working on is always highlighted in the main graphic. So, when we start, it’s the name at the top that we type in first. We can select which person we want to enter then name of next in the main graphic. Let’s say that Jack is at Level 2. If we want somebody at the same level as Jack, we can use the Add Shape button on the Ribbon and click Add Shape After. This adds a person at the same level but to the right of Jack. Choosing Add Shape Below would add another node to our Chart at the next level down and so on. Let’s fill in the rest of the names. When we’ve filled in all of the names, we can do some Formatting. Click inside the Graphic and use the controls on the Design Tab under SmartArt Tools. Let’s choose a SmartArt Style. Then change the Color a little. We could consider changing the Layout and there are even Layouts where we could include photos of the people. But let’s not do that just now. Finally, click outside the Organization Chart and we have our finished Smart Graphic. That’s it on SmartArt for now, but we’ll be doing more Graphics later.

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Chapter 6 – Tables Video: Inserting Tables; Adding Text; Selecting Parts of Tables Toby: Hello again. In this section, we’re going to talk about Tables. A Table is an Object that is Inserted into a Word document that displays Text in Rows and Columns. You can set up a Table by converting from existing Text or you can create an empty Table and enter your own Text. We’re going to first of all look at a number of ways of Inserting an empty Table. On the Insert Menu find Table in the Tables Group, click on the drop down and we have a number of ways of Inserting a Table. Let’s start with the Insert Table Dialog. This lets us specify the number of Columns, I’m going to choose four. The number of Rows, I’m going to choose six. I’ll talk about Auto-fit behavior later and I click on OK. I now have a Table with four Columns, that’s the vertical arrangements, six Rows. The intersection of a Row and a Column is called a Cell. I’m going to Undo that Table and I’m now going to do the same thing but in a different way. Insert, Table, now I’m going to Insert a Table of the same size but using this Visual Grid. So there we are, six Rows, four Columns, click. I achieve exactly the same Effect. Okay, now I’m going to try another method of Inserting a Table and this time I’m going to use one of the recent introductions into Word. Insert Table again and I’m going to Insert a Quick Table. Now a Quick Table is a Table that is already Formatted and already has some Data in it. And Word offers a number of these. I’m going to start by Inserting a Calendar for the month of May. Now although that clearly has Rows and Columns, you may notice that the top Row, the one that contains the word “May” only has a single Cell, whereas the others have seven for the days of the week. This one is a Merged Cell. The seven Cells in this Row have been Merged into one and this is one of the principles that we’re going to be using a lot when we’re looking at Tables. Let’s Undo that one. Let’s try doing an Insert of a different Quick Table. We’re now going to go down to this one which is one of the Greek Alphabet. We can see a larger number of Columns, a larger number of Cells, and of course we have some Symbols from other Alphabets in there as well. We’re now going to look at one more option for Inserting a Table into our document. We’re going to use the Draw Table option. Back to the Insert Tab, Table drop down, and this time

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Draw Table. The cursor changes to a pen and with that pen we can draw out a rectangle which we can then split into two parts. We now have a Table with one Row and two Columns. I can divide one of those Cells into two. I now have a Table with one Row and three Columns and so on. This option gives us a lot of flexibility for Drawing Tables of exactly the Size and Shape that we want. If you make a mistake and you want to Remove one of these Rows hold down the Shift key and you’ll notice that the Drawing pen turns into an Eraser. Go to the Row that you or the line that you want to Delete, press the Delete key, and it’s gone. To finish the Table click somewhere outside it and the Table is now ready to use. Once we’ve created a Table we enter Text into the Cells just as we would in a normal paragraph with one or two exceptions. The most important exception at the moment is that if we press the Tab key when we’re typing in a Table, it moves the cursor from Cell to Cell. Let’s enter some Text into a new Table. Insert, Table, I’m going to do one with three Rows and five Columns, and start typing.

Note that as I fill the width of the Cell, the Row height changes to

accommodate the amount of Text that I’m typing. Let’s just see that again. One of the things we need to know is how to select various parts of a Table. For instance, if we want to select the whole Table, we click on any Cell within the Table, go to the Layout Tab within Table Tools, locate Select, and click on Select Table. That selects the whole Table. Similarly if I click in a Cell, go to Select, and choose Select Row, it selects the whole Row. Click in a Cell, choose Select Cell, and the Cell is selected. By the way, if I have a Cell selected and I press the Delete key, it deletes all of the contents of that Cell. You can also Select using the mouse. For instance, to Select a Row move the cursor to the left of the Row until it changes into an arrow, click once, and the Row is selected. If I want to Select a particular Cell, move the cursor to the corner of the Cell, click once, and the Cell is selected. Finally in this section, we’re going to take a quick look at some of the simple modifications we can make to a Table. Most of these will be performed using some of the Commands on the Layout Tab. The Table Tools tab has two parts, Design Tab which is mainly about how the Table looks which we’re going to look at in the next section and the Layout Tab which allows us to control the number of Rows, the number of Columns, the heights and widths and so on. One of the most straight forward modifications we will want to make to a Table is to Add a Row or Add a Column. If we want to Add a Row, let’s say we wanted to add a row above this one,

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where the cursor is, we press Insert Above and we get a Row above. If we wanted to Insert a Column to the right of this one we click Insert Right. Note how Word changes the Column widths so that the additional Column, the sixth Column, fits into the space that’s available. Similarly, if we want to Delete, we use the Delete button here which says Delete Cells, Delete Columns, Delete Rows, Delete Table. This one allows us to Delete the Column that we’ve just Inserted.

We can also perform some options which give us more control over a more

complicated pattern for the Table. For instance, if I’ve got the cursor in a Cell here and I click on Split Cells, it gives the option of Splitting that Cell into either two or more Columns or two or more Rows. If I said two Rows and two Columns, look what happens to the Cell. We also have control over the Justification in our Table. We have a set of buttons here which control Vertical and Horizontal Justification. So, for instance, if I want Centered Top, that Aligns my Text from the top of the cell but with Center Justification. Let’s apply the same thing to that Cell or alternatively we could stick with Center Justification but Align with the bottom like so. That’s enough on some of the main points of modifications to a Table now. Let’s now look at a couple of Tables in practice.

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Video: Formatting Tables; Table Tools Toby: Welcome back. We’re now going to look at some Formatting options for Tables. In this section, we’re going to start with a Table I prepared earlier which shows the areas of the 50 States of the USA. The meanings of these Columns are not clear because this Table doesn’t have a Heading. So the first thing we’re going to do is to give our Table a Heading. We need to Insert a Row above the first Row. So we click anywhere in the first Row, go to the Layout Tab, and press Insert Above. That gives us a new Row. It’s a very, very short Row, so let’s Drag the top of that Row down. We’ve now got a bit more space to work in. I will now type in the first Row what the Column meanings are. As you can see, the meaning is this Column has the Total Area in square miles of the State, this one has the Land Area in square miles, this has the Water Area in square miles, and this shows the Percentage of the Total which is water. I’m going to start to improve the appearance of this Table by performing some basic modifications on it. First of all, it all seems extremely crowded so I’m going to select all of the Columns, effectively the whole Table which I can do with the mouse or using the Select button that we saw earlier and then from the Layout Tab I’m going to choose the Auto-fit option and I’m going to say Auto-fit Window. This now distributes the space available to the Columns according to their needs. Already I can see a great improvement at how readable this is. The next problem I’ve spotted is that the right hand column, which is the percentage of each State of water as a total, the Alignment is Left Aligned which never looks good with two digit numbers. So I’m going to Select that Column and I’m going to change the Alignment to Right Aligned. Again, that’s already an improvement. Now you may also notice that these numbers in each of the Cells are right up against the edges of the Cells. And I think again that makes it look very crowded. If I Select Cell Margins, I can increase the Default Cell Margin which means that with every Cell there will be more of a space. Click on OK. Again, already we’re seeing a little bit more space in our Table. I think that’s pretty good so far. Now let’s move onto the Color Scheme. We’re now going to look at some options to make our Table appear visually more appealing. So far we’re mostly working on the Layout Table within Table Tools. We’re now going to look for a while at the Design Tab. The Design Tab has at its center Table Styles. We can control the

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Shading and Borders on our Table using these drop downs, similar to the ones we saw for Text and paragraphs earlier. Or we also have a whole section here of Default Table Styles. A number of these available and if you look at each one you can see some of the main features in the Style indicates the Coloring on the Header, in this case it’s got a black background on the Header and something about the way that the individual Rows and Columns are arranged. Now before I do that, I need to point out one very important thing and I’m just going to flick back to the Layout Tab to show you. If you look at our Table at the moment you may think that it’s got Borders, but in fact it hasn’t. What it’s got are the Grid Lines that are by Default shown in Word. These are lines that let you show the Rows and Columns in a Table even if the Table doesn’t actually have Borders. If I switch these Grid Lines off, you can see that this Table doesn’t actually have any Borders at the moment. I’m going to stick with that for the moment, go back to Design, and again back to Table Styles. Now look at the effect of that one, for instance. There are Horizontal Borders on the Heading, but none between the individual Rows. Let’s scroll down and look at one or two other options. That one and here’s another interesting feature, Banding. This can look very attractive in this sort of Table where alternate Colored Banding gives us an Effect which actually helps the human eye to Align the numbers in quite a complex Table. So, there’s a whole raft there to choose from; I’m going to choose that one. That’s my Table Style. I can change individual details, both using Shading and Borders as we saw before and, for instance, I can click off the different Shading on the Header Row. I can click off the different markings on the first Column, which is currently Bold, and so on. To finish off this section we’re going to do some more work on our Table which will actually show us some of the other important features and facilities in Word for dealing with Tables. First of all, if I scroll down to the end of our Table, I can see that it doesn’t quite fit on one page. Now, to fix that problem I’m going to click anywhere inside the Table and I’m going to use one of the features we saw earlier which is Select Table. So that I make sure I have the whole Table selected. Then I’m going to go to the Home Tab, look at the Font Group, and hopefully you remember what that button does. That is a Shrink Font button that will make every Font, whatever Font, whatever Size it is, smaller in the area selected, which in this case is the whole Table. Click once, everything’s a bit smaller. Does it fit on a page now? Yes, it does. The Status Bar tells me I’m on Page 1 of 1. The next thing I’m going to do is to use another feature of Tables which we haven’t looked at so far, which is the ability to Sort the information in the

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Table. Now this basically, this List is sorted by Total Area. It begins with Alaska, the biggest State by a long way then Texas and so on. But supposing I wanted to make this an alphabetical list. Click anywhere in the Table, go to Table Tools Layout, and click on Sort which brings up a Sort Dialog. In this Sort Dialogue, I can choose what I want to order it by. I’m actually going to order it by State, but I could order it by Water Area, Land Area, Total Area, and so on. I’m going to order it by State. Click on OK. My Table now has the States in alphabetical order. Let’s just Undo that change and look at one other feature. We have total areas, total land areas, total water areas. Go down to the bottom of the Table. I’m going to add a Summary Row to the bottom of the Table. Now to add a Row we’ve already seen we can do an Insert below, but in fact if you click say in this Cell and press the Tab key, we know that the Tab key takes us through the Cells, but when the Tab key gets to the end of a Table it adds an extra Row. If I Tab along to that position under the Total Area Column and still on the Layout Tab Select Formula, it Defaults to putting in a Formula of Sum Above. I can choose a particular number Format if I’d like one. I’m going to just stick with the Default, click on OK, and it gives me a total area. Clearly I could do the same with these other two as well. So that’s it. That’s our summary of Tables in Word 2010. Let’s move on to look at Charts.

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Chapter 7 – Charts Video: Inserting Charts; Chart Tools Toby: Hello again. In this section we’re going to look at Charts. A Chart provides a graphical representation of Numerical Data. A Chart can make your document more interesting and informative. A Chart is usually a visual representation of a number of Data Series. Let’s Insert a simple Chart into a document and see how it works. We’ll start with a New Document. We go to the Insert Tab, click on Insert Chart, and the Insert Chart Dialog appears. There are many Chart Types to choose from. It is also possible to use a Manage Chart Templates; more on those later. Note that we can select one of the Charts and make it our Default Chart. Let’s start with a Column Chart. We now see a new Window containing an Excel Spreadsheet. The purpose of the Spreadsheet is to let us specify our Data Series. We’re going to use some of the Data we used in our Analysis of the Land Areas of U.S. States to fit in a few of the Cells in this Spreadsheet. So, Alaska, 663, 267, 571, 951; Texas. I’ll just do one more. Next in line is California. I’ve rounded the square mile figures to whole numbers. When we’ve finished entering Data, we just Close the Excel Worksheet. We have a Chart. Just before we move on, if you’re used to using an older version of Word, you have used Microsoft Graft to do Charts in Word; this has been replaced by the current approach. We can enter the Data into our Worksheet by typing or by Copying and Pasting from a different source. To modify Chart Data click to Select the Chart and a Chart Tools Tab appears. It has Tabs below it of Design, Layout, and Format. And we’ll be looking at all three of those. Let’s choose Design then Edit Data. We can actually Maximize the Worksheet. We don’t actually want Category 4 at the moment, so let’s Select the Row and use on the Excel Ribbon, Delete Sheet Rows. If we now Close our Worksheet again, we only have the three sets of Columns for the three States whose Data we’ve entered. So that’s how to Delete one set of Data. What about to Add a set? Well, I’ve changed my mind again, I do want four sets so I’m going to add Montana. So again click on the Chart to make sure it’s Selected. I’m on the Design Tab, click on Edit Data, and I’m going to put in here Montana, which is fourth in line with figures of 147,042, Close that, and there we are. I have a Chart that’s been updated with the figures for Montana.

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We can change the Chart Type using the button on the left on the Design Tab. Click and choose one of the other types of Column Chart. Let’s try a 3-D version. It really is as easy as that. Once we have selected a Chart Type, we can use the Chart Styles Gallery on the Design Tab to select a Color Scheme. Let’s try a couple of those. Let’s use that one. Once we have chosen the Style we like, we can Save it as a Template. Click on Save As Template and it is Saved as a Template with extension .crtx. Now let’s use that Chart Template to Draw a Chart for the first six States in our list. I’m going to Close this document with the existing Chart in it and I’m going to Open the document which has the State areas in it. Copy and Paste the Data for the first six and Copy that Data to the Clipboard. Now to Copy it I can either use the Copy button in the Clipboard Group or I can use the Keyboard Shortcut of Control-C. Now I’m going to Close this document, Open a new one, and I’m going to Insert a Chart. This time I’m going to use a Template, the one I Saved earlier, and I’m going to Paste in the Data that I Copied to the Clipboard. To Paste it in, in Excel, I can either use the Paste button or the Keyboard Shortcut of Control-V. Having done that, I Close the Worksheet and I have my updated Chart showing the first six States in order of Total Area. And finally in this section we’re going to look at how to Delete a Chart.

It’s quite

straightforward, Select the Chart. You’ll see the Selection markers all around it and then press either the Backspace key or the Delete key and it’s gone.

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Video: Creating Charts with Pre-existing Data Toby: Let’s now create a Chart using Data Pasted from an existing Table. I have a document I prepared earlier with Data for the populations of the world’s ten most populous Countries. Just find that, Recent Document, World Populations. I’m Copying the populations but not their percentages of the World total. Copy this Data to the Clipboard. I’m using the Keyboard Shortcut Control-C and then Close this document again. Now I’ll Create a New Document. I did that using the Control-N Keyboard Shortcut and then I did Insert Chart. This time I’m going to make a Bar Chart. I’m going to use the first one there. Click on OK and as usual the Chart appears with an Excel Worksheet beside it. Paste in my Data. I can either use the Paste button on the Excel Ribbon or the Keyboard Shortcut Control-V. I get a warning that the Data that I’m Pasting may not match the existing Grid allowance, four Rows and three Columns, but that’s fine because I’m going to tidy that up myself anyway. I’ve Pasted my Data in; I’ll just Drag this Column a little bit wider so you can see the numbers. Oh, wider still. And of course I’ve got two Columns of Data that aren’t doing anything, so let’s Delete those two Columns. To Delete the Columns in Excel, I Select the two with the mouse, click on the right mouse button, and choose Delete. If I now Close the Excel Worksheet, I have a first version of my Bar Chart showing the ten most populous Countries in the World. We can change the Titles and Labels on our Chart to make it more informative. First Select the Chart by clicking on it somewhere. On the Layout Tab click Chart Title. The options we have are to have No Title, to have a Centered Overlay Title which is what we have at the moment where the World Population, which is the Title, Overlays the Chart, or we can have a Title above the Chart. I’m going to put the Title above the Chart and I’m going to change the Title to “Ten Most Populous Countries.” Now I’m going to look at the Axis Titles. I’m going to start with the Primary Horizontal Axis Title. At the moment we have none. I’m going to Add a Title and I’m going to type in “Population.” And to just make it a little bit more informative, I’m going to put “Population 2008.” Now I’m going to look at the Vertical Axis Title. There’s none at the moment. We have three options for a Vertical Axis Title. We can have it Horizontal, Vertical, or Rotated. That’s quite important for a Vertical Axis Title because if you’re not careful, we can use up a lot of space putting a Horizontal Title on. Let me put one on here. The word we’re going to use is quite short, but it still uses a lot of space. The word is “Country.” But I think to

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make our Chart more impressive we could either have that Vertical Axis Title as a Vertical Title like this where the letters of the word “Country” appear above each other or even better, Rotate it, which is normally how I like to do it, like that. Finally, we can have a Legend. The Legend is currently here. A Legend on this particular Bar Chart serves no useful purpose because all of the information we need now is on the Chart. So I’m going to switch the Legend Off. And there we are. Let’s now look at some of the other major options we have when we are Formatting a Chart. In each case we’ll look at the effect on the World Top Ten Populous Countries Chart. Let’s start with Grid Lines. Grid Lines are two types, Horizontal Grid Lines, Vertical Grid Lines. Let’s turn the Primary Grid Lines On; you can see exactly what they are. They don’t really contribute anything in this Chart so let’s switch those Off again. And the Vertical Grid Lines, Major Grid Lines, as we can see are quite useful because they give us a visual reference for the 500 million and the thousand million or billion population. Let’s now look at Data Labels. These are currently not shown, but if I went for say Centered Data Labels, the number corresponding to each Bar in my Bar Chart is shown in the middle of the Bar. Some of these Bars are actually too short to put a number as long as that in, so that doesn’t really work. In this case it’s much more sensible to choose the option Outside End and you can see what that does. I can now see the actual numbers of the populations of each Country to the Outside End of the Bar. I can also have some very interesting Coloring Effects to give my Chart a little bit more substance as well. To best show this here, I’m going to change the Chart Type. So I’m going back into Design; you remember Change Chart Type on the left. I’m going to stick with a Bar, but I’m going to go for a 3-Dimensional option like this one. As you may remember before, I can choose my Color here and so on, but I’m going to back to Layout and I’m going to look at the Wall on the Floor. Let’s start with the Floor, the Chart Floor, which is the bit down there. I can actually show the Chart Floor, but I can also give it some Color. At the moment it’s got No Fill so it’s basically seethrough. Let’s go for Solid Fill. It’s actually given me a Default Color there which is probably quite a good Color so I’m going to stick with that one and now Chart Wall. Again, I’m going to show the Chart Wall but I’m going to choose a Color. I think given the Color of the Bars something like that is ideal. So there’s a nice Wall Color. That’s starting to give my Chart a little bit more substance. I can also change the 3-D Rotation Effect. Currently, it’s 20% Rotation in the X, 15% Rotation in the Y. Let’s make it a bit more. You can see the effect of

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that as well. There are various other Tools we can use. We can Draw a Text Box anywhere we like on the Chart. We can introduce one of a very large range of Shapes if we want to point something out or emphasize something. We can even Insert a Picture as a Background or another Object on the Chart. So that pretty much shows a lot of the Layout options. One final thing I’m going to do though is to show how we can make the whole Chart a bit bigger. If I go back to Page Layout and change the Orientation of my document to Landscape and use the Zoom Slider to get the Page in View, I can then stretch my Chart to use a lot more paper. I now have a much bigger Chart. It’s probably at the sort of size that I could give out at a presentation or certainly put into a PowerPoint as a full size page and so on. So using some of the skills that we learned earlier about Page Layout, Page Setup, and Sizing and so on and the Charting skills that we’re learning now, we start to put together some much more impressive documents. That’s it for Charts for now, although we will be coming back to them again later on.

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Chapter 8 – Desktop Publishing Video: Adding Drop Caps, Watermarks, Borders, Page Colors Toby: Welcome back. Desktop Publishing, or DTP as it’s often called, means producing documents at your desktop that are of good enough quality to be published. One of the most important aspects of this is the combination of Text, Graphics, and Effects to produce good looking, high-quality documents.

Microsoft Word enables this by providing powerful and

flexible Drawing Tools and sophisticated page make-up facilities. In the next few sections, we’re going to learn about these. Let’s start with a very simple but useful example of how DTP can add a professional touch to one of our documents. Position the cursor at the beginning of our document about Sydney and then from the Insert Tab select the drop down next to Drop Cap. At the moment we have no Drop Cap selected. A Dropped Capital means that the first Capital in the paragraph, in this case, is made larger and Drops down into subsequent lines. This is quite a common newspaper effect amongst others. We can also ask for an In Margin Drop Cap, which means that the Capital is still made larger but moved into the Margin of the document. There is also an option of calling up the Drop Cap Dialog. We have the same choice of three options. We’ll go for the Dropped Capital, but we could actually decide how many lines we want to drop into and how much distance we want between the Text and the Drop Capital itself. So, let’s put say half a centimeter, five millimeters in there; see what effect we get. There we are. Next let’s look at another simple but very useful effect, the Watermark. A Watermark is a Background Effect that can be used either to enhance the appearance of a page or to enforce the status of a document, for example, to show that it is in Draft Form or is Confidential. Let’s look at both of those. Click on Page Layouts then hover over Watermark. Note the Tool Tip. Insert Ghosted Text behind the content on the page. This is often used to indicate that a document is to be treated specially, such as Confidential or Urgent. Let’s click on the drop down. The simplest option is to Insert one of the Standard Watermarks. Let’s choose the first one. You may just be able to see the word “Confidential” in the background of my page, however it is rather faint. Let’s Customize our Watermark. Custom Watermark. We now have the Printed Watermark Dialog. The options are No Watermark, a Picture Watermark that we’ll look at in a little while, Text Watermark. The Text Watermark tells us what the Text actually is, in this case, it’s the

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word “Confidential.” Font and Size. The reason that it’s so faint, which is quite often how we would want it to be, is we have a light gray color and a Semi-transparent option selected. Let’s remove the Semi-transparent option, click on Apply.

You can probably see the word

“Confidential” more clearly now, diagonally across the page, but just in case you can’t I’m going to choose a black and Apply that and now you should definitely see the word “Confidential.” The Apply button on this dialog is quite a common one in Word Dialog. It enables you to Apply a change without actually Closing the Dialog so that if you change your mind you can easily go back to the way things were. Let’s change the Color of this Watermark back to a very light Color again. Restore the Semi-transparent, Apply again, and there we have a very faint word, “Copyright” in the background yet again. It’s also easy to use a Picture as a Watermark. Let’s use our Sydney Opera House Picture from earlier. Page Layout, Watermark, Custom Watermark, Picture, Select Picture, Opera House, Apply. You may just be able to make out the Picture in the background. The reason it’s so faint is that we have the Washout check box here selected. I’ll remove that and click on Apply again. Normally, we would choose a Picture that achieves the right effect for our Page Size and Orientation. The Size of the Picture can be adjusted to achieve the desired effect. We can also use Washout to make the Picture a very, very faint background image. Finally, we can remove a Watermark either by specifying No Watermark in the Printed Watermark Dialog or returning to the drop down by Watermark, we have an option Remove Watermark. That’s it for Watermarks for now. Let’s move on to looking at Adding a Page Border. In Word, we can put a Border around selected Text, a Table Cell, a paragraph, or even a whole page. We can Apply various effects to Borders such as Shadow and 3-D. Let’s look at some of the options for using Page Borders. Let’s change our Sydney document so that we can see at least a whole page in view. Let’s look at two pages. Select the Page Layout Tab, then Page Borders. On the Page Border Tab we can click any combination of the available buttons to achieve the Border we want. Some buttons, such as None and Box, affect the whole Border. Some, such as Top and Bottom, only affect one Border. We can choose a Style of Border, a Color, and a width. We can also Apply Artifacts. Note the Apply To option. We can Apply a Border to a whole document or just one Section of it. We haven’t looked at Sections yet, but we’re going to look at them soon; so we’ll come back to this at that time. Let’s make some

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selections and see how it looks. Let’s have a Box. Let’s choose that Style of Border. We’ll stick with, no let’s have a Theme Color. Let’s go for that Theme Color and a width of 1.5 points. No Art for the moment and click on OK. That’s not bad. Now let’s try a little Shading. On the Borders and Shading Dialog, one of the Tabs is Shading. Back to it again, Shading. Let’s Apply a little Theme Aware Shading. Now, although the Page Border applies to the whole document, the Shading only applies to the paragraph the cursor is in. So, if I choose a Theme Aware Shading Color of say that one, click on OK. You can see that the Shading only applies to the paragraph where the cursor was. To apply it to the whole document, we need to Select all of the Text in the document. You may remember a shortcut to that, which was Control-A, back into Page Borders, Shading again. Let’s choose the same Color, click on OK. Now we can see a very different effect. Let’s now apply a Page Color to our document. The Page Color button is on the Page Layout Tab in the Page Background Group. Click on the drop down. We can hover over a few of the available colors, see the effect. That one looks good to me. And finally let’s go back to the Page Borders option and apply an Artifact. Most of these will be a little outrageous for a serious document, but this document is travel related and not too serious, so let’s make it a little easier on the eye. What about that one? We can see that the Tools in Word support a straightforward approach to DTP, with a little Design flare we can produce very attractive documents. Even without that flare, there are plenty of Default and Standard Themes and Styles to help us out. In the next section, we’re going to look at some more Tools and we’re going to introduce some Graphics. See you then.

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Video: Using/Formatting Multi-Columns; Text Boxes Toby: Welcome back to DTP. Earlier, we looked at how to make a page Multi-Column. Well now it’s time to go into more detail; as Multi-Column work is very important in DTP. Newspapers, Newsletters, Brochures, and many web pages are Multi-Column. We’ll Re-open our Sydney document, but this time we’ll just work with the original Text while we look at Word 2010s Multi-Column features. First of all, we don’t need to have the same number of Columns on all pages in a document. Let’s Select part of our Sydney document, just the part before the Visa information part. Then let’s go to the Page Layout Tab, click the drop down next to Columns, and specify two Columns. We can use a Zoom Slider control to get a better view of our document. One quick way of further Formatting this arrangement while the Text is still Selected, is to right click somewhere in the two Column area, Select Paragraph, and we’re going to change the Justification to Justified.

Full Justification in narrow Columns means that

sometimes large spaces can appear, but we can enable Hyphenation to improve things. Let’s do that now. We’ll choose Automatic. Next we’re going to look at ways of Formatting a document with multiple Columns. Click on the Columns drop down again and choose More Columns. We can see the Columns Dialogue. There are several options available. We could specify More Columns. We could put a line between the Columns. We can change either the Column width or the spacing between the Columns. The Columns don’t have to be of equal width. We can uncheck this box and then have Columns with different widths. What we’re going to do in this case is we’re going to put a line between the Columns and we’re going to slightly increase the spacing. Note that as I increase the spacing, the width of the Columns has to decrease automatically to give me more space. I’ll just say 1.5 cm, click on OK and you can see the affect. If I slide a little bit more, the Vertical line comes into view. Finally, let’s take a look at some of the spaces at the bottoms of our Columns. Why is there so much wasted space? Well the answer is simple, although we need to look at a concept that may be new to you. When spreading a paragraph across Columns or pages, Word can try to keep whole paragraphs or sometimes parts of paragraphs together. This avoids situations where a first line can be separated from the rest of a paragraph, which is called a Widow, or a single line can be on its own at the end of a paragraph, called an Orphan. We can stop this by specifying that we do not want Widow and Orphan control. Right click anywhere

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within the two Column Section, click on Paragraph, and look at Line and Page Breaks. All three of these checked items are what are causing the wasted space. Keep Lines together which means we’re trying to keep all the lines of a paragraph together. We’re saying keep this paragraph with the next one and we’re saying apply Widow and Orphan control. In other words, make sure we don’t have one line at the beginning or one line at the end of a paragraph on their own, then click on OK, and we can see now that we’re using all of the space on the page. In fact, we have a very fine level of control over this behavior with Word. But for the moment this basic level of understanding is enough. Now we’re going to Insert some independent Text on a page. This is not in the normal flow of the document and it isn’t a Header or similar feature. Let’s Insert a Text Box at the start of the Visa Information Section. So we go down to that Section, Insert the cursor, then from the Insert Menu choose Text Box. There are a number of options available, let’s choose Simple Text Box, and type in the Text, “Important Information for Travelers.” Note that the Box is now going to need to be Sized and Moved. But as you Move it around the Text around it might change. So sometimes it can seem a little tricky to get it into position, in just the Shape and Size that we need. But don’t worry, when it’s just right we can slide it into position and then Word provides plenty of Tools for fine tuning. First, note that while the Text Box is selected, we have a Drawing Tools Tab and we can apply the Tools on that to our Text Box. Let’s adjust the Size first. We could use the Size control, but I’m going to Drag it with the handles to get it approximately the Size that I want. That looks good. And now I’m going to use some of the Style Effects to get the Box looking quite prominent. So let’s look at the Shape Styles. There’s that one, that one, that one. Let’s go with that one and I can Apply Fill. I want this to be quite a dramatic box so I’m going to use one of the red Theme Aware Colors. That one looks fine. And for a Shape Effect I think I’m going to look at Shadow or Glow. I think I might go with the Glow Effect, perhaps that one. There we are. Now, I’m going to Move this into position. If I hover the cursor over the Box, look for the four-arrow crosshair cursor, Drag the Box into position. I want it about there. At the moment, it’s going over the Text. It’s not set to Wrapped the Text around it. So I could use the Wrap Text drop down to choose the affect that I want, which is going to be square, but another alternative is to use the Position drop down which combines the actual position of the Box with how I want the Text to Wrap. And that’s pretty much the Effect that I want there. So that’s pretty good. Finally, I’m going to Align the Text in

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the Box. It’s Left Aligned at the moment. I’m going to Center it. So, if I click on there I can Center the Text like that and I’ve got something that’s a bit more like the Effect that I want to achieve.

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Video: Inserting/Resizing Shapes Toby: Hello again. We’re going to start to learn about Shapes now. Word supplies a good collection of ready-made Shapes. You can find them on the Insert Tab under Illustrations, Insert Shapes, and there’s a whole range to choose from. Let’s use a simple arrow for now. When I’ve selected the Shape that I want, I get a crosshair cursor and I Drag to achieve the Size and Shape that I require. Once we have the Shape, we can use the Sizing Handles to Resize it. Let’s try that now. In fact, we’ve done quite a lot of Resizing before, so let’s go into a bit more detail here. When we have Sizing Handles, the ones on the top, bottom, and sides change the Shape in only one direction. Look what happens when I use the bottom one on this arrow. Now see what happens with the right one. The overall proportions of the Shape are not maintained. We make it fatter or thinner as we work on it. But if we use the corner Handles, they maintain the Shape. Look what happens with the bottom right hand corner Handle. Of course, if we want to Resize with precise measurements, we use the right tool for the job. While our Shape is Selected, the Drawing Tools Tab is available and on the right hand end of the Format Tab, we have the Size button. We can either use the height and width controls or we can use the Launcher to get the Layout Dialog. Within the Layout Dialog, we can adjust Position, Text Wrapping, and Size. Let’s set the Size of our button to 10 centimeters by 10 centimeters for now. Okay. Now let’s look at some special types of Shape. Let’s get rid of my arrow. I could use Undo, but the quickest way is to Select the Shape then press the Delete key. Suppose I want to Insert a perfect circle, or for that matter a perfect square; select the oval from the Insert Shapes control. There’s the oval and Draw my circle. Now it’s actually quite difficult to get a perfect circle, so let me Undo that, repeat this, Insert Shape, select the oval. But before I start Dragging the Shape, I’m going to hold down the Shift key. If I hold down the Shift key, I get a perfect circle. And a similar approach can give us a perfect square. Let’s Undo that one and now Insert a Free-form Shape. Free-form Shape is here. Tool Tip tells us it’s Free-form and it’s in the Lines part of the Gallery. With a Free-form Shape we can Draw pretty much anything that we want. If we click in one place and then click in another, we get a straight line. But if we hold the mouse button down, we can Draw any kind of Shape that we like. Click near the end and we get a Closed Shape. And note how Word puts a Fill Color in for us, which we can of course change. We have Closed the Shape there. It is also possible to Draw

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Open Shapes where the ends do not meet. Obviously, you couldn’t Fill the Color on an Open Shape, but sometimes it’s useful to be able to do that. So a Free-form Shape can be Open or Closed. Now let’s see how easy it is to add Text to a Shape. Basically we make sure that the Shape is Selected and we start typing. I’m going to Insert an arrow again. So Insert, Shapes, choose the first block arrow in the Gallery, Drag the cursor, and start typing. Arrow One. The Text becomes part of the Shape and if we Move the Shape the Text moves with it. If we Rotate the Shape, let’s see what happens. All the time that the Shape is selected we have the Drawing Tools Format Tab. The Rotate control is this one, click on Rotate, Rotate through 90-degrees. You can see that the arrow Rotates, but so does the Text. Rotate left 90-degrees, a similar effect. We can basically use any of the tools on the Drawing Tab, Drawing Tools Format Tab to work on our Shape with its Text and the Text moves accordingly. Let’s stick with Arrow One as it is for now and work on that. When we have a Shape selected we can easily apply a Shape Style to it. We can use the Shape Effects feature to Preview a range of options, including Shadows and Reflections. And, of course, we have the usual options for Fill and Outline. They’re all provided on the Drawing Tools Format Tab. Shape Fill applies to the inside of a Closed Shape. Shape Outline applies to the edge of any Shape. Let’s look at all of these in more detail than before. If we Select Shape Fill for our arrow, we have a full palette of colors to choose from. We can Preview the effect of each. Let’s choose that one. If we choose Shape Outline, we have a choice of Colors for the Outline of the Shape and, again, we can Preview the effect of those as we go. And Shape Effects allows us to go Preset, Shadow, Reflection, and so on. Let’s try Reflection; like that one. If we go back to Shape Fill where we’ve chosen that lighter color, we also have some further options. One of the options we have is Picture where we can actually Insert a Picture as the background to our Shape. There we have Sydney Opera House in the background; rather nicely Reflected below. I’m going to Undo that. We also have Shape Fill Gradient. Gradient lets us use two or more Colors that gradually fade into each other. So, for instance, we could use that Effect where the Fill is darker in the middle. Another option on Shape Fill is Texture where we can choose from a whole palette of Textures to achieve a desired effect. Apart from the Texture effect itself, we can see the effect on the Reflection. With so many options to choose from, it can be rather

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bewildering when you first try to use Shapes in Word. The best approach, usually, is to start with simple options and not to use too many Effects. Then as your knowledge and confidence grow, gradually try further options. But with all of these features and effects it’s very easy to overdo things, so don’t get carried away. That’s it for now. In the next section, we’re going to look at how we group objects together.

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Video: Stacking, Grouping Objects Toby: Welcome back. In this chapter, we’re going to be looking at how we can use Groups of Objects when we’re using the DTP features of Word. Let’s start with three arrows all basically the same. Having Inserted the first, I’m going to use another Keyboard Shortcut, Control and Y repeats the last operation. Let’s then scatter them around our page. Now, Select all three and we’re going to look at some of the Alignment options. As we have Shape selected, the Drawing Tools Tab is available and over here on the right is the Align button. Click on the drop down and let’s try Align Top. Note how they all Align with the Top of the useable area of the page, as defined by the Margins in this case. Let’s Undo that Alignment. Let’s try a different one. Let’s try Align Right. Again, Undo and finally Align Center. This ability to Align Objects with each other and with some reference features in our document proves very useful in DTP. One other very important aspect of Alignment is the Grid and we’ll look at that next. My three arrows are still in View. Now let’s select the View Tab and use one of the controls that we didn’t look at earlier which is the Grid Lines control. It’s a check box. We check it on and we see the Grid Lines. These can be used to Align Objects on the page. To get fine control over what we can do with the Grid and as an alternative way of switching it on or off, provided one of the Shapes on our page is selected, we’ll have access to the Drawing Tools Format Tab. We can go to the Align button. The drop down there gives us access to an alternative check box for switching on and off the viewing of Grid Lines. And this Menu option here, Grid Settings, which brings up the Drawing Grid Dialog. The Drawing Grid Dialog contains many settings, including Snap Objects to other Object which we’ll look at in a moment; the spacing of the Grid Lines. I’m actually going to increase the spacing of the Grid Lines to make it easier for us to see the effect of Snapping and various other controls including this one which says whether we should Snap Objects to the Grid even when the Grid Lines are not displayed. I’m going to check that one on and click OK. Now let’s take one of my arrows and start to Move it around. As I move it around, it doesn’t move smoothly, it jumps from Grid Line to Grid Line. Because of its Shape, it cannot be against every Grid Line in every position because, for instance, its height is just not right. It can’t touch a Grid Line at the top and a Grid Line at the bottom. So it will do one or the other. But obviously which ones it Snap to will partly at least depend on what the Shape of the Object is itself. If we want to temporarily override Snapping, we can actually hold

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down the Alt key while we move something around and then it moves around smoothly without Snapping. So, using the Grid can help us to Align Objects on a page. Let’s change the Grid Spacing back to how it was before and look at Stacking Order. When we have multiple Shapes in a document, they have a Stacking Order which we can change. Let’s take our three arrows and change their Sizes and Colors so that we can see which is which. I’m going to start with that one, keep it blue, there. This one, make it a little bit bigger, change the Fill to a red color, put it there. Take this one, make it a bit bigger as well, change its Fill to a green color. Let’s go for that one. You can see the Stacking Order of those now because clearly the green one is above the red one. If we have one of those Objects selected, we can use these commands, Bring Forward and Send Backward to change the Stacking Order. So, for instance, Send Backward, go on the drop down, Send Backwards, send that one Object you could see it move then behind the red. If I select the red arrow now and do a Bring Forward; look at the red and the blue, Bring Forward, the red is now in front of the blue. When you have Shapes that overlap, it’s necessary to be able to do that. Sometimes it’s difficult to Select an Object at the back of a stack. The trick is to Select one of the Objects, in this case the red one, and then if we press the Tab key, it Selects the next Object which is the blue one, press again, it’s the green one. If you have a lot of Objects Tab successively cycles through the Objects; Shift and Tab cycles through them in the opposite direction. Word 2010 has also introduced a useful feature called the Selection Pane, which is here. I’m going to Select that on and that gives us another Pane. With this, you can select any of the available Objects. A nice easy way of doing that and you can change the Stacking Order using the buttons at the bottom here. Sometimes when we have a number of Objects together, it is useful to be able to move them around together as a unit. To do this, we Group them. When they are Grouped, Objects keep their individual attributes. To do some things to individual Objects in the Group, however, we have to Ungroup the items, do what we need to do, and then Group them again. Let’s use the three arrows that we all ready have, blue, green, and red. Select them all, then using the Group button here click on the Group option. Note what happens to the Outline of the Group and the Sizing Handles. If we use the Sizing Handles to increase the Size of the Group, each individual Object within the Group is resized as well. To Ungroup the items, we use the Ungroup option. If you’ve used an earlier version of Word, you may have used a Regroup button. This is not

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available in Word 2010. To Regroup Objects, select the Objects as before and use the Group button again. We have now completed this review of the DTP facilities of Word, including handling Shapes, Groups, and so on. In the next chapter, we’re going to move onto use many of things we’ve learned in longer documents.

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Chapter 9 – Long Document Features Video: Creating Outline, Sub-Documents Toby: Welcome back. When we need to produce a Long Document, it’s often the case that the work on the document needs to be split between a number of Authors. The Authors need to be able to work separately on their parts of the document, but we need to be able to bring the work together to produce a consistent and good looking document whenever we need to. In this chapter, we’re going to look at how to produce a Long Document. In doing that, we’ll cover some other important features of Word 2010 including Inserting a Table of Contents and Inserting Headers and Footers. Let’s get started. One of the Views we looked at earlier was Outline View. Let’s select it on this new empty document. Do you remember how? That’s right, use the button near the bottom right. I’m going to type a Heading for the first part of my Long Document. It’s “Introduction.” Now press Enter. I could type another Heading, but instead I’m going to press Tab to add a Sub-heading. It’s “History.” As I type I can use the Outline Tools in the top left to control the levels of my Headings. Note that the current Heading is at Level 2. I can use the Promote button to Promote it to Level 1 or the Demote button to demote it back to Level 2 or to Level 3 and so on. These Heading Levels are very important. Apart from being the basis for the structure of our document, they feature strongly in the Formatting as well. You may well have noticed that many of the Styles we’ve seen have been referred to as Heading 1 or Heading 3 or similar. We’re soon going to find out what that’s all about. Let’s put in some more Level 2 Headings; Water, Suburbs, Attractions, Farther Afield. We now want a new Level 1 Heading, Visa Information. We can either Promote then type or type then Promote. So press Enter, Promote this to Level 1 and type “Visa Information.” We now have our document Outline. Let’s Close Outline View using the button. We’re now looking at our document in the familiar Print Layout View; the one we normally use. If I select the Home Tab on the Ribbon, we can see the Style selected for this paragraph, the Heading Visa Information is Heading 1. If I go to this paragraph, Suburbs, the Style selected is Heading 2. We can now see the link between the Heading Levels in our document and the Styles that are used. Before we move on, let’s Save this document with the name “Enjoying Sydney.”

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Let’s go back into Outline View. We’re going to split this document up into two Sections so that we can work on them separately. The Section on Visa Information will be a document in its own right. What we have now will be the Master Document and the document on Visa Information will be a Sub-document. Click in Visa Information, then Show Document, then click Create. Note that the Heading is Outlined and a small icon appears in the corner to show that this is a Sub-document. Before we move on to creating the Sub-document as a separate file, let’s press Show Document again and see what happens. A pair of double lines appears across the page with the words “Section Break Continuous.” I mentioned Sections earlier and here they are. As the name implies, a Section is part of a document. One Section can share many things with other Sections in a document or it can be different. For example, one Section can have very different Formatting to the rest of the document. Where a document is divided into Sub-documents, the Sub-documents are separate Sections; even if they share all of their Formatting and other features with the rest of the document. The significance of the word “Continuous” is that the Text will flow from the Master to the document, Sub-document on the page without a Page Break or other interruption. When the document’s prepared, the existence of a Sub-document will be seamless. Somebody reading the document would not realize that it was produced from Sub-documents. Sometimes we want the flow to be Continuous, but sometimes we don’t. Click Show Document and double click the icon. Word Opens a new window with the Heading “Visa Information in a New Document.” Word has Created our Sub-document for us and has given it a Default name. We’re going to Save the Sub-document with a different name, “Australia Visa Information.” Let’s do that now. Then we Close the Sub-document, then Close the Master Document. Now let’s put some content into our documents. Let’s Open our original document about Sydney again. Long weekend in Sydney. Let’s scroll down to the Section on Visa Information and Copy the Text, Drag over it with the mouse, use the Control-C Keyboard Shortcut, and that Text is Copied to the Clipboard. We can now Close that document again and we can Open Australia Visa Information, which is on the Recent Documents List. Put the cursor under the Heading, use Control-V to place the Copied Text into that document. Now let’s Close that document and we’ll Save the changes. Now let’s look at Enjoying Sydney, the Master Document. We still have Introduction, the Heading Level 1 and these Heading Level 2’s underneath it, but in this area which is the area for the Sub-document, we have a few symbols but can’t really see too much else. If we click on Expand Sub-

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documents, we get some of the information about Visa Information that we’ve just Pasted into the other document. The reason we’ve only got a little of it is because of this check box here, Show first line only. This is actually a very useful feature if you just want to trace certain parts of a very long, maybe complicated document, just see enough of each line to know what it’s about. We really want to see the whole lot here, so let’s uncheck that box and there we are, there’s all of our Text in our Master Document with the Sub-document still shown in its Outline as a separate document in Outline View. In our original Sydney document, there was another Section about Currency and we’re going to look at how to deal with that next.

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Video: Expand/Collapse Sections; Document Properties; Cover Pages Toby: Welcome back. While you were away, I’ve Copied most of the rest of the Text from the original Sydney document to our new Master Document and we’ll take a quick look at that now. In Print Layout View, the document looks pretty much the same as it did before. Formatting has changed a little, but the content is pretty much the same. I’ve added some Headings of course. In Outline View, we can see the structure quite clearly now. In the Introduction, much of the Text is not Headings but its Body Text, which is the Default condition for Text in a document. Clicking on Show Document reveals which parts of the document are in separate documents. So, for instance, here we can see the Visa Information.

If we unclick, we don’t see the

connection to another document but we do see the Section breaks. Back to the beginning of our document again, there are arrows here, plus and minus, which Expand or Collapse Sections. So, for instance, if I click on History and press the Collapse, the Text under History is hidden; although there’s a symbol here to show there’s Text there. This can make it very useful to read part of a document where you’re not really particularly interested in reading the rest of it. You can achieve the same affect by double clicking on these Headings, so that Minimizes or Collapses, and the Maximizes or Expands. Another very useful feature is this pair of Wedges which will Move parts of the document up or down. History is selected, if I click on this Down Wedge it Moves that Section down below a paragraph of Water and so on. It’s a very easy way of moving Sections of a document around. If I Collapse these Level 2 Headings, History, Water, Suburbs, Attractions, Farther Afield, I can click one such as Suburbs, Move it up, Expand it there, and there it is. Let’s put it back where it was. However, the Section on Currency is still missing and I’m going to Create and include that now. Let’s Open our original Sydney document again. Scroll down to the Section on Currency and Copy it to the Clipboard. Close the document, Create a new blank document using the Keyboard Shortcut Control-N, Paste the contents of the Clipboard. Save this new document with a name of “Australia Currency” and Close that. We now have another Sub-document, but how do we include it in the Master Document? Let’s see. We’re back at our new Master Document, Enjoying Sydney. We’re in Outline View. We position the cursor right at the end of the document which is where we want the Currency Section to go and we click on the Insert button. This asks us to Select the document we want to include. It’s that one. We get some warnings

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about Styles in terms of one Style overriding another type of Style. We’re going to say Yes to all of these and we’ll come back to these questions later on. But there is our Currency Section now included in the document. So I now have a Master Document with its various Sub-sections, Level 2 Headings, and two Sub-documents, each of them you can tell they’re Sub-documents by the icon here and the Outline. If I click off Show Document, the Text looks just as it would in a normal document. Section breaks are there to remind us about the Section breaks, but other than that it’s the same. If I go back into Print Layout View, my normal View, you would barely notice the difference with the original document other than the slight change of Style and the Introduction of the Headings. So somebody looking at this wouldn’t necessarily know that we’ve actually got quite a specific structure to the whole document. Next we’re going to look at some of the other features we’ll often want to include in all of our documents, but particularly long ones. Earlier we briefly looked at Document Information and Properties. Let’s review how to set those up. Open Backstage View, click on Info, and then click on Properties. Although we can look at Advanced Properties, sometimes quite useful to use this feature, Show Document Panel which Opens a Properties box above a document. The Author is here. Let’s put a Title on the document. Let’s say it’s called “Enjoying Sydney.” The Subject is Sydney and comments “A tour of Sydney and its many attractions.” I can then Close that Panel. I can again Backstage View, Info, Properties, Advanced Properties which is what we looked at before, and on the Summary we see the comments I’ve included, Title, Subject, and so on. Don’t forget this is also where you can see the Statistics on the document, the number of pages, the number of paragraphs, lines, words and characters, including spaces at the end there; so, useful information there. We’re going to be using some of this information in the features we’re going to be adding to our document over the next couple of sections. The first thing I’m going to do is to Insert a Cover Page. There are a number of Standard Cover Pages provided with Word 2010 that I can choose from. Or I can Design one myself. On the Insert Tab, next to Cover Page, there’s a small drop down, we have Standard Cover Pages here; quite a selection of them.

And we also have an option of looking at Cover Pages from

Office.com. Here you can see the option to remove a Cover Page. Let’s look at something suitable for, there we are. That will look quite impressive. One of the things you will notice is

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that the Title, Enjoying Sydney, has already been Copied into the Cover Page. In fact, this is the Title Field that we just set-up in Properties in Backstage View. The Author’s name is there as well, but not the year. So I’m going to type the year in now. The year is 2010, so that’s fine. Move further down the Cover Page and there is a space here for an abstract. I’m going to type something very short because as you’ll realize by now I’m not particularly good typist. I’m going to say, “Things to do in and around Sydney.” That’s quite enough typing for me for the moment. I can also put in here information like company name, company address, and so on. I’m going to leave those as they are for the moment to save time. So we have a number of Standard Cover Pages. If I just Zoom out so we get a better view, look at pages side-by-side. We can see we’ve already got a document that’s looking increasingly attractive. So now we have our document with a nice Cover Page. One thing we could quite quickly do to improve the Cover Page would to be put in a more relevant Picture. The Objects on the Cover Page are either individual Objects or in the case of these, Grouped Objects. We know how to deal with those, so we can Re-align, Re-format the whole of this page if we want to, but for the moment, let’s Insert a Picture. Let’s use our Picture of Sydney Opera House again. It’s slightly smaller than the Sunflower Picture. Let’s get rid of the Sunflower Picture by selecting it and pressing on Delete. And then the next job would be to Re-size the Picture of Sydney Opera House, move these Text boxes around and generally tidy up the Cover Page. But we’ll do that later. For the moment, we’re going to move on in the next section to some of the other features we need in longer documents.

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Video: Add Table of Contents; Header & Footer Tools; Quick Parts Toby: Welcome back. While you were away, I tidied up the Cover Page and now we’re going to add some more useful features into our document, starting with a Table of Contents. A Table of Contents provides an Outline of the main topics and page locations for a document. Entries in the Table of Contents correspond to the Heading Levels in the document. Let’s place the cursor right at the beginning of the content of our document, select the References Tab, and on the left Table of Contents. Click on the drop down. The Menu contains some Standard Styles for the Table of Contents. Let’s use one of those. The first one, just to see what happens. Let’s just use the Zoom Slider to see the result. The Table of Contents is Inserted and the Headings are each included. Indentation shows the relative Heading Levels: Level 1, Level 2, and so on. Near the top left of the Table of Contents is a control that says Update Table. If we work on our document, we may need to Update the Table of Contents as Page Numbers may have changed. We may have included a new Section or removed a few paragraphs. It’s always a good idea to Update the Table of Contents before Saving or Printing a document. Note the button in the Table of Contents Group, Update Table. Let’s Undo that Table of Content and look at some of the other options. Let’s choose Insert Table of Contents. We get the Table of Contents Dialog. Let’s look at some of the options. We have a choice of Tab Leader. These are the lines that connect the names with the Page Numbers, in this case, Dotted. We can choose different Shapes for the Tab Leaders, Dashed or Continuous, for instance. Formats. For our Formats, we use the ones from the Template that’s in force for this document, which unless we’ve chosen otherwise, of course is the Normal Template. If we want to Modify, then Table of Contents Levels correspond to Heading Levels and we could, for example, for a Table of Contents entry for a Heading Level 1 item in our document, we could Modify the Table of Contents 1 Style here. We’re not going to change any of those at the moment. We can say how many Levels we want to show in our Table of Contents. So instead of one or two or three, we could have four or whatever. Let’s just do the next one with Level 1. And on the web pages, where we’re actually writing not a document to be used like the one we’re working on now, but where we’re actually writing web pages, instead of Page Numbers we can use Hyperlinks so that users can click on a Hyperlink to go to the part of the document that they want to. I’m now going to click on OK. Let’s see what happens. I get a Table of Contents, but because I’ve specified only Level 1, I

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only get the Level 1 entries; Introduction Page 1, Visa Information Page 2, and so on. So I’m going to Undo that, Insert a new Table of Contents, Level 2 and leave everything else the same, click on OK. It’s actually possible to compile a Table of Contents Manually or to add individual paragraphs to the Table of Contents if we need to; although we won’t be covering that here. Headers and Footers are included in many documents to help the reader and writer to keep track of where they are. These will often include things like the page number, the date, the document name, and so on. Let’s add a Header to our new document. Click on the Insert Tab. There’s a drop down next to Header. Let’s use the first one, Blank. We now see a Line that separates the Body of the document from our new Header and a space in which to type our Header. We also have a Header and Footer Tools Design Tab. We could pretty much type anything we like in here, but I’m going to Insert one of the Quick Parts. A Quick Part is a piece of information about the document we’re working on or sometimes something else and I’m going to use one of the Document Properties. In this case, I’m going to choose the Title. Now I’ve already set-up the Title for this document in Backstage View. It’s Enjoying Sydney and now I’m going to Center that using Home and then Centering the paragraph. There we are. If I go back to the Header and Footer Tools Design Tab, press Close Header and Footer, and my Header is finished. If I scroll through the whole document, I will see that that Header is now on all of the pages of my document. Unfortunately it’s also on the first one, which is my Cover Page. It looks a bit strange. I don’t really need a Header on the Cover Page. But if I go back into the Header, double click, gets me back into the Header and Footer Tools Section, there’s a little button here, Different First Page that I can check. Close Header and Footer again. If I now look back at the first page, the Headers gone. That’s great. Let’s now Insert a Footer. The procedure is pretty much the same. Insert Footer. This time I’m going to choose the Standard one that’s called “Blank Three Columns.” Note that Different First Page is not currently checked. I’m going to need to check that to make sure that this doesn’t appear on the first page. And I now have three Sections where I can put content. I’m going to use these three to illustrate some of the other content that can go into Headers and Footers. In fact, this content can be put pretty much anywhere in a document. First of all, Date and Time here in the Insert Group. We get a choice of Format which is governed by your language and locale. And we can check the box that says, “Update Automatically” if we want to, which will

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Update the Date and Time to the current Date and Time. I’m not going to check that at the moment. That’s what the Format of Date that I want. I’m going to click on OK and there I have my Date. In the middle, I’m going to look for another Quick Part. The Quick Part I’m going to look for now, I can choose another document Property. I’m going to choose the Author. And in the third one, I’m going to do something a little bit more clever. I’m going to put the Page Number in there, but I’m going to put in, in rather a clever way. I’m going to use Field as one of the Quick Parts and look at some of the available Fields. Some of the Fields are things we all ready know about, like Author, but some of them are not. So, for instance, this one is the Page Number. Now having put in a Page Number, and this is now Page 1 of my document, I’m now going to type the word “of” and I’m going to Insert another Quick Part, another Field, but instead of Page Number this time I’m going to use Num Pages, which is the number of pages in the whole document. So that now says 1 of 3. There are actually four sheets of paper but it doesn’t include the Cover Page. I could’ve put the word “Page” before that. So, in fact, in these boxes in the Header or Footer, you’re not restricted to putting one thing. We can put in composite statements where we’ve got Fields, Quick Parts, and so on. Pretty much achieve any effect we want. So let’s Close the Header and Footer Editing. Let’s look through our document. We can see the Header and Footer in place everywhere. We go back to the first page and there’s no sign of them. So, that’s a pretty good result. We finished dealing with Long Documents now. We’re going to move onto Technical Documents where we’ll also find some further features that are of general use to any sort of document that we prepare using Word 2010. See you then.

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Chapter 10 – Technical Documents Video: Line-numbering, Adding Bibliography & Index Toby: Hello again. In this chapter, we’re going to look at some of the features of Word 2010 that are particularly useful for Technical Documents. However, many of these features will be of general use as well. Let’s get started. We’re going to start with a very simple facility, Line Numbering. We can switch on Line Numbering for any document and it’s easy to do. Go to the Page Layout Tab, Line Numbers, click on the drop down. There are several options available. Continuous means that Lines are Numbered Continuously from the start to the finish, one onwards. Restart each page means that Line Numbers Restart at the beginning of each new page. Restart each Section means that the Line Numbers begin at one or other specified Start Number at the beginning of each Section. Suppress for current paragraph means that we can select one or more paragraphs and say that we don’t want those Numbered. And then we also have Line Numbering Options which brings out the Layout Tab on the Page Setup Dialog and under there Line Numbers gives us finer control. Start Number, Increment, Default to Incrementing by one. Certain academic circles it’s traditional to increment Line-numbers by 10. And then the Restart or Continuous options here as well. Note that this indicates that we’re talking about a Section, which will become apparent in a moment. So let’s choose Line-numbers Continuous and see what happens. Well it’s pretty straight forward; the Line-number has started at one, runs down through the document and stops at the end of the Section because it’s only been applied to the Section that the cursor was in.

If I wanted to apply it to another Section, like the Visa

Information Section which remember is in a separate Sub-document and there is an invisible Section break here, again, I could say Line Numbers Continuous and it carries on from where I left off. Line Numbering is useful and can even be mandatory in Technical Documents. But we’re going to switch it off for now. We’re now going to move on to look at putting a Bibliography into our document. A Bibliography is a list of books, articles, web pages, or other documents. Usually the items in the list are related to the content of our primary document; i.e. either one we’re working on. Let’s go back to Outline View. Position the cursor at the end of the Master Document, but not inside one of the Sub-document Sections and select the References Tab.

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Click on the drop down next to Bibliography and choose a Style of Bibliography. I’m going to go for the first one. At the moment there are no Sources in this document. When we’re dealing with a Bibliography, we can choose the appropriate Style, APA, Chicago, and so on. We’re going to stick with APA Format. Now it’s time to put some References into our Bibliography, so we’ll move onto that next. Let’s change back to Print Layout View. I’m going to Insert a Citation now in the body of my document. The Citation is to the Source of the information about the Suburbs of Sydney. So I place the cursor where I want the Citation to appear, click on References, Insert Citation at New Source. The Create Source Dialog appears, within that I can specify the type of Source, book, journal, report, website, etc. This is a book. The Author of the book is Paul Smitz. The Title of the book is Lonely Planet Australia; the year 2005; the Publisher Lonely Planet Publications. Click on OK and my Citation is now there. It says Smitz, 2005. If I now go to the end of my document, Bibliography still empty, but if I click on it there is a control here to update the Citations and Bibliography and there is my Reference, Smitz, P. (2005). Lonely Planet Australia. I can also Insert a Citation to an existing entry in the Bibliography. Manage Sources let’s me take References from a Master List and use them in my current document. I earlier on entered a Reference to a website, x-rates.com, which actually gives me exchange rates. I’m going to Copy that into my current list, Close that, and up here near the point where I entered the exchange rates, at the current time the exchange rate is, I’m going to say in there Insert Citation. Now when I do Insert Citation now, it lists the existing entries in the Bibliography. So there’s Paul Smitz that I entered just now and this one which is a Reference to a website and I can choose that one. Go back down to my Bibliography, click in again, click in Update, and I now have a Reference to the specific website where I got that exchange rate from. That’s about it on Bibliographies for the moment. We’re now going to look at another useful feature that we can add to a Technical Document, which is an Index. We’re now going to add an Index to our document. An Index is an ordered list of terms and it gives a Reference point, usually the Page Number of where the term appears within the document. We’re going to place the Index after the Bibliography and we’re going to put the Index entries in manually before we Insert the Index. So, let’s scroll through our document and choose a few terms to put in the Index. Well, there’s a good one to start with, Port Jackson. Go

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to the References Tab, Index Group, click on Mark Entry, Port Jackson, the Reference will be its current page, click on Mark. With some of the terms I put in the Index, I want them to be Referenced wherever they appear in the document, so here’s one of those terms, Sydneysiders, Mark Entry again, but this time I’m going to say Mark All which means we’ll indicate all places where that term is Referenced. Here’s another one, Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race, Mark Entry and there’s another one, Royal Botanic Gardens, Mark Entry. We’d normally Mark these terms as we develop the document. This one I’m going to do slightly differently. I’m going to put in an Index Entry for ETA, as before Mark. But for Electronic Travel Authority, I’m not going to give its own entry. I’m going to say Mark Entry, but instead of current page, I’m going to say Cross Reference and then See ETA. So let’s now go to the end of the document and Insert our Index. I’d normally put a Heading here, Index. Let’s just do Insert for now. I get a number of options, very similar to the Table of Contents Options. I can choose whether to have the numbers like this following on after the term or over to the right, Right Align Page Numbers using a Tab Leader and specifying the Formats that I’d like. How many Columns on the Index? I’m going to except a two Column Index. Click on OK and there we are. We can see Electronic Travel Authority, See ETA. Royal Botanic Gardens is page 2. And there are two References to Sydneysiders on 1 and 2. So that’s a very quick review of how to put an Index into a document.

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Video: Understanding Formatting Marks; Sections Features Toby: Welcome back. We’re really making progress with our document now. We have a nice Cover Page, a Table of Contents, some Body Text that includes References to a Bibliography. We have a couple of Sections of the document that are actually held in Sub-documents. We have our Bibliography at the end with a couple of entries in it and right at the end our new Index. We’re now going to look at a couple of very important features that we’ve only mentioned a little so far, but that are going to become increasingly essential as we move forward. One of these we can see by bringing up Backstage View, going to the Word Options Dialog and clicking the Display option. This is a page which allows us to change how document Content is displayed on the screen and when printed. And at the moment we’re going to be particularly interested in this Section which says, “Show All Formatting Marks.” We’re going to enable that and our document takes on a bit of a different appearance. You will see, for instance, here against Sydneysiders that we have something that’s appeared that says “XE Syndeysiders.” Now, if we read the document, normally we wouldn’t see that but that is actually a Hidden Code. Well, a normally Hidden Code that tells us that we have an Index entry there for that, similarly for Port Jackson we have an entry there. If I go a little bit further up the document, I see a very interesting Mark here which is Section Break Next Page. It’s often useful in a document to Insert Section Breaks. Mainly so that we can change the Formatting from one Section to another, but is also makes it easier to change Headers and Footers, and depending on the type of Section Break, for instance this one Next Page, it can force the next Section to start on a new page. If I go down the document to the Visa Information, which is the first of our Subdocuments, there’s a Section Break there Continuous. In fact, when you Insert a Sub-document in a Master Document in Word, Word automatically puts some Section Breaks in and sometimes it’s necessary to manually change those Section Breaks, or even remove them, but more of that later. We have a new page for a Bibliography and following that a new page for the Index. So, sometimes it’s very useful to be able to bring up to display those Sections and to Section Breaks, and to see all of the Coding in our document. Let’s switch that off again for now, so it’s Backstage View, Word Options, Display, Show all Formatting Marks, click OK, and they’ve gone again. But let’s now look at the question of Sections in a little bit more detail.

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A Section within a document is like a mini-document, not a separate Sub-document, but it has its own Margin Settings, its own Page Orientation.

So, for instance, one Section could be

Landscape and the following could be Portrait. It has its own Page Numbering and so on. It’s often useful, particularly with Long Documents, to be able to see which Section we’re in. So, for the balance of this part of the course, we’re going to go down to the Status Bar where we can currently see Page 4 of 7, number of words and so on, and we’re going to Customize this again. If you look near the top of Customize Status Bar, there is an option there to show which Section we’re on. So I’m going to enable that and now we can see the Section Number at the bottom as well. We’re currently in Section 3. If we scroll forward in the document, for instance here, we’re just after the Section Break that leads us into Table of Contents and so on. So we’re going to find that useful from now on. Let’s now take a look at some of the features of the Sections of our document and in what way those features affect the presentation of the document. The first page, our Cover Page, has no Header or Footer. If we click within it we can see its Section 1 and go into the Page Layout Tab we have Margins and check in on Margins, we can see that we have narrow Margins set. That was to accommodate this Picture of Sydney Opera House. Moving onto the second page, this is the Table of Contents page, click in there, we’re in Section 2. Margins in this are normal and let’s look at something else. Although this isn’t on the Page Layout page, this is on the Insert Page; let’s look at Page Numbers. For each Section of a document, we can specify how Page Numbers work. We can include a Chapter Number for a name like 1-1 and we can either continue Page Numbers from the previous Section or we can start again at a number of our choice. This one is starting Page Numbering at one, but to a large extent that doesn’t really matter because we don’t show the page Number on here anywhere anyway. Let’s move on to the next Section. This is now Section 3. This is where the Body of our document starts and as you can see we have the Header and Footer that we put on earlier and although it says here Page 3 of 8, that’s actually the number of sheets in the document rather than a number on this page. If we look at the Footer, we can see that the document thinks this is actually Page 1. Now, to see how that works, let’s go back into Insert Page Number again. We have Page Numbering starting at Page 1. This is actually the first Section in this document where we’re actually show the Page Numbers, in this case in the Footer.

Let’s move on from there to then this page, Visa

Information. Now Visa Information, Section 4, we have no Header or Footer. That’s because

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this is actually a Sub-document as you may recall. So let’s add a Header and Footer and let’s take a look at the Page Numbers. The handling of Page Numbers and Headers and Footers in an independent section of a document is something you’ll come across quite a bit. This Section of this document is actually a Sub-document. Let’s first of all Insert a Header. Now if we click on the Header Section there, we go into Edit. We can actually go into Edit Header without choosing one and we can basically say Link to Previous, which means that the Header of this Section, which is Section 4, will just basically Copy the contents of the previous Section 3 and that carries that through. We can do the same with the Footer. Down to here. We actually have a Go To Footer instruction and, again, we can say Link to Previous. Confirm with a Yes and we carry on from the previous. Now within this Section for Page Numbering, go to Insert Page Numbers, Format Page Numbers, and this time instead of Start at one or some other number, we say Continue from Previous Section. So, Section 4 is now setup to Copy the Header and Footer from the Previous Section 3, but 2 of 7 at the end of Section 3 goes into 3 of Section, 3 of 7 in Section 4 and so on. Now the next page is another Sub-document, this is where the Currency Section begins. We need to do the same operation on that Section, which I’ll do later. And here when we’re into Bibliography, we may well be back in a situation where we either want a different Header and Footer or no Header and Footer at all. But you should have the general idea now of how this works. So, let’s move on. Okay, we’ve done a lot on our document and it’s beginning to take good shape. When we finish working on a document, particularly a Long Technical Document, we’ll normally have a routine to follow at the end just to make sure that we’ve Updated everything that needs to Update and check that everything seems to be in place. On the References Tab, certain things we can do as a matter of course. For instance, I brought the Table of Contents into View, but it doesn’t need to be. I can click on Update Table and then either Update Page Numbers only or Update the entire Table. I’m going to Update the Entire Table. You may want to watch to see what happens to the Page Numbers. A few Updates there. Similarly without actually going to that part of the document we can do things like Update the Index. Having covered the structure of a Long or Technical Document and talked about Sections, Page Numbers, and so on, we’re now going to move to some of the other particular features for this sort of document.

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Video: Inserting Symbols, Equations, Auto-Text, Building Blocks Toby:

When we’re working with Technical Documents, we often need to Insert special

Symbols. And in this section, we’re going to have a look at some of the options that Word 2010 provides us with. On the Insert Tab at the right we have Insert Symbol. There’s a number of Standard Symbols, such as the Euro Symbol, Copyright and Trademark Symbols here, which we can Insert into a document simply by clicking them and selecting; that’s the Copyright Symbol, for instance. I could also Insert the Greek Capital Beta. Sometimes we want a rarer Symbol or one for a very specific purpose. If we click on the drop down on the Symbol button and click on More Symbol, we do have a very wide range of choices. Let’s have a quick look through some of those. The Symbols are divided into subsets. We choose a subset here; for instance, this is the Greek and Coptic Symbols subset. We could also look at Cyrillic Alphabet, Currency Symbols, and so on. When you’ve Inserted a Symbol, Word keeps track of the Symbols you’ve recently Inserted here on a recent Symbols list and you can refer easily back to a Symbol that perhaps you’ve been using quite a bit in a document. We also have two other useful features down here. One of them is the Auto-correct feature, which not only lets us specify some Autocorrect conditions that we’re going to look at later, but also gives us sequences of keys that we can press to achieve a particular effect. So, for example, if I want the Euro Symbol, I type round bracket-E-close round bracket. Let me just try that now in my document. Round bracket-Eclose round bracket and there is my Euro Symbol. That’s a nice easy one to do. It’s also possible to use and setup Shortcut Keys. So if there’s a particular Symbol that you want to use quite a bit, you can actually Create a Keyboard Shortcut to Insert that Symbol into your document.

We also have a range of Special Characters, things like that Trademark and

Copyright Symbols that I mentioned before and the Keyboard Shortcut for each of those. So again, Word 2010 offers us a good range of facilities. When we’re dealing with scientific or academic papers, we often need to be able to include mathematical equations in our documents. Word 2010 provides some good facilities for dealing with equations. If we select the Insert Tab again, look on the right, there’s Equation just above Symbol and the Equation drop down gives us access to a number of Standard Equations. Let’s choose the Binomial Theorem here and there’s the Equation in our document. When we’ve included an Equation in this way, it’s straightforward to Edit the Equation. So, for instance, here

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I could change the letter A to a B and we can even add Sections onto an Equation. We could put something on the end, for instance. If our requirement is for a Non-standard Equation, one that isn’t on the drop down there, we can actually put one in one piece at a time, which we’re going to look at in just a moment. But before we do, note that this is what’s called the Professional View of an Equation. Word also provides a Linear View which in the case of the Binomial Theorem gives us this view where the up arrow Symbols denote the exponentiation sign in Professional View. We’re going to Undo that Equation now and we’re going to actually build an Equation up ourselves. Back to the Insert Tab, Equation, and it says Insert New Equation. When we Insert an Equation, we can choose elements from here as a starting point. So, for instance, if I wanted a fraction I could choose fraction. It then gives me a range of available fractions. So here’s one with a numerator, a horizontal rule, and a denominator. And those two dotted boxes are basically where I can Insert the Characters that I need for my Equation. Now we’re not going to spend a lot of time looking at Equations now because it’s a topic in its own right, but as you can see, Word 2010 does provide some good facilities. It is worth noting that if you go on the Launcher there for Equation Options, you can see some of the things that you can do with Equations, apart from the ones we’ve just seen. So, for instance, there are some Autocorrect facilities whereby to get specific Symbols, for instance, you can type specific key sequences and there are some recognized functions. So, for instance, for some of the trigometric functions like arccosine. You can use the term arccos and Word will not Capitalize that, it will know that it’s a mathematical function and it won’t deal with it as though it’s a normal word. So, that’s it on the mathematical functions now.

Let’s look again at some of the other

requirements for Inserting into Technical Documents. Another feature of Word 2010 that can be useful in all kinds of document and not just Technical Documents is Auto-Text. If I have a particular term, let’s say my term is Sydney Opera House that I use a lot in a document I can set it up as Auto-Text. Select the Text, go to the Insert Tab, choose Quick Parts, select on Auto-Text, and Save Selection to Auto-Text Gallery. I’ll give it a name of SOH; Saves my Auto-Text term with a name of SOH into the Auto-Text Gallery. The next time I want to Insert the term, if I click on Insert Quick Parts, Auto-Text, there it is. I don’t have to type it again. Those of you who have used earlier versions of Word will know that AutoText has been around for a while. In fact, from Word 2007 onwards, Auto-Text was actually built up into a feature called Building Blocks and this is maintained in Word 2010. When we do

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Insert Quick Parts, we can actually go to the Building Blocks Organizer which gives us a whole range of pre-typed, pre-prepared content. So, for instance, particular types of Footers; particular types of Headers are in this Gallery. We have a Galleries, Categories, and so on. We can sort by Gallery. So we have different types of Cover Page that we can quickly Insert and here we have, in fact, some Equations we can quickly Insert. There’s the Fourier Series. So, Building Blocks can be Inserted at all kinds of places and you can add your own Building Blocks, including AutoText to the Gallery. This gives us a very straightforward way of Inserting into a document terms, Equations, Cover Pages, and so on that we might use a lot. There is another important point to note about Building Blocks. Although we can use the Building Block approach to Insert Static Text such as Sydney Opera House, in fact we can use it to Insert a structure in which we can subsequently Insert whatever Text we need. Let’s look at an example. If we click on Insert, Quick Parts, Building Blocks Organizer again, I move down say to here, Text Box. If we do an Insert of this Building Block, we have a Building Block on the page which is a Shaped, Sized, and Colored Box, but the Text in it is Text that we can enter ourselves after we’ve Inserted the Building Block. So the content of a Building Block is not necessarily Static Content.

It can actually be dynamic content that we subsequently add

ourselves. That’s it for the moment on Building Blocks, Auto-Text, and so on. We’re coming onto the last section on Technical Documents next and in this we’re going to look at a couple more features that we might find in Technical Documents in particular, but also ways of finding our way around Technical Documents and Long Documents in general.

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Video: Inserting Footnotes, Bookmarks, Cross-references Toby: Hello again. Footnotes are used to provide additional information that is inappropriate for the body of our Text and to document References for information or quotes presented in the Body of the document. I’m going to Insert a Footnote here about Sydney Harbor. I’m going to go to the Section where it says, “It is not safe to get into the water at all, including the Harbor itself.” Go to the References Tab, click on Insert Footnote and what happens is a small superior number is put in here, in fact it’s our first Footnote so it’s number one and then the cursor is placed at the bottom of that page for me to type in the note. “Recently, a 35-year-old man paddling a kayak had a narrow escape from a Great White Shark.” And that’s it. That’s as easy as it is to put a Footnote into a document. End Notes serve the same purpose but End Notes when you Insert them all appear together at the end of the document in an End Notes Section. Now for another useful feature of Word 2010, in fact, this is a feature of Word that’s been around for a long time. We can take any point in our document, let’s choose this Header, Visa Information, and we can Insert a Bookmark. We give the Bookmark a name, one word which we’ll call “VisaInfo”. Add that and what that does is to place an invisible Marker on the piece of Text that we’ve just Bookmarked and if we’re elsewhere in the document, particularly a long way away in a Long Document, wherever we happen to be. If we click on Bookmark again, it gives us a list of the available Bookmarks. Well we only have one at the moment. Click on Go To and we go straight to that Bookmark, which can be extremely useful way of finding your way around a Long Document. One last additional feature is the Cross-reference. Cross-references direct the reader to related information elsewhere in our document. These Cross-references can refer to Figures, Headings, whole Sections or Chapters, and the Cross-references give the reader a useful way of linking to another part of the document with relevant information. reference, although it’s a quite a powerful facility.

It’s very easy to Insert a Cross-

Let’s suppose that within my Sydney

document I want to talk about great swimming and so on, great surfing here in this third paragraph. I want to refer them to the Section on Water. So let’s put the cursor in here. I’m going to Insert a Cross-reference now to the Heading, Headed Section on Water. On the References Tab click on Cross-reference and we have a number of ways of referring to a Cross-

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reference Section. We can point at a whole Heading. We can point at a specific Bookmark or Footnote, an End Note, an Equation, a Figure, all sorts of things. Let’s go for a Heading. The Reference we want to put in the Heading is the Heading Text itself, which in this case will be Water. And we choose the Heading we want. So, there’s the one we want, Water, and Insert a Cross-Reference. Let’s see what happens. Close the box. Now, as we can see, it’s just got the word Water there, which is actually a Cross-Reference. We can actually Hyperlink to it by Control and click and that takes us to the relevant point in the document. The chances are that in reality we’d Format that something like this, we would say, “See Water,” and again, the Hyperlinking takes us straight to that Section. It’s a very useful feature. We’re now going to return to one of the features we looked at earlier, which is the Navigation Pane. You may recall that in order to view the Navigation Pane we go to the View Menu, click the check box for Navigation Pane, and it appears here on the left; although, of course, we can Move it around. You probably remember that the third Tab gives us the Find and Replace facility that we used earlier. The middle Tab gives us the little thumb nails of each page, which is quite a convenient way of moving around a Long Document. The first Tab was one we only really briefly looked at before because we didn’t really have a substantial document. Now we’ve got a document with several Headings in it and as you can see, it gives us an extremely easy way of jumping Introduction, Bibliography, and so on. So that gives you a good idea of how useful the Navigation Pane can be on a Long Document. Finally, in this section, we’re going to look at some Tools that are available to help us to find specific Objects in a Long Document. One of the Tools is the Go To facility. If I go to the Home Tab, click on Find, a drop down next to Find has a Find and a Go To. If I click on Go To, it lets me choose a type of Object, so for instance, a Bookmark. We’ve already seen that at work, go to that Bookmark. It’s the only Bookmark we have. Footnotes, go to the next Footnote. If there isn’t one, go to previous Footnote. It’s gone to the previous Footnote. So, we can actually cycle through all of our Footnotes, all of our Bookmarks, Tables, and so on, go to the next Table. That works fine with this facility. It’s a very convenient way of finding a way around a Long Document. But there’s also a well hidden and little known about facility which does pretty much the same job in a very neat kind of way. And that’s this little Browse Tool Bar that’s just down here at the bottom of the right hand end cursor slider. Select Browse Object,

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click on that and you get a little mini Tool Bar. And that lets you step through Headings, Graphics, Tables, Fields, End Notes, Footnotes, Comments, Sections, and so on. Let’s choose Headings and just see what happens. Browse by Heading. Select Headings, now there’s a double arrow above, double arrow below, go to that one, that gives us the next Heading. Go to that one, we’re out of Headings, so we can go back through the document and it takes us Heading by Heading through the whole document. It’s a very easy way of Browsing a document if you know the Heading you’re looking for, that’s the way to find it. Quite a range of facilities there as well if I wanted to say Browse by Table, there is only one Table, it goes straight to it. So that’s the end of our review of Long Documents and Technical Documents for now. We’re going to return to one or two of these points later on, but for the moment it’s time to move on to looking at doing a Mail Merge.

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Chapter 11 – Mail Merge Video: Setting up Mail Merge Using Wizard Toby: Welcome back. In this chapter we’re going to look at using Mail Merge in Word 2010. Mail Merge can be used for many types of situation, both in business and in your personal correspondence. For example, if you want to use Mail Merge for your business, it may be to send a standard letter to a large number of clients. At home, you may be wanting to send a standard greeting to all of your friends at Christmas, for example. Whatever the purpose of the Mail Merge, the general approach is the same, and Word 2010 provides some excellent facilities. We’re going to start by looking at a very simple Mail Merge using the Mail Merge Wizard. And in order to do that, we’ll first of all going to have to provide some Data. As we’ll see later on, the Data for a Mail Merge can be provided in a number of different ways. For the purposes of our first Mail Merge, we’re going to use some Data I prepared using Microsoft Excel and it’s in simple tabular form. If I go to the Microsoft Excel Backstage View, click on Open, and I should find here, there we are, my Mail Merge Data. The Data comprises half a dozen names and addresses of people that I know and at the top of the Columns are what I’m going to refer to as the Field Name. So, for instance, the first Column in my Spreadsheet has the Salutation, then the given name of each person, the family name, the first line of their address, and so on. So that’s the Data that I’m going to use in my first Mail Merge. Now I’m back in Word 2010 again and to start the Mail Merge I go to the Mailings Tab on the Ribbon and most of the buttons there are grayed out for a reason that will become apparent in a little while. But if I click on Start Mail Merge, I’m presented with a number of options. I can Mail Merge Letters, e-mail messages, envelopes, and so on. But I’m going to start with a stepby-step Mail Merge Wizard because this will give you a pretty good idea of how Mail Merge works in general. So let’s start the Wizard. First of all, our document, Blank Document appears here and on the right we have the Mail Merge Task Pane. And the Wizard takes us through the steps of a Mail Merge and you can see the numbered steps at the bottom. So, we’re ready to start with Step 1, which is Starting the Document. The first thing we do while we’re still on Step 1 is to choose the sort of document we’re going to Create and we’re going to start with a Letter.

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Having chosen Letter, I click on Next and I’m ready to start the next stage. Select Starting Document. How do you want to setup your Letter? You can use the current document, which is empty. Start from a Template or start from an existing document. We’ll be trying all of these later, but for the moment let’s go for Start from a Template and then we’re asked to select a Template. We’ve seen these Templates before. Let’s click on Letters and let’s go for Urban Letter. Having selected the Urban Letter, we’re going to need to make some changes to it in order to perform our Mail Merge. But before we do, we need to select the recipients for our Mail Merge, which is the next step down here. Click on there. We’re given the options for selecting the recipients of our Mail Merge Letter. We can use an existing list, select from our Outlook Contacts, or type in a new list. We’ve chosen to use an existing list, it’s the list we looked at a little while ago. We’re going to Browse for that. Clicking here brings up the Select Data Source Dialog where we have two major options: Connect to New Data Source and NewSQLServerConnection. We’re going to select a New Data Source. We’re given Dialog there, we can select on documents. We know where we left our invitation, Mail Merge names. There they are. Click on Open. It’s Sheet 1 in the Excel Spreadsheet, so click on OK. And just to confirm, the Mail Merge Wizard shows us our six names. So there we are, Tina Androtti, Ahmed Chalama, and so on. So, they’re the right people. Word has now checked our recipient list and is happy with it and has actually put together some useful blocks of information that we’re going to be able to use in our Mail Merge. And I’ll come back to those in a moment. First of all, I’m going to make a couple of changes to the Letter before we start the Merge itself. I’m going to Delete those lines of address. I’m going to put my own fictitious address in there. I’m going to pick the Date, which is going to be 30th of June and now I have two important parts of this Letter, because these are the two parts where the Mail Merge is going to happen. The first part covers the name and address of each recipient. So I’m going to Delete the contents of the Template from there and make a little space. And then I’m going to use one of the Blocks that Word has prepared for me, the Address Block. Word has actually Previewing what that will look like for one of my recipients here. And I’m actually quite happy with that. But if I wanted to change something, so for instance, if I wanted to say, “Mrs. Tina Androtti,” it would give me a choice here from all the available formats of the

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recipient’s name. I’m quite happy with this format so I’m going to stick with that. Down here, the Salutation, again, I’m going to Delete what’s there in the Template, make a little space. Here I’m going to use the other Block that Word has prepared, which is the Greeting Line here. Again, I get a Preview. There’s a choice “Dear”, I could say “To”, but I’ll stick with Dear. Format of the name; I’m quite happy with that again. And then I can follow it with a comma, or a colon, or with nothing. Stick with the comma. I can say, “Dear Sir or Madam” instead where I don’t have a known recipient name. So let’s click with that and there we are; we’re ready to Preview our Letters. So, that’s it. We click on Preview your Letters. We can see the first Letter here, the one to Tina Androtti, name and address, Dear Tina Androtti, and so on. On the Mail Merge Task Pane on the right, there’s a pair of controls to step me through the Letters. That’s the one to Ahmed Chalama. And also I have the option to make changes. I can exclude a particular recipient or Edit the recipient list. Finally, to complete the Merge, click once more here and I can either Merge to the Printer which will Print all of the Letters that are currently in the set to my designated Printer or I can Edit individual Letters. It will let me go to each individual Letter and perhaps make a personal change for that person. So, we’ve seen a very simple Mail Merge using the Wizard from beginning to end. In the following section, we’re going to start to look at each of those steps in more detail. See you then.

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Video: Manual Mail Merge Set-up Toby: Hello again. We’re now going to look at Mail Merge in a little more detail. We produced our set of Letters for the six people and we are now going to produce Labels to go on the envelopes to send those six Letters. We’re going to use the Mail Merge facility in Word manually this time rather than the Wizard. We do need to send the Letters to the same six people, but we’re going to use a different Source for those six names and addresses. When we use the Wizard, we got the names and addresses from an Excel Worksheet. You may not use Excel or you may have a different Database System. Most Database Systems will produce Data in .csv format. CSV stands for Comma Separated Values. And I’ve produced a .csv file with those six names and addresses in it. It’s here and I’m currently looking at it in Microsoft Notepad. If you use a different Database System, then provided you can Export Data into a .csv file you’ll be able to use Mail Merge in just the way we’re going to use it here. Our first line has the Field Name, Salutation, given name, family name, and so on. The other lines are the names and addresses of the six people. So let’s Close that down and begin our Mail Merge. To begin the Mail Merge, we go to the Mailings Tab and then go to Select Recipients. We can type in a new list of course. We can use an existing list. Well we’ve already seen our .csv file which we’re going to use. So go to the right Folder, find that File, and if I want to confirm that I’ve got the right recipients, as before I can look at the recipient list and there they are. There’s the list of my six people with all the details of each. Now start the Mail Merge. I’m going to produce a set of Labels, so click on Labels. I can specify the type of Printer that I’m going to use; a Continuous Feed Printer or a Page Printer. Nowadays most people use Page Printers, but some Continuous Feed Printers are still in use. Probably you’ll be using a Page Printer and you have a whole range of Label Vendors. Probably every Label Vendor you’re likely to come across and you can choose from their different makes, models, serial numbers of Labels. We’re going to be using Avery Labels, Avery A4/A5 Labels and the Label Code we’re going to use is this one when I find it, 6092. OK and Word Draws empty Labels on the screen for us; just the right size. They’ll be stuck on some envelopes. When we’ve located the Labels that we want we can then start to enter the details that are going to go onto each Label.

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Let’s start to Insert the Merge Fields. Use the Insert Merge Field button. Word has already looked at our .csv file and knows the names of the Fields that we want to Insert. So I can Select them by name. We start with Salutation, then I’m going to type a space, then the given name, another space, then the family name, and so on. We carry on with Address Line 1, City, State, and finally zip. Then we press Update Labels and that fills the same pattern in on every Label on the sheet. We’re now ready to actually Merge with our Data. Okay, having filled our Labels with the correct Fields, we can now Preview the results using the Preview Results button. We can now see that each of our six recipients has a Label on the sheet. Only those six, the Labels that are not needed have no content printed on them at all. Having done the Merge itself or Previewed the Merge itself I can now finish it to produce the Labels. The options I have are that I can produce individual documents which are Editable for each sheet or I can Print the Labels directly to my Printer. Clearly, if I was doing a Mail Merge to maybe hundreds of people, I would be producing a lot of sheets of Labels here, but I could start that print off directly from here. There is an e-mail option here, but we’re going to come back to that in a little while. Having prepared the Letters for each of our six recipients and the Labels to go on the envelopes, we’re now going to send to each of them a short e-mail to confirm that we have written to them. Instead of using the Excel Worksheet or the .csv file for the recipient details, we’re going to get the details from Outlook. Back to Select Recipients, the third option is to Select from Outlook Contacts. Click on that. I only have seven contacts in my Outlook Data File, click OK, and there are the seven people. The first six that we’ve written the Letters to and one other person called Sarah. Now you will notice with this list that because it’s not used either the Excel Worksheet or the .csv file, the Headings are different. They’re the Headings from Outlook and when we use contact details from Outlook, the Heading names, Field names will be the ones from Outlook. That’s a very important point to be careful of. To exclude Sarah from this Merged e-mail I uncheck the box here, click on OK. Just before I click OK, what was first name is now first, family name is now last, and so on. Start Mail Merge. I’m going to do E-mail Messages, and I can start to type my E-mail Message. Insert Merge Field now gives me a list of Outlook Merge Fields. So I’m going to put first in there. I’m going to type a brief message and there we are. And I can Preview the results. Artur, Sergio, step through them, and so on. So,

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that is an E-mail Merge. That’s it on Mail Merging for the moment. We’ll return to one or two of these topics later on, but you’ve seen all of the most important points now.

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Chapter 12 – Proofing & Printing Video: Spelling/Grammar Check Toby: Welcome back. In this chapter, we’re going to look at Proofing and Printing a document. After you’ve pretty much finalized your document there are some steps you need to carry out prior to Printing it. This process is generally referred to as Proofing. This was originally an abbreviation of the Proof Reading, but it now covers all kinds of activities, including spell checking, translation, using multiple languages, and so on. Let’s look at some of the facilities that Word 2010 offers us. We’re now going to perform one of the most important Proofing operations that should be part of your regular routine when you’re working with Word 2010.

It’s the Spell Check. More

specifically it’s called the Spelling and Grammar Check and in order to perform this on our Enjoying Sydney document I click on Review, Spelling and Grammar. Because this is a Master Document with Sub-documents, Word asked me if I want to Open the Sub-documents so that they will be Spell Checked as well. I say Yes. And then it starts the Spell Check which is controlled using the Spelling and Grammar Dialog. The first issue that it’s flagged, the issues are basically here, is a Subject/Verb agreement and where it says here “but with the thunderous waves also providing great surfing sea water,” Word thinks that we have a Grammatical problem. We’ve got Check Grammar Marked. With that sentence or that end of a sentence, we actually know that we put in a Cross-reference there and although grammatically it may not be correct, the effect if exactly what we want so we can instruct Word to Ignore that Rule on this occasion. To get Word to Ignore a Rule once, we click on Ignore Once. Next it flags one of the most common problems we’re going to come across which is the Spelling Error. Here it says Not in Dictionary. It’s identified the word marked in red. Clearly we know what the problem is there; we’ve misspelled the word “Opera.” It presents some alternative words that might be the word we meant. Opera the first one is that one. We just click on Change to correct it. There’s another option here, which is Change All. Some people have a tendency to change one, misspell one particular word over and over again, if you think in a particular document you may have misspelled something several times, you can click on Change All and it will correct all occurrences of that spelling mistake. I think I’ve only done that wrong once in this document so

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I’m just going to click on Change. Not in Dictionary again, another Spelling Mistake. You can see what that one is, misspelling of the word “Eastern.” Word has only proposed one alternative there, which is in fact the correct one. So, again, click on Change. Now we have another Grammar issue, “which typically costs 105 Australian dollars and can have a duration of 3, 6, or 12 months.” Word believes there is a problem with number agreement here. We have a singular noun duration and numbers with 3, 6, and 12 in them. So, in this case, Word is wrong. That sentence is grammatically quite correct. There are some Grammar Rules which Word does struggle with and number agreement is one of them. So I’m going to tell it to Ignore that Rule. When it’s finished checking it gives me a Confirmation Information Dialog at the end and I click on OK. My Spell Check is now complete. Whilst we were running the Spelling and Grammar Check, Word was applying a number of different rules and we can control the rules that Word applies both in Spell Checking and Grammar Checking using Word Options. Go to Backstage View, click on Options, and click on Proofing. We have a Group of Options here. This Group relates to Spell Checking in Microsoft Office Programs in general including, for example, Excel. This Group applies to Word alone. And then we have some Auto-Correct options here. Let’s start with this Group, the Microsoft Office Program General Rules. We can check this check box and tell Office in general to ignore words that are all upper case; so words with only upper case characters. We can instruct Word to ignore words that contain numbers and so on. We can instruct it to flag cases of what it believes are repeated words. So there’s quite a fine level of control there. Within Word we can ask Word to check our Spelling as we type, mark Grammar errors as we type, and check Grammar with Spelling. If I uncheck this box, next time I do a Spell Check, it will not Grammar Check as well. So there’s quite a few options there. Let’s try some of this Spelling as you type and Grammar errors as you type, and see what happens. Let’s now see some of those Spelling and Grammar options in practice. I’ve Created a New Document. I’m going to increase the Size of the Font to make it easier to see what happens as I type. I’m going to type some Spelling mistakes and Grammar mistakes. We’ll start with this one. If I look at the first one, the word is Underlined; clearly there’s a Spelling mistake there. Word does not automatically correct a capitalized letter like this, a proper name. But if I right click on the word it offers me some alternatives to correct it and there is one, Opera. Now

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clearly the word “dog” isn’t misspelled, but clearly word thinks there’s a problem with it and it is a number agreement and it is “seven dog.” If I right click it offers me the correction, dogs. Now let’s see Word correct a normal word as we type. The word “well” I put three L’s in, it corrected it as two. Let’s try something again. I’m going to misspell the word “want.” It corrects it automatically. Before we move on to some of the other aspects of Proofing, let’s look at one or two of the other important aspects of Spelling Checking and Grammar Checking. Back into Backstage View, Options, Proofing. In the Microsoft Office Spelling section that we looked at before, we have these Standard Settings. For instance, Ignore words in upper case, Ignore words that contain numbers, Ignore internet and file addresses. We also have this very important feature here which is the Custom Dictionary. When we’re Spell Checking a document, we generally have our Custom Dictionary enabled and any words that we add to that, which the general word dictionary didn’t have before, are then checked by Word if it sees that word again; it doesn’t flag it as a problem. Sometimes when we’re dealing with a particular new subject or specialist subject, we may want to add a Dictionary with a whole range of unusual terms in it. Well we can add a Dictionary using this facility. We also briefly before looked at the Auto-Correct options where for instance, we have ways of typing a Euro Symbol with open round brackets-E-close round brackets and so on. And there’s a range of those special character sequences that we can use as well as some corrections for standard typing errors; for instance, a very common typing error to initial capitals, which Word can automatically correct. We can also ask Word to Capitalize the first letters of sentences or Capitalize names of days. That’s one we saw before. So, when you’re working on Word documents yourself, don’t forget all these options within Proofing on the Word Options, they can give you a very fine level of control on how Word helps you with your documents.

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Video: Using Thesaurus, Research Option, Translate; Printing Document Toby: We’re now going to look at some of the other really useful facilities in Word that are particularly handy when it comes to Preparation and Proofing of a document. If we return to the Review Tab, we have a group of functions here related to Research. Let’s take a quick look at one or two of those. Within the body of our Sydney document, suppose that we’d like to use an alternative term for one of the words or phrases that we already have. If we click on Thesaurus, it brings up the Research Task Pane. The Thesaurus actually with my language and if I hold the Alt key down and click on a word, “famous” for instance, the word is Copied into this Search For box. Within the main window within the Research Task Pane, I’m then given a number of alternative words for famous: well-known, famed, celebrated, renowned, and so on. So if we’re writing a Long Document that can be a really useful feature for finding that word that we can’t quite remember. Another very interesting aspect of this is that we can actually use this facility to do Research. So, for instance, if I were to choose, hold the Alt key down again, press the term Hobart. There are no alternatives to the word Hobart in the Thesaurus, but we may want to do some Research on Hobart. So, we’ve got a choice of Reference Books or Research Sites. Click on Research Sites, see what we can find about Hobart. We are, of course, online and in a few moments we get a response back. And there we have some links to Hobart, for instance a Wikipedia link to Hobart. Another very useful feature which has been significantly improved in Word 2007 and Word 2010 is the Translation facility. If I select a one paragraph like that and click on Translate, I have a number of options. I can Translate the whole document, I can Translate the Selected Text or I can use the Mini-Translator where I point to a word or select a phrase to do a quick Translation. I can choose Translation Language. I’ve got English to, and a whole range of languages. Let’s choose French and let us Translate the Selected Text. What happens is the Research Task Pane appears again, connection is made online, and the Translation into French is made. We have an option here to Translate the whole document, but if we just want the paragraph that we’ve just selected, click on Insert, and there we are. We have our paragraph Translated into French. The quality of Translated Text has improved considerably in recent times, but I think that a lot of native speakers would still have some issues with the results of automated Translation. But it’s still a very useful facility.

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Now that we’ve seen how to use some of the facilities on the Review Tab including Research, Thesaurus, and Translate and we already know now how to Spell and Grammar Check our document, we’re at the point where we will need to know how to Print the document out. And that’s what we’re going to look at next. Before we do, just bear in mind that you’ll probably have a different Printer in various situations where you’re using Word and although the Printer may have some different features, a lot of the features of Printers are quite common or similar nowadays. So, although you may not see exactly what we’re going to see in the next section, it should be pretty similar. So, to Print our document we need to go to Backstage View, click on Print, and we have this Dialog. Let’s start with Page Setup, which brings up the Page Setup Dialog that we’ve seen many times before. By now, you should have Margins, Paper, and Layout all sorted out. If you haven’t, there’s a chance here to change Format, to change Margin Sizes, to Select Paper Size; this is set in both cases to the Default Size. There may be selections for your particular Printer in terms of the trays that are available for holding the paper. You may have Headed Paper or Colored Paper and so on. It’s impossible to generalize about these things, so you may need to look at what the Local Setup is. And finally on the Layout Tab, we have information about Headers, Footers, and so on. So, pretty much we’ve covered all of the topics in there that we can, now we need to move on to the actual Printing itself. Now we come to the point that we’re actually going to Print the document. First choice to make is how many Copies to Print. Up here I can choose the Number of Copies. On this occasion I’m just going to Print one. I can choose my Printer. In many cases, there will only be one physical Printer. I only actually have one physical Printer attached to this machine. But there may be other options, such as Printing to a Fax, Printing to a piece of software such as Microsoft .xps, or to another application like Microsoft One Note 2010, as I have here. We then also have a choice of Printing All Pages, just the Current Page, a Custom Range of Pages, and we can do things like Print the Odd Pages, Print the Even Pages, which is quite useful if we want to do Double-sided Printing. And as we’ll see later, we have options for Printing Mark-up. Mark-up is something we haven’t covered yet, but we’ll be covering that quite soon, so we’ll come back to that at that point. We can ask whether we want Collated. So if we’re Printing more than one set, do we want the Printing to go Page 1, 2, 3, Page 1, 2, 3, Page 1, 2, 3 or do we want all the Page 1’s then all the Page 2’s, then all the Page 3’s? We can decide on Portrait or Landscape Orientation. Generally speaking when we Print a document from Word, Word and the Printer discuss this and

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decide on the correct Orientation. But sometimes if you need to force Orientation, you may need to use this option. Paper Size is very often dictated by the Printer. My Printer pretty much only takes A4. I can vary it a little bit, but I certainly can’t do Legal and Letter in it. For most people, A4 tends to be the Default. I can choose my Margins. This particular page has Narrow Margins set, but I know that as it goes through the documents, the Margins will vary. Again, Word and the Printer will discuss that and sort it out between them. And finally, Eight Pages per Sheet I’ve got here. Normally I’d have One Page per Sheet, but there is an option which will automatically make Word squeeze several pages onto a sheet. This can be quite useful for Proofreading the document on paper. I’m going back to One Page per Sheet. And when I’ve made all of my selections, I just Print the Print button. Just one last point on Printing before we move on, depending on the Printer that you are using for Printing your Word documents, you may have an additional Dialog here with some very useful settings in it. This is the Printer Properties control and this brings up a Dialog which is dependent on the Printer that you’re using. This will include things such as Finishing Quality Information, Color Resolution, Print Quality Information, and so on. And it may well be, depending on how sophisticated your Printer is, that you may be able to either improve quality, particularly on DTP type documents or perhaps choose a more economical setting if you’re Printing a lot of documents which can be Printed low-quality there perhaps just for Proofing. So, it’s useful getting familiar with the equivalent Dialog for your Printer.

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Chapter 13 – Publishing to Web Video: Publishing & Accessing Word Documents on Web Toby: Welcome back. In this chapter, we’re going to look at Publishing and Accessing Word Documents on the Web. You can place an existing Word Document on the Web for others to use. However, it must first be represented in what’s called .html format. HTML stands for Hypertext Mark-up Language. It’s a simple coding system and all of the popular web browsers use that coding system. When we Save a document, we have two alternatives and we’re going to look at both of them now. First of all, I’ve Opened our Sydney document and I’ve removed the Cover Page and we’re actually going to Format the rest of it as .html. Before we Save our document in .html format, let’s take a look at what it would look like as a web page. You may remember that one of the View options we have, we’re currently in Print Layout View, we have Full Reader View, and we have this View which is the Web Layout View. This shows us pretty much how this document will look in a browser. See how the Contents Page has changed and also if I scroll to the end of the document, you’ll notice that we still have the Bibliography and Index. The Bibliography and Index quite interesting on web pages because they can still be quite useful, but sometimes people elect not to use them. We’ll come back to those in a moment. Let’s stick with what we’ve got here and let’s Save this as a web page. There are two ways of doing this Save. I’m going to start with the more conventional one. Open Backstage View, Save As, and in the Save As type we very often use Word document, on this occasion we’re going to use this option, Web Page. I’ve actually created a Folder to work in. I’ve called it My Sydney Web. So that’s going to be our location and we have an opportunity when we Save as an .html file to change the Title of our page. It’s currently Enjoying Sydney. Let’s stick with Enjoying Sydney and click on Save. When I’m Saving, if I’m working with a Master Document as I am now with Sub-documents, Word asks me, Do you want to Open the Sub-documents before continuing? I do. And it further asks me, Word will automatically Save the Sub-documents to New Files in the same File Format as the Master Document. So my Subdocuments are going to be part of this Save as well. I’ll click OK to that as well. So there we are. My Files are now Saved. Let’s bring up Windows Explorer and go to Documents. Go to

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my main document, which is still Open here which is Enjoying Sydney.htm. The one with the squiggle at the front is the working copy which I mentioned to you before and it also automatically creates a Folder, in this case, called Enjoying Sydney_Files. So if I look in Enjoying Sydney Files, I have a number of Files that Word automatically creates when we Save a document in .html format. I’m not going to go into what all of these mean now. One or two of them we’ll perhaps return to later. Important thing to notice is that this whole structure of Files is created. So let’s go back to My Sydney Web, the Folder we’re working in and we can see our .html file with an .htm extension and this Folder that has the Files in it. That’s going to be very important in just a moment. So, back at our document; we’re Saved in .html format, I’m now going to Close the document and Save the changes. I’m now going to look at the results of all that hard work in an Internet browser. I’m going to use Internet Explorer. So, let me just switch to that, click on File, Open, Browse. That takes me to My Documents Library. I can scroll down to My Sydney Web and I can Open Enjoying Sydney.htm. Click on OK and the work that I’ve done totally in Word so far looks absolutely fine in a web browser. Clearly there’s no graphics so it doesn’t look like a particularly exciting document at the moment, but we know how to fix that. One of the more interesting things is the Contents Page because obviously we’ve lost the Page Numbers, but they’ve been replaced by these Hyperlinks. The Hyperlinks were there before in the Word document. They’re more visible and more prominent when we look at the document in a browser. So, for instance, if I click on Attractions, I go straight to that point on the page. So, there we are, we’ve seen that we can Save a document in .html format and the document is then fully usable as a web page and we could actually include it in a website. We’re now going to look at that second main way of Saving our document as a web page. I’ve Re-opened Enjoying Sydney and removed the Cover Page again. I’m going to do File, Save As, just the same as before, and the option that I’m going to choose this time as the Save As type is this one which is a Single File Web Page, which you normally refer to as an .mht file. The difference between this and the Format we just Saved was that the whole content, everything we need to know about the page is Saved in a Single File. Now before you do this, just bear in mind that the Single File Web Page Format has only been supported since around Internet Explorer Version 4 onwards. So, if somebody’s using a very old Internet Browser, they probably won’t

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be able to cope with this Format, but the vast majority of browsers can deal with it and it’s a very good method because you get everything in one File. You don’t have that Sub-folder we looked at with all those little Files in it. So I’m going to choose that Format. Other than that it’s pretty much the same. The File Extension we have is .mht. We can change the Title. I’m actually going to Save this in my Top Level Directory. I’m not going to go into my Sub-directory, click on Save. It’ll ask me the same questions that it asked me before about the Sub-documents and there we are. I’ve now got it in .mht format. Let’s Close that. Now that we’ve seen how to Save our Word documents as .html pages and we’ve seen that we can Open those .html pages in a browser, in our case Internet Explorer, we can turn the question on its head and say, Can we actually look at other people’s .html pages in Word? And the answer is, yes we can. And that’s what we’re going to do next. If we click on File, Open in Backstage View, on the drop down for the File Type which currently says All Word Documents. If we click, there is an option that says All Web Pages and this will, in a specific Folder, show us the .htm’s, .html’s, .mht’s, and so on. In this particular Folder I’m looking at, this is actually a structure from a large Australian website and I’m going to choose one of the pages, this is actually an .mht page, so it should be self-contained. Double click to Open and I’m now looking at a web page from an Australian website. Not only am I looking at it, which of course I could do with Internet Explorer, but it is now a Word document. I can not only Edit it, but I could actually Save it back to my own hard drive as a Word document. Easy as that. I should, of course, point out something that should be apparent to you anyway, which is of course that I couldn’t change somebody else’s Word document, like this, change somebody else’s website, which was in use because they would have protection on the website that would stop me changing it. But I can certainly download a page, Edit it, Save it with a new name perhaps, and then use that material myself, subject to Copyright rules of course. So, that’s it for our first look at .html pages, Saving our documents as web pages, accessing web pages, and so on.

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Chapter 14 – Protecting Documents & Computer Video: Using Document Inspector, Password Protect, Editing Restrictions Toby: Welcome back. In this chapter, we’re going to look at Protection of our documents and in fact of our computer while we’re using Word 2010. The range of facilities in Word now is much broader and deeper than it has ever been before and it can seem quite complicated to somebody who’s new to these sorts of topics. So, we’re going to break it down into two or three main points and we’re going to start with what’s called the Trust Center. If we go to Backstage View, Open the Word Options Dialog, and click on the bottom entry there, Trust Center, it takes us to an area which is described as Help keep your documents safe and your computer secure and healthy. Much of this relates to things like the Microsoft Word Privacy statement which we’re not going to look at here, but down in this corner Trust Center Settings takes us to the Settings for our computer. One of the main problems with a computer in general nowadays, but certainly with using Word, is that there are various ways that we can get viruses onto the system. And one of the ways is by the use of Active X Controls, which you may or may not have heard of, by Macros and so on. And we can actually change the Settings here for these sorts of roads into our computer system. For instance, if I click on Macro Settings for this computer, it’s set as Disable all Macros with notification. That means that it won’t allow Macros to run, but it will tell me that it’s disabled a Macro. I could change this to the most extreme setting in the other direction, Enable all Macros; not recommended, potentially dangerous Code can run. Sometimes I may need to do that in order to run a Macro that I want to run, but that’s generally a pretty dangerous Setting. The other Settings here are all important. For instance, Trusted Publishers, my list is currently empty. If I trusted a particular software or document publisher, I could add their name to this list and say that from now on I trust everything I get from that person. Trusted Locations interested as well. This shows the locations on my computer where I trust what’s there and as you can see, I’ve included the location which has the User Templates in it, which we looked at earlier on. So, the Settings in the Trust Center are very important, but we’re not going to look at any of them anymore just for now. Let’s now look at some of the protection that we can specifically apply to a document. We’re going to start by looking at one of the very important features that was introduced recently to

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Word and improved in Word 2010 which is the Document Inspector. In Backstage View, if we click on Check for Issues, one of the options is Inspect Document. This gives us a range of optional checks that we can perform on our document and some of them relate to protection and security. For instance, the second one relates to Document Properties and personal information. It may well be that when we distribute our document, we won’t actually be able to restrict people from reading the document but we may want to make sure that there’s no hidden personal information or anything in the document that would create a security risk. Apart from the possibility that we’ve got a name hidden perhaps in the properties of the document that shouldn’t be there, we may also have, for instance here, some Hidden Text. One or two of the options in the Document Inspector we’re not going to use, Custom .xml Data is one of them. But let’s do an Inspect and see what happens. The Document Inspector has reviewed our document, decided there are no comments, revisions, versions, and annotations. There’s no invisible content or Hidden Text, but it’s warning us about two things. It’s telling us that Document Properties are set and the Author is included. Well, we’ve been working on this document for some time and we know about that. We’re not concerned about either of those. If we were, we could click on Remove All and Word would Remove those things for us. Similarly it’s telling us that there are Headers, Footers, and potentially Watermarks. Again, we put in the Headers and Footers quite deliberately, we don’t need to Remove them, but Word is warning us. So the Document Inspector is a useful check to perform on a document before we distribute it. One of the longest standing ways of protecting a document is to Password Protect it. In Word 2010, Password Protection is still a key to security for our documents and in Word 2010, it’s combined with Encryption. Encryption is additional security you can apply to a document. The Encryption scrambles the Password to protect the document from unauthorized people. You don’t really have to worry about how the Encryption works. Word handles everything. You just need to remember the Password. If I go into Protect Document on Backstage View and click on Encrypt with Password, I’m asked to enter a Password and I’m given this warning, “If you lose or forget the Password, it cannot be recovered”. I’m going to use my name as the Password and I’m asked to repeat that. Mainly because if I mistyped it the first time, as the characters I’m typing are not echoed, I wouldn’t realize I’d mistyped it and then I would have effectively forgotten my Password. So I have to enter it twice. Once I’ve done that, my document is protected with an Encrypted Password and this box changes to say a Password is required to

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Open this document. So, out of Backstage View, in fact I’ll Close it now, Save, Re-open as a Recent Document.

It says Enter Password to Open.

Put the correct Password in and

everything’s fine. Having applied a Password to my document, how do I subsequently remove it? Well, it’s Backstage View again, enter Protect Document. Once again Encrypt with Password. This time I Delete the contents of that Field, click on OK, and the Password is Removed. As we’ve seen the application of an Encrypted Password actually stops people from being able to access a document at all. If we actually want to restrict what people can do to the document, we have another feature under Protect Document that lets us achieve that. Restrict Editing. This brings up the Restrict Formatting and Editing Task Pane and we have a number of options here. This one, the second one, Editing Restrictions, allow only this type of Editing in the document, click on that, and we can set the level of change that’s allowed. So, the Default is to say that it’s Read Only. If you’re familiar with earlier versions of Word, you’ll know that you could actually setup a document to be accessible but in Read Only mode. Read Only mode is still available, but it’s set in this way in Word 2010. There are a number of other options. So, for instance, we can let people make Comments on the document.

They can’t change it, but they can Insert

Comments about it. If it’s a document with Form Fields, which we mentioned earlier, we can let people fill in the forms, but not change the Text of the document itself. We can also let people make changes to it, but these would normally be Tracked Changes where we could work out who’d made each change; quite a lot of flexibility in Editing Restrictions. Once we’ve chosen a change, for instance, supposing we said we’ll let people make Comments, we have a button down here that says, Start Enforcing this Protection. One other aspect of this, which is very important, is that if we’re in a situation, for instance, on a business network where we have named other Users or Groups of Users, we can specify which Users or Groups of Users can be Restricted to each of our types of access. So, for instance, we can say that a certain group of Users can actually make changes to the document, where for another Group of Users, it’s a Read Only document.

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Chapter 15 – Reviewing & Sharing Video: Reviewing, Sharing and Leaving/Adding Comments Toby: Sometimes when we’re working on a document, we’re working on it collaboratively with other people. We not only need to be able to Share our work on the document, but we would need to be able to Review others work, Comment on it, possibly even change it. In this chapter, we’re going to look at the facilities that Word 2010 offers for collaborating on a document. I’ve opened our Sydney document again and I’m looking at the Review Tab on the Ribbon. We’re going to start with a fairly straightforward action on this document. I’m going to act as if I’m a reader other than the author of the document and I’m going to make a Comment on it. First of all, I’m going to change my identity as far as Word is concerned. I can do this via Backstage View, but for now if I click on Track Changes, the bottom option says, Change User Name. It brings up the Word Options Dialog that we normally access from Backstage View and here I can change my name and I’m going to become “A Reader” and my initials are going to be AR. I’ve decided that I’d like to make a Comment on the History of Sydney and I’m going to make the Comment here. If you look at the Review Tab there is a button, a New Comment, click that once, and a Comment Box is put in place for me to type my Comment and my Comment is going to be, “We need to know more about Captain Flip.” So there we are; I’ve made a Comment about the document. Now, in making that Comment, Word although it’s Inserted some more Text, will not have actually changed the Formatting or Pagination or any other such feature of the document. It will have adjusted the View to accommodate that. Let’s see now how I can control the Viewing and Display of Comments. So, we can see the Comment that I’ve just made. After the word “Comment”, in brackets, my initials and a Comment Number. On the Review Tab, in the Tracking Group, there’s a number of important buttons. This one, Show Markup with the drop down next to it, click that. This is the one that controls what’s actually visible on the screen and at the moment you can see Comments checked. If I un-check that, Comments are hidden. Not Deleted, not gone, I can put them back on again, but they’re hidden. This is an important drop down because it enables us to Show and Hide a number of the Review and Sharing Options that we’re going to be using. Let’s leave Comments switched on for now.

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I’ve added some more Comments in the name of “A Reader” and I’ve set my identity back to its original name.

I’m now going to look at the Comments of “A Reader” and make some

Comments of my own. I can Comment on these in a number of ways. I can click inside the box and just type some more or having clicked inside this box; I can Insert a Comment of my own. This is in my initials, TA, and it relates to that one, it has a Reference TA to R1. I can put in my Comment. The difference in Coloring we’ll return to in a while. And you can see the Tool Tip saying when I Commented. On the Review Tab in the Comments Group, we have an easy way of navigating through the Comments in the document. Next and Previous takes us through the Comments and if we see a particular Comment, it’s easy to Delete it. Just press on Delete and the Comment’s gone. Clearly one has to have the rights to do this and you couldn’t have somebody who’s barely responsible for a document going through and Deleting everybody else’s Comments. But the Author would normally be doing this. If I look on Show Markup again, look at the drop down and click on Reviewers, I can also Show and Hide the Comments by individual Reviewers, which is pretty useful as well. I can disable Toby’s Comments or I can switch Toby’s on again and switch off A Readers. Again, a very useful facility. I’m going to Show all Reviewer Comments. So, I can Show and Hide Comments. I can Respond to them. I can Delete them. I’m now going to make some changes to our document and I’m going to Track those changes. At the nerve center of Change Tracking in Word is the Track Changes button in the middle of the Tracking Group on the Review Tab. All the time that’s highlighted, the changes I make to a document will be Tracked. I’m going to begin by changing the expression, “their love of a whole array” to “their passion for.” And the way that I’ve done that is to Delete the words “love of” and Insert the words “passion for.” Both are still visible, the Deletion with a Strikethrough, “passion for” in red with an Underline. Further down, I’m going to Insert a word, here I’m going to put the word “beautiful” before the word “beaches.” So, my changes are being Tracked and on the Show Markup drop down I can actually change the way that the changes are Shown. So, for instance, Show Revisions in Balloons will actually indicate a Deletion on the right here of “love of” and just leave the Insertion in place. Using these options, there’s quite a fine level of control over what can be shown as a change, including Insertions and Deletions. An even finer level of control is available using the drop down on Track Changes. Change Tracking Options brings up this Dialog where we can change how the Markup is shown, how Moves are shown,

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how Formatting changes are shown, and so on. It’s a very powerful Dialog and particularly if you’re using a lot of Change Tracking with large groups of users, it’s a very good idea to get familiar with the different uses of the Settings in this Dialog. I’m now going to Review all of the Comments and Changes that have been proposed in the document.

In practice we normally deal with Comments differently from Changes.

And

Comments are usually dealt with by Reviewing them and deciding whether any Changes need to be made as a consequence of them. I’m going to assume for the purposes of today that the Comments that are made here, that there are three, have all been acted upon and really all I’m going to do is Remove the Comments themselves now. In the Comments Group I click on Next, go to the next Comment, I’m just going to Delete it. Next Comment, Delete it; Next Comment, Do I want to start from the beginning again? Yes. Delete and Next Comment Delete. The Changes are different. The users have actually made Changes in the Text of the document and it’s up to me to either Accept the Changes or Reject them. Over here on the Review Tab we have the Changes Group. Click on Next, I can see a Change which is the Insertion of the words “passion for.” I can see an associated Change of Deletion of the words “love of” on the right. This is rather flowery language for me and I’m going to Reject this Change. So I use the Reject button here and I have three options at the moment. I could Reject All Changes in the document, which I’m not going to do, but sometimes that’s a useful facility to have. I can either say, Reject this Change or Reject this Change and move onto the next one. I’m going to Reject this Change and move onto the next one. Well after Inserting “passion for” the next Change was Deleting “love of.” I’m going to Reject that as well because I now need that back in. Reject and move to next. And I have “many of the beautiful beaches.” I quite like that so I’m going to Accept that change. Again, there’s an option to Accept All Changes in the document or I can say Accept and move to next. There are no more. The document contains no Comments or Track Changes. Click on OK and I’m done.

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Chapter 16 – Customizing Word Video: Customizing with Word Options Toby: Welcome back. Now that we’ve seen most of the features of Word 2010, we’re going to look at some of the ways in which you can Customize Word to make the environment particularly comfortable and suitable for the way that you prefer to work on documents. We’ve seen many of the options available already. We’re going to review some of the most important ones and introduce some others. We’re going to start with some of the features that we’re already taking for granted. I’ve typed a sentence here and Live Preview is one of the features that we’ve used extensively so far. So, for instance, if I go to the Styles Group here, hover over one of the Styles, Heading 1, Heading 2, it shows me the effect of those Styles on the Text that I’ve typed. That’s Live Preview. If I look at a button like the Italic button, it tells me it’s Italic and it gives me a summary Italicize the selected Text. If I select part of the Text, hover over it, I can see the little faint Mini Tool Bar there. Let’s go into Backstage View, click on Options, the top option, General. Let’s try switching each of those things Off. Show Mini Tool Bar on Selection; let’s check that Off. Enable Live Preview; let’s check that off. Screen Tip Style, Show featured descriptions in Screen Tips; let’s check that Off. Click on OK. See what happens. Selected Text, no Mini Tool Bar. Hover over, no Live Preview. And if I hover over the Italic button, it tells me Italic but it doesn’t give me a description. Let me just switch those back on again. Clearly, it would take me a long time to go through every one of these options, but hopefully those two or three very significant ones show you that in many cases features that we either do or don’t like can be switched on or off accordingly. It’s always worth looking to see if something can be enabled or disabled to suit your style better. One other interesting option here on the General Tab is this one. We do have a choice of Color Schemes. Functionally, it doesn’t make a lot of difference, but if you fancy the black Color Scheme how about that. With any Word document there are Objects in it that we can’t see. These Objects can include things like pieces of Hidden Text where we’ve entered Text and deliberately chosen to hide it. But they also include various Formatting characters such as Paragraph Marks and Tab Characters

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and so on. We can change Word Setup to show these. Again, in Backstage View, Word Options; this time looking at the Display Option. We have quite a fine level of control over characters that we can show. The lowest setting says, Show All Formatting Marks. Let’s see what that shows us on our Sydney document. If I scroll down through the document you can see the Tab Characters in the Table of Contents that Tab from, the name of the Heading to the Page Number. And throughout the document, you can see an assortment of Paragraph Markers, but then also Cross-Reference entries and so on. It’s sometimes useful to be able to see these Characters because it’s sometimes explains some behavior that we can’t otherwise account for. And apart from the showing of Paragraph Markers, the same Display Page can be used to show various Printing options. For instance, even if we’ve got Hidden Text we can check this box to Print it. We can check this box to Print the Document Properties along with the document. Switch the Formatting Marks Off again and we’re back to how things were. Let’s look at a few more of the Word Options. Proofing Options, we’ve already reviewed. Save Options we’re going to be looking at later in relation to recovering from problems with Word. But for the moment, let’s look briefly at one or two of them. When we Save a document, this option specifies the Default which is a .docx, which is a Word 2007-and-10 Format document. That’s the Default. We can actually set the Default at anything we like. Word has an Auto-Save and Auto-Recover feature, which means that as we’re working it Saves a Copy of the document for safe keeping at regular intervals and you can change that interval here. It’s currently set at 10 minutes. If for any reason I Close a document without Saving, I can instruct Word to keep the last Auto-Recovered version for me, which is useful for recovering in the case of either disaster or just a mistake on my part. We can also set here things like the Default File location. In my case it’s my, My Documents Folder. Language Options are quite important as well. My primary Language is set to English UK. Clearly, I could change that; I can add other Languages. For instance I could also work in French, any version of French, perhaps the France version of French, and so on. The Advanced Page contains a huge number of options. Far too many to go through here, but let’s just pick out one or two of the more important ones. Perhaps the most important one is the option to Show Field Codes. We’ve talked about Fields a little and we’re going to see a little bit more about them a little later on. But sometimes it’s very useful to be able to see all of the Field Codes in a document. I’m moving down here; a number of Print options. So, for instance, we can instruct Word to Print Field Codes instead of their values and

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the option to always Create a Back-up Copy of a document, which is one that a lot of people like. It means that whenever you start working on a document, Word Saves a Copy of it in case it all goes horribly wrong and you can go back to that Copy. So, that’s some of the main options. Plenty more to look at, but the last thing we’re going to do in this section is to look at Customizing the Ribbon. One other option that you may find particularly useful is the option to Customize the Ribbon. I’m currently looking at the Home Tab and I’m going to add a new group onto this Tab. Bring up Backstage View; go to Word Options, Customize Ribbon. Now within the Home Tab I can introduce a new group. It appears here. I can rename it. Let’s call it “Test” for now. And I can Move Commands onto that Group. For instance, I could move the New Comment Command, add it to that Group. If I look at the effect on the Ribbon, I can see Tab, New Group, New Command. If I select the Text, I can use the new Comment button and it works exactly the same as it does on the Review Tab. If I want to change things back, it’s quite simple. Back to Customize Ribbon. I can either Remove that one and Remove the Group or there’s actually a Reset button that lets me put the Ribbon back to the way it was before.

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Chapter 17 – Expanding Word Video: Expanding Word Functionality; Using Macros Toby: Hello again. We’re now going to look at ways of expanding Words functionality. There are two or three main approaches to expanding the functionality of Word. It is possible to actually buy various additional pieces of functionality, generally referred to as Add-Ins for Word and we’ll look at those in a moment. Another option is to actually use Words Programming Language, which is Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications or VBA to write software with which we can expand the functionality of Word in pretty much any way that we’d like to. The third option is to use a feature of Word itself which is enabled just to create Macros, not by writing Programming Code but by repeating and recording certain Tasks. So, let’s get started. To start to look at some of these options, we need to enable another Tab on the Ribbon. We now know how to Customize the Ribbon, so if we go to Word Options, Customize Ribbon, and look under Main Tabs on the right, you’ll see there’s one there that isn’t checked. That’s the Developer Tab. Let’s click OK on that and see what we get. So we now have a new additional Tab up here, Developer. Click on Developer Tab and we can see a whole range of new functions. Let’s start with the Add-Ins. We can download from Microsoft or buy from various sources including Microsoft, Add-Ins for Word. And this Dialog, Templates and Add-Ins Dialog helps us to manage those Add-Ins. Another type of Add-In is a COM Add-In. These are AddIns that have been developed using Microsoft’s Component Object Module or COM. None of these are installed here at the moment, although there’s one available for One Note and I could check that, click it, and it will be enabled. But what I’m going to do mainly, in this section, is to look at Macros. So, let’s take a look at Macros. On the Developer Tab, if we look over to the left we see the Visual Basic button which will bring up the Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications Workplace. We’re not going to be writing our own Code in Visual Basic for Applications, but if you do know how to Code or you’d like to learn how to Code, the facilities are here. We will be looking back at this window again in a short while. For Macros, we can also Create Macros using a Record facility. So if we have a particular sequence of operations that we perhaps perform

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repeatedly, we can Record that sequence and then treat it as a Macro in the same way as if we’d written the Code in VBA to do the same job. Now I’m going to write something that does a probably fairly pointless job on our document about Sydney, but I’ve tried to choose an operation that shows us a few of the capabilities when we’re Recording Macros. And what I’m going to do is to Record a Macro which will find the term “Sydneysiders” and then Re-format it in a particular way. So, let’s begin. To Record our Macro we start by clicking on Record Macro which brings up the Record Macro Dialog. I’m going to give my Macro a name of “FancyPara” and a description of “Fancy Formatting of a paragraph”. And one of the options I have is to Assign my Macro to a Keyboard Shortcut. I can use one of the unused shortcuts. I’m going to Control, Shift, and K. And I’m going to Assign my Macro to that shortcut. What that means is that if I use that Keyboard Shortcut from now on, my Macro will be run. So, Close that and now I’m going to actually Record the Macro. I’m not going to do a lot in Macro, just a bit to give the general idea. So I’m going to go to the Home Tab. I’m going to say that I’d like this paragraph Centered and I’d like to Insert Drop Cap at the beginning in the Margin and I think that’ll probably to do for now; just to give the general idea. When I’ve done what I want to do, I then Stop Recording and if I look in Macros here, there’s my Macro FancyPara. If you’d like to see what it actually looks like, it’s written in Visual Basic for Applications, Words VBA, and you can see the Codes that it’s put in to reflect the things that I’ve done. We’re not going to go through those now. If you want to learn VBA, it’s quite an interesting and challenging exercise, but if you just want to get your Macros by Recording as we’ve done here, you’ll be able to get on with that fine as well. So now that we’ve got our Macro, let’s go to another point in the document, down to another paragraph. Let’s say, let’s go to that one under Suburbs. Go to Macros, FancyPara is selected and we click on Run. And there is it. It’s Centered with our Drop Cap. And finally on our Macro, if we go to another paragraph way down here somewhere, let’s try our Keyboard Shortcut of Control, Shift and K to do exactly the same job. We’re now going to look at Forms in Word. We’ve mentioned Forms a few times before and in essence they give us another extension to the functionality of Word. They enable us to interface to our Users. Typically a Form is used to gather Data either for electronic storage or, in some cases, we might get somebody to complete a Form electronically on a computer and then we can

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Print out the Form with their responses and store the results on paper. Although Forms can be very complicated, the general principles are quite simple. We’re going to here Create a very, very simple Form which has a prompt for somebody’s name. So I’m going to type Name and then I’m going to enter a Form Field. On the Developer Tab in the Control Section, there are a number of Controls that we can use. One very simple one is a Rich Text Content Control; so I’m going to use that. Then I’m going to Record a person’s Date of Birth and one of the other Controls there is the Date Picker. In fact, this Group of Controls, eight or nine Controls, in the bottom right hand corner are what are called the Legacy Tools, which include Legacy Form Controls that have been in Word for a very long time and then Active X Controls of which there are many, and this little button in the bottom right gives access to a load more. You may not have all of these on your system. The ones you don’t have you can almost certainly download. You can also buy Active X Controls from third parties. So there’s quite a range of possibilities there. Once we have our Form, we can Enter Text in the first box and then we can go to the next box and the Date Picker gives us access to a Calendar. So Forms are basically as simple as that.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

Chapter 18 – Other Features Video: Importing/Exporting, Embedding Document to Other Programs Toby: Although Word 2010 offers us a wide range of features and facilities, there are still many situations where we need to use a different piece of software, a different program to fulfill a certain purpose. One of Word 2010’s greatest strengths is its ability to interact with other programs and we’re going to look at some of the features and facilities for interaction now. There are a number of approaches, some of them are specific to the Microsoft Office Suite of programs and some of them are quite general. Let’s begin by looking at simple approach to Importing and Exporting Data to and from Word. Let’s begin with one of the simplest ways to Import and Export Data and that’s to use Copy and Paste. If I take, for instance, this section of my Sydney document about Water. Let me Copy the Title Water and I can Paste it into a PowerPoint presentation.

Back to Word, Copy this

paragraph, switch back to PowerPoint, Paste the contents of that paragraph. That’s a very simple way of transferring Data, Importing and Exporting Data. Another very straightforward and useful option is the Save As option. If we want to Save our Sydney document in a different Format, we’ve already looked at some of the Formats such as the .html, but a Format that is very useful is .pdf format. This is the Adobe Portable Document Format, .pdf which is a long standing standard within the industry. And one of the main advantages of .pdf is that it’s a Format of document that generally speaking people can’t change and which if you distribute it to other people, will look that same to everybody. It’s virtually a way of distributing something that you don’t want people to be able to change. There are a number of options when we Save a document as a .pdf document, we can select the Page Range and so on, but basically it’s a simple operation. Publishing online and Printing gives us a Standard Size of document. If we want, if we’re only going to Publish the document online, so it’s not going to be a Printable document, we can Minimize the Size, but let’s stick with the Standard Setting, Save, and we finish up with a .pdf copy of our document. Having Saved my document in .pdf format, if I go to Windows Explorer, find my document, Enjoying Sydney.pdf and double click on it, it Opens in Adobe Reader. It’s no longer Editable,

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Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

but Hyperlinks work and I can see the full content of the document. Pdf format is an excellent Format to distributing documents. We’re now going to look at a couple of well established methods for sharing information between programs. The first of these is called Linking and I’m going to demonstrate it by looking at a Spreadsheet I prepared earlier of World Populations, which is an Excel Spreadsheet. The Data we’ve seen before. I’ve got it Open here in Excel. I’m going to Copy the Data, which is selected, and then in Word I’m going to start a New Document and where I would normally Paste the Data in there I’m going to do a Paste Special. And within Paste Special there is an option which is Paste Link and I’m going to Paste Link a Microsoft Excel Worksheet Object which Pastes my Data in there. But there’s something special about a Linked set of Data like this. Linking displays information stored in the Source Document, the Excel document, in another that we’ll call the Destination Document, and you can Edit the Linked Object from either File. Although all the changes are stored in the Source File, the original Excel. So if I now double click on this, what looks like a fairly straightforward plain Word Table, double click on it and I’ve actually got full Excel functionality on this Table. So I could say, well I think the population of China has increased by about a hundred while I’ve been talking, so I can make that change and this is reflected in the original Excel document. If I Close the Excel document now, Save the changes, within the Word document I still have the increased number. So that’s Linking. We’re now going to look at the second well established method for sharing Data which is called Embedding. The way that Embedding works is really quite different to Linking and if we wanted to Embed our World Population Worksheet into a Word document, we’d do it using Insert, Object, click on Object, and we can either Create a New Object of a particular type like an Excel Chart or we can Create it from an existing File. If we Browse to the File, let’s find our World Population Spreadsheet, click on OK, and what appears to happen is the same as happened before. Our population of China has gone up by a hundred, but the effect of this is actually quite different. If I now Edit this using the same Tools and now I say my population has gone up to 200, again in the time that I’ve been talking. I can see the change appearing there in my document. Let me Close my Word document, Saving the changes. It’s going to be called Doc 1 and now let me go back to my World Population Spreadsheet, Open that up, and you’ll see

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Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

that that hasn’t changed. So when you Embed a document, it’s changed in the Destination but not in the Source. It is possible to Link and Unlink Embedded Objects, but in this case this was Unlinked. There are many ways of sharing Data between programs, communicating with other programs. We’ve looked at Linking and Embedding. We’ve looked at Copy and Paste, Save As, and so on. There’s also the more technical ways of communication, such as the use of .xml files, but Word also has a large number of very straight forward ways of communicating that have very specific purposes. We’ve looked at some ways that Word and Excel can communicate with each other. Let’s look at how Word can communicate with PowerPoint in both directions. Quite a common situation we’re in is that we’ve got a document and we’d like to prepare a PowerPoint presentation to a company the presentation of the document. I’ve taken our Sydney document and stripped out some of the various bits and pieces, Bibliography and so on and just left the main body of the document. If I go to the Backstage View and go onto Word Options and choose Quick Access Tool Bar.

I’m going to Customize that. I’m going to look at All

Commands and I’m going to look at a Command way down here somewhere which is very useful which is, where has it gone? Send to Microsoft PowerPoint and I’ve added it to the Quick Access Tool Bar, it’s that one. If I click on that, it starts up PowerPoint and it actually makes for me a presentation. Quite a short presentation in this case, but it takes each Level 1 Heading in my document as a new slide and it puts the Heading 2 Levels underneath and I could use slides of this sort to accompany a presentation of my talk about Sydney. Finally in this section I’m going to look at sending information in the opposite direction that is from PowerPoint to Word. I’ve Opened a very simple PowerPoint presentation on quality insurance. I’ve enabled the button on the PowerPoint Quick Access Tool Bar to do the send from PowerPoint to Word, click on the button, brings up the Send to Microsoft Word Dialog. Five options here of the form in which I would like the contents of the PowerPoint presentation presented to Word. I’m going to go for Outline Only and with some of the options I have the option of clicking on Paste Link here. Once I’ve sent the PowerPoint presentation to Word, if I subsequently change the presentation, the two will get out of step. If I select Paste Link, then changes to the PowerPoint presentation will be updated in the Linkage through to Word. I only want the Outline, click on that, Word is now thinking about it, and when it’s finished go into the

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Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

relevant document. It’s actually an Outline so I’m going to look at it in Outline View and there we are, a conventional Word document in Outline View. If you normally develop a presentation by doing the PowerPoint first and then filling in the detail in a Word document, this is a very good way to work.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

Chapter 19 – Problems & Maintenance Video: Check for Updates, Safe Mode Toby: Hello again. We’re now going to look at some of the problems we might encounter with Word and generally how to keep our copy of Word in tip-top condition. First of all, it’s very important with any of the software in the Microsoft Office Suite to make sure that updates and particularly security updates are kept up to date. If we go to Backstage View and click on Help, there’s a button, Check for Updates which takes us through to the Microsoft Update site where our copy is checked to make sure that there are no outstanding updates. If you use Windows Update in general, then it’s quite likely that you’re copy of Office, if it’s properly registered and activated, any updates for it will be included in your Microsoft Update. Looking at the message I’ve got here from Windows Update, Updates are available for your computer, one important update is available. I’m going to deal with that later, but it’s very important to get into habit of either making sure on a regular basis that you’re up to date or setting your updates up in such a way that they’re applied automatically. Other very important aspects of our work in Microsoft Office in general and Microsoft Word 2010 in particular is understanding and using the Auto-Save and Auto-Recover features. We looked at Auto-Save before. If we click on File, go to Word Options in the Save Options then we will normally have an Auto-Save every 10 minutes. That’s a typical figure although we can Save it. That means that if the worst happens, the worst that will happen is that we’ll lose up to 10 minutes of work. The Auto-Recovered Files are kept in this specific location which we can change if we need to. And a combination of Auto-Save and Auto-Recover should mean that we never lose a very significant amount of work. One other aspect of this which is very important is that when we Auto-Recover a document or when we’re invited to Auto-Recover a document we may sometimes wonder whether we’ve got the right version or we might get quite confused about versions of documents that we’ve been working on and there’s a very good feature of Word 2010 that can help with that which we’re going to look at next. The useful feature of Word 2010 that helps us to resolve issues where we have more than one copy of a document and we’re perhaps struggling to find out or work out which is the one that

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we really need is on the Review Tab and it’s the Compare facility; Compare two versions of a document. In the Compare Documents Dialog, we select the document that we believe to be the original. Select the revised document, the one we want to do the Comparison with, choose what we want to Compare. At the moment, this is virtually everything chosen, selected with a check boxes. If I for instance didn’t want to check Headers and Footers because I was going to put those right or change those anyway, I may decide that Footnotes and Endnotes are not important and so on. At the moment, virtually everything is checked, click on OK, and Word produces a very detailed report on the differences between the two documents. The differences are marked as changes in the same way that Change Tracking works and I get a good Summary on the left here: Summary, 26 revisions comprising 14 Insertions, 10 Deletions, and 2 Formatting changes. And if I scroll through my document here, I can get a list of all those changes that have been made and I can go through the original document and the revised document pretty much line by line and look for all the changes. That’s a very useful facility. We’re now going to look up one of the Auto-Recovery features of Word 2010 in practice. Let’s suppose that we’ve been working on our Sydney document for some time and when we come to Close it we absentmindedly click on Don’t Save rather than Save. In previous versions of Word we’d probably think we’d lost all of our work, but in Word 2010 we can actually go back to the previous Auto-Recovered version without too much trouble. So I’m in Word, I’ve just made the mistake I just described, go to the File, Backstage View, Recent, and near the bottom of the Recent list is Recover Unsaved Documents. Now this gives me access to a number of Unsaved documents that I’ve Saved over the last few sessions and in each case it gives me the most recent Auto-Recover version. So I was working on Enjoying Sydney, the most recent version I’ve got is there; I can Undo it and it’s there available for me to work on. Of course, it may not be completely up to date because the last few things I did are in it in a few minutes may have been lost, but subject to me having Auto-Save set up with a frequency of say 10 minutes, it will give me a pretty recent version of the document. One other feature of Word 2010 that you might find useful is Safe Mode. If you’ve been using the Windows Operating System for some time, you’re probably aware of Safe Mode. If you’ve had a problem with your computer, it won’t start or part of it won’t function, a Diagnostic Technician or somebody on a Help Desk might ask you to start the computer in Safe Mode. In

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Learn Word 2010 by Simon Sez IT

this mode some of the features of the computer are disabled, but you’re more likely to be able to start the computer and diagnose problems. Safe Mode for the programs in the Microsoft Office 2010 Suite pretty much works on the same principle. Some of the functionality of each of the programs is disabled, but you’re more likely to be able to start the program you’re having trouble with and start to diagnose the problems. The way to start any of the programs in Office 2010 from Safe Mode is straight forward. Hold the Control key down and then either by double clicking on the Desktop icon or by choosing the program from the Start Menu, start as normal with the Control key held down. You get this little Dialog, Word has detected you are holding down the Control key. Do you want to start Word in Safe Mode? Say Yes and it starts up in Safe Mode. And finally, let’s look at one other useful feature which can help us to repair problems with our installation of Word 2010. Sometimes our whole installation, possibly of the whole of Office can be corrupted or broken in some way and it’s possible to use the features of the Windows Control Panel to attempt a repair of our installation. If you go to the Start Menu, click on Control Panel, click on Programs, Programs and Features, go to Microsoft Office Professional in my case, and right click on Change. One of the options is Repair. The exact sequence to get to this point will depend on which version of Windows you’re using and exactly which version of Microsoft Office you’re using, but there will be an equivalent to this within your system. You may be running on Windows XP or Windows Vista. You may have a different version of Microsoft Office, but in general a similar approach will get you to the point where you can attempt a repair of your installation. That’s worth knowing about as well.

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