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Learn Outlook 2010

Table of Contents Chapter 1 – The Basics Getting Started .........................................................................................................4 Overview of Calendar, Appointments, Contacts, Tasks, Notes ...............................7 Adding New Accounts, Removing Accounts ........................................................11 Add Item, To-Do Options and Customization .......................................................15 Creating New Task, Modifying Details, Recurring Tasks .....................................19 Calendar Displays, Set Up/Edit/Delete Appointments ..........................................23 Using Help Options; Add/Edit/Delete Contacts ....................................................27 Create, Edit, Forward Notes...................................................................................31 Options, Create, Send Journal Entries ...................................................................34 Chapter 2 – Beyond the Basics Customize Quick Access Toolbar & the Ribbon ...................................................37 Customizing the Workspace Views Part 1.............................................................40 Customizing the Workspace Views Part 2.............................................................44 Managing Data File Folders...................................................................................48 Outlook Connector; Customizing Mail..................................................................52 Creating Rules for Sent/Incoming Emails .............................................................56 Formatting Email Messages ...................................................................................60 General Mail Options .............................................................................................64 Assigning/Completing Tasks .................................................................................68

Forward/Edit/Group Contacts ................................................................................71 Setting Up Meeting Requests; Calendar Options ..................................................75 Setup RSS Feeds ....................................................................................................80 Organize RSS Feeds, New Social Connection ......................................................81 Junk Mail Options, Dealing with Junk Mail ..........................................................88 Filtering Through & Searching for Specific Emails ..............................................92 Auto Archive Options & Manual Archive .............................................................96 Email Security & Maintenance ............................................................................100

Learn Outlook 2010

Chapter 1 – The Basics Video: Getting Started Toby: Hello. My name is Toby. Microsoft Outlook is the world’s leading PC-based personal information manager. It began life in 1997 as an Email application, but now with Outlook 2010 it incorporates Contact Management, Appointment Management, and much more. We’re going to be looking at Outlook 2010 on the Windows 7 operating system. If you’re using it on Windows XP or Windows Vista some things might look slightly different, but the approach should always be the same and there shouldn’t be any significant differences between the way the way that you do things and the way that I’ll be doing things. So, there’s a lot to learn about Outlook, let’s get started. First of all, let’s see how to get Outlook started on our PC. There are a few ways, but the two that you’re most likely to use are these. If you go to the Start Menu, click on All Programs, and then look for the group Microsoft Office. Outlook 2010 will be within that group. Let’s just Close it down again. The other likely and most popular way that you will start it is using the Desktop Shortcut. I’ve got one here for Microsoft Outlook 2010 and away I go. To Close it down again, there are again a couple of options. The main one is to just use the Close button in the top right corner. I’m going to Open it again from the Start Menu. Once you’ve used it a few times, it will move here on to the main area of the Start Menu, unless you arrange things otherwise to avoid you going through the Office group. Okay, it’s started; now let us start to look at what we can see in the Outlook Workspace. If you’re new to Outlook or if you’ve used an older version, say 2003 or older, the Workspace that we’re looking at now may seem quite unfamiliar to you. So I’m going to spend a little bit of time first of all explaining it. Along the top of the space you have the Ribbon, which is a common feature of all of the elements of Microsoft Office 2010. It was also actually in 2007 as well. Along the top of the Ribbon are a number of Tabs and if I select a Tab it shows me a whole range of Commands that in some way are grouped together or relevant to each other. I’m going to click on the View Tab to begin with. I now have effectively four panels of information. The thought that it’s always four can be a little bit deceptive, but for the moment think of it as four. On the left we have the Navigation Pane and if I go up to the Ribbon, there is a button here © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 called Navigation Pane and if I click on that I can see that Normal is selected. If I were to select Minimized instead, it would appear to disappear, but actually it’s on the left hand edge here. That is the Navigation Pane in its Minimized form. Put it back to Normal or I can switch it Off altogether. That’s an important aspect of all of these elements to understand. This is the Reading Pane. Reading Pane, I can put on the Right as it is now. I can put it at the Bottom; it’s now that area. Or I can switch it Off. I’ll put it back to Right. And over here, I have the To-Do Bar. Looking at what we just did with the Navigation Pane you may be able to guess what form that’s in.

Yes, it’s Minimized.

If I bring it to Normal I get Calendar Dates, List of

Appointments, and so on, that we’ll be coming back to in a little while. I can also, of course, switch it Off. Let’s put it back to Minimized. And if you’ve used any other applications in the Office 2010 set, you’ll know what happens if I click the File button up here; I get Outlook 2010s Backstage View which is also going to be extremely important. Switch if Off by clicking on File again. As I said during the introduction, Outlook started out as a purely Email program and so Email is still a very fundamental part of what it can do for us. So that we start to get a feel of how the Workspace actually operates, let’s look at Email, a couple of very simple examples. In the Navigation Pane on the left you can see one item highlighted and it’s labeled Inbox (2). This is the Inbox for one of my Email Accounts. I’ll talk more about those Accounts in a moment. And if I click, I have two items that are highlighted here. These are actually Emails that I haven’t actually read. If I click on one of those items, it is selected and the Reading Pane now contains the Email that I’ve received. I can see who’s sent me the Email, which is a UK Company, electronics Company. And if I’d like to get a bigger view of the Email, if I double click on this the Email opens out into a separate Reading Window. More details are there. One of the features of the Email I’m looking at the moment is that there are actually some Graphics in it that have been suppressed for Security reasons. This is going to be a common feature when I’m looking at any items in Outlook and if you have adequate Security you’re going to encounter the same situation. If I hover over this area, click on it with the left mouse button, click on Download Pictures, then I see the Email as it was sent. It’s just Downloading the Pictures and there we are. There’s my Email with all of the Pictures included. And basically reading an Email is just about as simple as that.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 How about Sending an Email?

I actually need to invite my friend Larry over for dinner

tomorrow night. So I’m going to send him an Email now. I’m currently looking at the Home Tab and on the very left of the Home Tab, there’s actually a New Email button. Click that and up comes a Message Window. On that Window, I have a To button, which I can use to select the people or person I’m going to send the Email to. CC button which tells me who I’m going to Copy on the Email and the Subject of the Email. So, just remember what I’m going to send the Email about, Dinner on Thursday. For the To, if I don’t want to select using that button, I can start typing the name or address of the person who I’m going to send it to and Outlook will normally fill the name in for me when I get a certain part way through my typing. So if I start with, actually that’s great because as soon as I type L it’s come up with the guys name. Now in the Body of the Email I type the Text and I collected a little typing error there. Notice how Outlook highlights for me a mistyped word. That’s fine and then to Send the Email I merely click on the Send button. My friend Larry also has a work Email Account and I’ve just noticed in my Inbox that I’ve got an Email from here related to work. In fact it’s to do with a Microsoft working together on Projects Initiative. And he’s Forwarded that on to me and I’m just going to Reply to him to let him know I’ve got the Message and I’m going to read it. So if I Open it I have a Reply option. It gives me the option to automatically Download Pictures. I’ll say Yes for the moment. In my Reply I can say: Hi Larry, Got the Message. Let’s discuss over dinner tomorrow. Regards, Toby. And I can Send that. Close the original Email and that’s the second Email I’ve sent. The second one was a Reply to an Email received. When I’ve sent Emails I usually want to keep a Copy for myself. Not everybody does, but most people do. Just finally in this section let’s have a look at where those copies go. I have here under the Inbox Folder a Sent Items Folder and there are the two Emails that I’ve just sent. I have a system whereby every now and then my File those away in Folders specifically related to the subject matter. But that’s a subject for later on in the course. For the moment, I’m going to leave them there and tidy them up later. In the next section, we’re going to look at the other aspects of Outlook, the Non-email ones, such as handling Appointments, Tasks, Contacts, and so on. I’ll see you then.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Overview of Calendar, Appointments, Contacts, Tasks, Notes Toby: Hello again. So, we’ve had a look at the Microsoft Outlook 2010 Workspace. We’ve sent some Email, we’ve read some Email, replied to some Email. Now we’re going to look at some of the other aspects of Outlook 2010 that are important to us. In order to do that, we need to look again at the Navigation Pane on the left here. It’s actually in two parts. There’s an upper window section and a bottom section with a number of buttons on it. And it’s the buttons on the bottom that we’re going to look at now. They correspond to the main Modules in Outlook: Calendar, Contacts, Tasks, and of course, Mail. If we click on the Calendar button, we get a completely different View and in the main Window here we now see a Calendar. This area is generally called the Information Viewer and it varies depending on which of Outlooks Modules we’ve got selected. Here we can see that we have a Calendar for today. If we go to the Home Menu, we can see a selection. We can have a Calendar for our working week which shows our hours of work for the week, for the month, for the next seven days, and so on. If we click on Contacts we have a list of Contacts, and we can again change the View of our Contacts which we’ll come back to in a moment. Tasks give us an outstanding Task list. So we’re going to work our way through these other main Modules, the Non-email Modules and let’s start with Calendar. So now I’m looking at my Calendar in Outlook and I’ve got today’s date there. I’ve got a Single Day View and what I want to do is to put a note of that Appointment that I’ve suggested with Larry for tomorrow evening for our dinner appointment when we’re going to talk about the Microsoft Initiative as well. To put an Appointment in my diary, there’s a number of ways of doing it, but I’m going to start with this very quick and dirty way. Click on tomorrow’s date, use the Scroll Bar here to go down to the sort of time that we’d normally have dinner, and type in brief note with a question mark. And we certainly don’t get through our dinner in half an hour or an hour, so I can now stretch that Appointment in my diary say till 10 o’clock, 10:30, and that Appointment is now in my diary. That’s a nice, quick, dirty way of adding an Appointment. Once I added that Appointment to my Calendar, a Tab opened up here with Calendar Tools with Appointment within it, and this gives us an extra set of Tools that we can use and relate into a scheduled Appointment. We’re going to look at all of these later, but for the moment let’s just

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Learn Outlook 2010 look at one of them that’s really quite useful in this situation, and that’s Invite Attendees. I actually mentioned to Larry earlier on about this Appointment in my Email, but if I wanted to send him either a reminder or a first invitation, I can use this option. I can type his Email Address in there, which comes up when I start typing L-A. And I can actually send him a reminder, type a few words in here, and away it goes. Oh, I forgot to put the location. Well he knows where I live, so I’ll Send anyway. Having looked at the Calendar, I’m now going to take a quick look at Contacts. This is one of the other main Modules within Outlook 2010 and the list of Contacts here I’ve got is quite a short list. It’s only got about seven or eight people in it and not too many details. We’re going to add all that as we go along. If we click on the View Tab, we can see we have a number of options for viewing our Contacts. The one I have here is the List option, the simplest View where I can display basic information about each of my Contacts, including things like name, the Company they work for, the department they’re in, and so on. I also have an option to show a Phone List, a brief card about each person, or a full Business Card about each person. These simulate normal paper business cards, name, address, phone numbers, and so on; although the phone numbers aren’t shown on here at the moment. Having chosen my View I’m going to go back to List View. I can then Customize that View. Again, that’s something we’ll look at later on. For the moment let’s go back to the Home Tab and see how we Add a New Contact. New Contact button is on the left there, click on New Contact. A Dialog comes up which has a lot of options in it and we’re going to look at most of these during the course. In principle, virtually everything on here is optional. You don’t have to record details. You obviously need enough details about a Contact to make it useful information, but if all you’ve got is their name that is enough. So, I’m going to Add a Contact that quite often gets added in these situations. His name is John Doe. Quite straightforward, put in Title Mr., First John, Last Doe, Middle name is optional, Suffix is optional, could be John Doe Jr. for instance. Click on OK. If I have Address details I can add them. Phone details I can add them. Email I can add it. I’m going to take a stab at this one, for the Email Address and so on. Once I’ve completed the details that I’m going to complete I click on Save and Close, and John is now in my list. The Save As that I said I’d cover again, just briefly mention that here. The Save As is the Format that I like my names in for Sorting purposes. If you look at the Save As here, so for instance, Tina Androtti as Androtti,

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Learn Outlook 2010 Tina. They’re actually in alphabetical order of Save As, which means I can actually govern how I list them when they’re in alphabetical sequence. I’m now going to look at one of the other main Modules within Outlook 2010 and that’s Tasks. On the lower part of the Navigation Pane if I click on Tasks I bring up the Tasks Information View. I have no Tasks scheduled at the moment. So the first thing I’m going to do is to add a New Task: on the Ribbon at the left, New Task. The Task I’m going to add is to prepare for the Microsoft Initiative discussion with Larry. I’m going to start that today but I need to finish it by tomorrow when we’re having dinner and we’re going to talk about this. So my Start Date is today from the Calendar Picker there, End by tomorrow. It’s not really that important. It’s not something that’s particularly urgent for us, so I’m going to leave the Priority as Normal and the Status of this Task is not Started. Although I’m planning to do it I haven’ actually done anything about it. So, I’m going to Save that Task and it appears in my Task List. If we go to the View Tab, change View again, the number of Views for Tasks is really quite large. We can View Tasks that are Overdue, Tasks for the next seven days, High Priority Tasks, ones we’ve completed, and so on. Detailed View gives me the List. I only have one Task in it at the moment and if I double click that item I get the full detail of the Task. I can add some Task here to describe, Task Detail here to describe exactly what I want to do. So that’s a very, very brief look at Tasks. Tasks are going to very much feature when we start to look to do activities and the Link between the Tasks and the Calendar is also very important, but we’re going to come back to that in a little while. One of the almost indispensible parts of the equipment in the modern Office is the Yellow Sticky Note, sometimes called a Post-It Note. Outlook has Post-It Notes as well, they just call them Notes. If I click on Notes on the bottom of the Navigation Pane I bring up an Information View for Notes and up to the left of the Ribbon there’s a New Note button. And really a Note, as with a Post-It Note, is a place to write a random piece of information, a little aide memoir about something. So, for instance, I might say, ah I just had a great idea for dinner tomorrow night. I know that Toby really likes scallops and he likes white wine with it as well. So maybe I just make a little Note of that here. I type it into the Note. It puts a Date and Time on it for when I actually recorded that Note, click on Close, and it’s there, Menu idea. It is a Yellow Sticky Note.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 There’s another very important Module within Outlook 2010 that rarely even gets mentioned and that’s the Journal. We’re going to look at the Journal in some detail later on, but for the moment let’s just see how we can make a manual Journal entry. If I go to the bottom of the Navigation Pane, go to this dividing line here, pull it up until I see Folder List, click on Folder List. The Journal is there. I get a Dialog that invites me to turn on Automatic Journaling, which I’m not going to do. But then I can take anything that I do, for instance, I could take this Sent Item here which is the Appointment invitation that went to Larry and I could Drag it onto the Journal. Save and Close. Click on Journal and I now have a Journal entry that records the fact that a meeting request was sent to Larry on a certain Date at a certain Time. I can actually Log all or selected aspects of my activity either manually or automatically in Outlook. Not a lot of people use this facility which I think is a pity. Okay, we’ve covered all of the basics now. Now we’re going to start to go through these features of Outlook and others in more detail.

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Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Adding New Accounts, Removing Accounts Toby: Hello again. So far we’ve been looking at just one of my Email Addresses in my installation of Outlook. In practice, most people have more than one Email Address nowadays and in any case you will need to know how to set yours up in your copy of Outlook. So let’s look at how to do that now. Backstage View is accessible via the File Tab and we have a big button here, Account Settings that I’ll come to in just a moment, but up here I have my one existing Email Address accessible to me. I click on the drop down next to that. It gives me an option to Add another Account. I have a couple of other Email Accounts that I’m going to access from Outlook here and I’m going to Add one of those now. If I click on Add Account, it comes up with a Dialog. I actually have a number of options here. One of them is I can setup a purely Text Message Account or I can setup an Email Account. Another option that we may sometimes need to use down here is a Manual Configuration option. Some Email from some providers needs a little bit more work to setup and we’ll probably come back to an example of that shortly. Most Email nowadays though is pretty easy to setup in Outlook and the first Account I’m going to setup is one from one of the very popular providers, so there should be no problem. I’m going to first of all type in the name that I’m going to use for this Account. I’m going to call it Toby’s Gmail Account. I’m going to put my Gmail Account name in there, it’s actually called [email protected] I type in my Password. That will have been given to me when I set the Account up, and when I’ve done that I click the Next button and Outlook is going to try to enable that Account in Outlook for me. Let’s see what happens. Well after a few moments there’s good news. Outlook 2010 has congratulated me and told me that my new Account is now accessible via Outlook. You can see some of the actions it’s ticked. It’s said it’s established a network connection, found the settings which enable Outlook to access my Email, Logged on, Sent a test Message, and has now configured my Account. If I click on Finish and then look back at the Navigation Pane, I can see down here a second area for my second Account. And, in fact, it’s already got four Email Messages which are all Welcome Messages because this is a newly setup Account. You already know how to Open those Messages. If I click on a Message in the Inbox, the Message appears on the right or of course I can double click the Message and Open it up. And just as a reminder, because of the Security

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Learn Outlook 2010 that’s on my PC I can’t actually see the Pictures in here. If I hover there and click on Download Pictures eventually the Pictures appear, and there we are. So I now have two Email Accounts accessible in my installation of Outlook 2010. Let me go back to Backstage View, just take another look, and here I can see my two Accounts there. I’m going to setup a third Account. This one is going to be slightly different, but is an important one to show you. And if you have a Hotmail Account or a Microsoft Live Account this is how you would access that Account. So I’m going to go back to Add Account. My name is going to be on this one Toby’s Microsoft Live Account and my Address for that is [email protected] I’ve got my Password for that. Click on Next. Let’s see how we get on with that one. Now this is an interesting one because for a Hotmail Account or a Microsoft Live Account, there is an option of using a thing called the Microsoft Outlook Connector. This enables you to connect one of those Accounts to Outlook so that the Account is accessible either via Windows Live when you’re for instance traveling without access to Outlook or via your Outlook installation, your Outlook 2010 installation. If I’m invited to install the Outlook Connector I would say Yes and I’ll do that and come back to you in just a moment. So having installed the Outlook Connector which was pretty straightforward, I just followed the instructions from Microsoft and everything went very smoothly. I Closed Outlook, Re-opened it again, and I’m back to the point of trying to Add that Account. Let’s see what happens this time when I click on Next. It’s now trying to find that Account, which it should do pretty quickly. All of the Windows Live type Accounts are pretty accessible and it’s found all of the information it needs, click on Finish, and I have yet another Account. There’s one, there’s two, there’s three. So I have three Email Accounts. Back to Backstage View and there they are. I chose those three Accounts quite specifically because they are three different types of Email Account and they’re the main three types that you’re likely to come across. A Windows Live Hotmail type Account is referred to as a MAPI Account. Gmail, which is from Google is an IMAP type of Account. And this one from a private domain is what’s called a POP Account. These three types between them are the ones that cover the vast majority of Email that any of us will come across and to some extent with all three of them you should be able to set them up in Outlook as automatically as I just did. But there are situations where Outlook 2010 cannot detect the right settings to set a particular Account up. These nowadays are quite rare situations. When © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 you do come across this there is another option, which I briefly mentioned before, Manually Configure service settings or additional server types. Click on Next and we get into a Menu driven sequence of steps which will very much depend on the particular type of Account you’ve got. For instance, if you’re connecting to Microsoft Exchange at your workplace, which is something we’ll talk about later in the course, we follow this option. If it’s a specific type of internet Email Account, we follow this type and so on. I’m not going to go through all of these now because there are actually many and various options available now. If you have an Email Account and for some reason you cannot connect it to Outlook 2010 your internet service provider or ISP or the Company that provided you with the Email Account should be able to provide you with the exact sequence of steps you need to set your Account up in whichever version of Outlook you’re using, including Outlook 2010. So we’re going to leave that at the moment. We’ve setup three Email Accounts and they’re the ones we’re going to be using from now on. Now that we have three mail Accounts we’re going to look at some of the consequences of having this choice. For instance, if we go to Backstage View again, click on one of the Accounts, click on Account Settings, we get an Account Settings Dialog which shows our three Accounts and a number of pieces of information about each of them, most of which we’re going to come back to later. One of the very important things is our Default Account, which is the first one. Now while that’s set to the Default let’s see what that causes to happen. Close this again. If I want to Send a New Mail, which is something that I did earlier on in the course, I now have a From button and the From button let’s me choose which Account I want to Send it from, and as I choose the Account I’m sending from appears here. The Default is that one and whenever I click New Email that’s the first name that it will appear. Let’s take another look at our Email Accounts. We have three and the first one is set as the Default. I’m going to change the Default to be the Gmail one. Select it in the List, click on Set As Default, and there we are. But also the first Account we had, that one, I’m actually going to Remove the Account. I’m no longer going to use it. Are you sure? Yes. And now I just have two Accounts. Now that doesn’t actually Delete all of the Email that already exists in that Account, but it does stop me using it to Send and to collect Email. Bear in mind, of course, that the Email Account itself exists; I’m just not accessing it from Outlook anymore. © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 Of course, now that I’ve removed that Account, if I try to Send New Email, the From only provides me with two options, with my Gmail Account as the Default. And one other important thing about Email in relation to these Accounts, if I say go to my Live Account, look what a Message in it. For instance, this one, the only one I have at the moment. If I wanted to Forward that Message to somebody else, say, I wanted to Forward it to my friend Larry so that he can read about Hotmail or Windows Live Mail. If I click on Forward, again the usual warning about external content, it will always assume that it’s from the Account that the Email originally arrived into. Although, in fact, I can change it to one of my others. So it was an Email that was sent to my Live Account, if I Forward it, it Defaults to being Forwarded from my Live Account, but I can change that. So we’ve looked at quite a few aspects of Account Management and there are a couple more that we’re going to need to come back to later on. But for the moment, let’s leave it at those two Accounts and move on.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Add Item, To-Do Options and Customization Toby: Hello again. In this section, we’re going to look at the To-Do Bar. We mentioned it much earlier on in the course and I’ve currently got the Calendar open. The To-Do Bar is conventionally on the right of the screen. If I look on the View Menu, you may recall that under the To-Do Bar button here I can click on the drop down, three settings: Normal, Minimized, and Off. It’s currently switched Off. I’m going to switch it on Normal. The To-Do Bar which is this whole area on the right basically contains three sorts of information. It tells me about my next few Appointments in the Calendar. It tells me about any Tasks I have coming up and it will normally tell me about any Email Messages I Flagged for action. We just made the To-Do Bar visible by Maximizing it. We can Minimize it either by the same approach or by using this little arrow here. So Minimize it like that. When it’s Minimized there’s a much shorter list here. This basically says I’ve got one Appointment coming up which is my proposed dinner and then I’ve also got one Task to perform. So let’s look at how we use the To-Do Bar and some of the other things we can do around the area of reminding ourselves that we have things to do. First of all, let’s look at a couple of ways that we can add items to the To-Do Bar. If I go back to the Mail display and look at one of the Email Accounts that I setup earlier, look at the Inbox. There was an entry there about Importing your Contacts and old Email. That’s something that I need to do, to get all my old Contacts into my new Outlook. So I’m going to Flag that on my To-Do list. There are various ways of doing this, but one of the simplest ways is to literally to Drag that Email on to the To-Do Bar, drop it there, and it gives me a reminder about doing that Task. As an alternative, one thing that I could have done, was to right click on the Email and one of the options there is to Follow-up. Now I’ve already Flagged the Message now by Dragging it on to the To-Do, but I could’ve just clicked it here to achieve the same effect. So I have two items on my To-Do Bar. One of them marked as Today and one of them with no Date indicated. So I haven’t actually set myself a time limit on this Task. The second one relates to the Task where I’m going to prepare for the Microsoft Initiative discussion. I’ve actually done that now so I can Mark it as complete. If I put the mouse over and click right, the simplest way to deal with that is to click on Mark Complete. The effect of this I can see, if I now go back to the Tasks display, back over here, Tasks, if I look at that Task that I created before,

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Learn Outlook 2010 Prepare for Microsoft Initiative discussion with Larry, it’s marked as being 100% complete which means it’s still in my Task List but it’s done. It’s got a tick on the end. If we go back to the Mail option again, I’ve still got the item over here Flagged to Import my Contacts which was created by Dragging this Email on to the To-Do Bar. If I’ve changed my mind about that and said, well, I don’t actually need a reminder to do that. It’s not that urgent and I will come back to it later, but I want to remove it from my To-Do Bar for now. One of the simplest ways is to actually right click on the Email, go to the Follow-up Flag, and click on Clear Flag, and watch what happens both to the Email and to the To-Do Bar. The Flag there is paled out and it’s removed from my To-Do Bar. At any time if I want to put it back on again I can either Drag it as I did before, I can go to Follow-up and say Flag Message and it’s back on the Bar again. You may well be thinking by now that when you’ve been using Outlook 2010 for a while you’ll actually finish up with quite a lot of items on your To-Do Bar and that’s probably the case. Outlook provides us some good tools though to help us deal with the situation where we seem to have too many things to do to possibly get them all done, and one of the facilities it offers is the Category facility. This facility has been in Outlook for a long time although in recent versions it has changed, and I’m going to show you now how it works out in 2010. At the moment we have only a Default set of Categories setup. In many Views, such as in Task View on the Home Tab, there is a Categorize button, and if I click the drop down on that it shows me that I have six Categories; these are the ones that are the Defaults with Outlook 2010. If I click on All Categories, I can see that list and I have a number of options. I can introduce More Categories by clicking on New or I can Rename a Category, which is what I’m going to do now. I’m going to Rename that Category Red. I’m going to call it Urgent. Now if you’re using a Color Scheme, most people I think would probably mark urgent items red. Possibly ones that are going to be urgent, if they’re not dealt with soon, yellow. And perhaps the ones that are going okay people would mark green. But actually what you use and actually what you call them is completely up to you. I’ll stick with this naming of using Urgent. One little thing to mention in passing here is that you can actually assign a Shortcut Key to a Category. So if you want to quickly be able to mark something Urgent, you can just use that key sequence and it will automatically mark that item with this Category. So, Red is now Urgent. Click on OK. I’m going to do one more thing on this drop down and that is to go down to Set Quick Click. There is also an option of a single click on an item with the mouse to assign a Category and this is the Quick Click Category. I © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 could actually assign it to any of my available Categories. I’ve still got the other five. I’m going to make it Urgent though. And then if I go back down to the item here, Import your Contacts, and do a Quick Click, let’s see what happens. It’s Urgent and not only is it Urgent but the Category of Urgent has appeared on my To-Do Bar and any other Urgent items will be Grouped with that one. So following on from there, I’m going to do a little bit more work on my Categories a little bit later on and in fact what I’m going to do is set myself a reminder to do that. If I again click on the Home Tab here, when I’ve got a Task selected go into Categorize, All Categories. I’m going to Rename the Green Category and I’m going to call it Non-urgent. Okay. And I’m going to create a Task and I’m going to say that I need to sort out Categories. I’m going to Start today. It’ll be Due say by tomorrow and Priority is Normal, not started. I’m going to Categorize it. I’m going to say it’s Non-urgent and I’m going to say Save and Close. And now you can see on my To-Do Bar I’ve got Non-urgent – Sort out Categories, Urgent – Import your Contacts. So by now you’re starting to see how useful Categories can be and over time you’ll find that you create your own Category Scheme and I’m pretty sure you’ll find that it’s helpful. We now are going to return to the To-Do Bar itself and you may have noticed that even with the small number of items we’ve added so far it’s starting to look a bit crowded. If we Minimize it as we saw before we get very little information on it visible at all, but it’s very Customizable and the To-Do Bar can actually be made wider. If I Drag on this edge here and pull it to the left. Apart from the fact there’s a lot more space on the To-Do Bar itself, a second month pops into view and I can actually Drag that over to virtually the halfway point on the screen. There’s a lot more Customization we can do on the To-Do Bar. For instance, if we right click we have an option we’ve seen already, Normal, Minimized, Off, but we can also switch Off the Date Navigator. Let’s put that back On again. We can switch Off Viewing any Appointments such as that one, and we can switch Off Viewing the Task List. So that’s pretty Customizable. And there’s also a set of options here whereby we can say how many Month Rows we want on the To-Do Bar. We could, for instance, say let’s have two, in which case it would look like that. And we have some options about showing Appointments such as all day events, Private Appointments that we’ll be looking at later on, and whether we show the Task List. So the To-Do Bar itself is actually very

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Learn Outlook 2010 flexible and you will find that it helps you a lot in keeping track of the most urgent items that you need to deal with.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Creating New Task, Modifying Details, Recurring Tasks Toby: Hello again. In this section, we’re going to look at Tasks in a lot more detail. We’ve already added one or two Tasks just to get the basic ideas. But now we’re going to look at a lot more detail. There are a few ways of adding a Task and probably the simplest way is if you look at the To-Do Bar on the right hand side of the Workspace, there’s a little Text Box here that says Type a New Task. And rather than go through the routine of bringing up the Add Task Dialog and so on you can literally put a job in here, like Decide on dinner today. Hit the Enter key and that Task is already on our Reminder List. If I consider it to be important enough to Flag as an Urgent one, I can do that and it’s now in my Urgent List. That is a really simple way of adding a Task to the To-Do Bar. We’re going to look at adding Tasks now in a lot more detail, but just before we do let’s take a look at something that we haven’t looked at all so far and that is Keyboard Shortcuts. There are a lot in Outlook and many of them are very useful. One of the first that we need to look at relates to the Modules here. Now if I hover over the first one, Mail, look at the tip after Mail – Control and 1, Calendar – Control and 2, Contacts – Control and 3. Those numbers relate to their position on this Menu. If I want to switch to another one of the Modules, like Tasks for instance, I press Control and 4. It takes me straight to my Tasks. Control and 2 takes me to my Calendar and so on. So let’s go back to Tasks. Similarly if I want to create a New Task there’s a Shortcut for that as well. Okay I can see New Task on the Ribbon. But what about the Shortcut Control and N, and up comes the New Task Dialog. The Task I’m going to Create refers to some repairs I need done on my car. And I need to get a quotation for the repairs to the car so the Subject is going to be, “Get quotation for car repairs.” And I certainly haven’t started on it yet. For the Start Date, I’m going to start the Task today. Now when it comes to entering Dates we have a Date Control that we use here, click on that, and I can choose today’s date. In fact, I think I might start doing that tomorrow. So I’ll put in tomorrow’s date. And the Due Date Defaults to being the same as the Start Date which is tomorrow, Friday. Rather than use the Date Control I could actually just type the Date. So I could change the Due Date to say being the following Friday, which would be the 16 th of the month. Either way of typing is fine. Obviously, if you’re local format for Dates is month, day,

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Learn Outlook 2010 year you’d type accordingly. If we look at some of these other key fields here, we can see Priority is Normal. Well they’re not very urgent repairs; I’ll stick with Normal Priority. And at the moment it is 0% complete. I haven’t actually started on that job at all yet. I do have a tendency to forget things and I do like to use Reminders. So given that I’ve marked this as Normal Priority and I haven’t set any kind of Follow-up Flag on it yet, I may just ask for a Reminder, but I think maybe Friday itself next week might be too late. So I’m going to ask for a reminder on Tuesday the 13th just to make sure that something in Outlook says to me you need to get this quotation done. So, there we are. That’s the basic detail of my Task. I now Save and Close. Having added my New Task to get the quotation for my car repairs, I now need to change a couple of things about it. I’ve just realized that I’m probably pretty busy next week and I need something to Flag a little bit more strongly that this job needs to be done. So what I’m going to do is I’m going to Open that Task up, which I do by going to the Task List, locating the one I want, and double clicking. That Opens the Task Dialog and I’m going to Flag a Follow-up for next week. The other thing about it is that I’ve been given an internet Hyperlink for a good local tire center where I’ll be able to get my tires sorted out. So I’m going to Paste that in here. That’s handy so that when I actually come to get the quote I can click on there, get straight to their website, get a phone number, and so on. So having made the changes that I’m going to make to this Task I do Save and Close and the Task is back in the list again. Now one of the things that you will notice is that I have a now a range of Flags down here, different weights of Flag relating to the urgency of the Task that I have to do. And the use of these Flags and the Urgent and Nonurgent Categories and so on can be very useful to help you to visually prioritize the items, the things that you need to do. And one of the things about Tasks which is very useful sometimes, when we look at the list here, you can actually change some of the very simple details in this line, without opening up the Task Dialog. So, for instance, if I wanted to change the wording here say to Extensive Car Repairs, I can type it straight into there without opening the Dialog. Anything visible here I can type over and change. And also, as with any of these kinds of Tabular Control in the Office software products, I can rearrange by using the Headers to Drag the Columns wider and narrower and so on. And there is of course a way of Customizing this View, which we’re going to look at later.

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Learn Outlook 2010 I’m really finding it quite useful to setup these Tasks and Reminders and there’s a couple of things that I always forget to do or that always get delayed and I think now is the time to get them into my Outlook 2010 Reminder system. And the first of those is to Mow the lawn. Create a New Task as usual. I’m going to use the Keyboard Shortcut Control-N to get me started. And the Subject is Mow the lawn. And I really need to do it on Saturday. So I’ll put it down to Start Saturday and in fact End Saturday, of course. But there’s something a bit different about mowing the lawn and that is that this is a Task that I do on a regular basis. In fact, during the Summer I do it every couple of weeks. Now I can set this up as a Recurring Task and on this Bar here on the Task Dialog, Recurrence. Click on Recurrence and I get a number of options. I can choose a Recurrence pattern which is based on daily, weekly, monthly, or yearly. I can say how many of those time units I want to recur it on, what day of the week I want to do the Task on, and I can specify whether it’s going to stop after a period of time. I should really mow the grass every week, but quite frankly it’s not a job I particularly enjoy so I’m going to make it every two weeks on a Saturday. I’m going to Start this Saturday and no End Date would make it recur forever. The grass isn’t really like that. It stops growing around about October time. So I’m going to say I’m going to stop doing it, let’s say the end of October. I very rarely need to cut the grass after that. Click on OK, Save, and Close, and that Task is now setup as a Recurring Task. And I’ll show you exactly what that means in just a moment. Now to explain what actually happens with Recurring Tasks, I’m going to take a little look at my Calendar for just a moment. If I click on Calendar and look at my week, if I look at Saturday, this coming Saturday I can see my Task Mow the lawn. Sometimes when you’re looking at this sort of display, you only see the first few characters of a Task name, for instance. Hover over it and you get the Tool Tip just to help you out, Mow the lawn. Now if I move forward to two weeks later when it should be there on the next Saturday, it’s not there. So let’s go back to our Task.

Let’s double click and let’s suppose that it’s Saturday and I’ve actually completed

mowing the lawn. Click on Save and Close, there we are. But the Task doesn’t disappear from my list; the Due Date has just changed. Let me go back to the Calendar again. Go forward again from Saturday, the Task has disappeared from Saturday because I completed it. Go forward to the 24th and there it is. So Outlook is actually producing a new version of that each time and the next version, the next occurrence of Mowing the lawn is always visible in my schedule.

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Learn Outlook 2010 Finally, in this section, I’m going to talk about two other useful features of Recurring Tasks. Let’s stick with my Mowing the lawn and one of them is here. If on a particular occasion for a Recurring Task I’m not going to complete it, perhaps it rains on the day. I can actually Skip an occurrence. If I just click Skip Occurrence, it will not mark the particular occurrence of that Task as Complete; it would just Delete it altogether. It will have never happened, and it will reschedule according to the recurrence pattern. That’s sometimes useful. In relation to mowing the grass though, if we Skip an occurrence of mowing the grass it tends to get a bit on the long side. So when we were setting up the Recurrence pattern for mowing the grass we might well have better been advised to use this option, Regenerate. Now what the Regenerate option does is this. We can schedule a first occurrence say of Mowing the lawn and then we can say that when I’ve marked it as complete Regenerate a New Task for two weeks later. So if I’m late mowing the lawn, if I missed my Saturday date by three or four days because of the weather, for example, it wouldn’t actually stick to the schedule of being two weeks later, Saturday two weeks later. It would reschedule for two weeks after the date that I actually completed the Task. That can be very useful in something like Mowing the lawn; worth knowing about.

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Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Calendar Displays, Set Up/Edit/Delete Appointments Toby: Now we’re going to have a look at the Calendar in more detail. You may remember how to switch from any View to the Calendar View. Bear in mind that Calendar is the second Module on our list here and to switch between the main Modules of Outlook we use Control and the number, in this case 2. So Control and 2 brings up Calendar View. I have a number of options in terms of what’s displayed in the center there. I’m currently on Day. On the right, I have the To-Do Bar; on the left, I have the Navigation Pane. You may remember when we looked at this before that this Calendar Control, the Date Picker as it’s sometimes called, was on the left and now it’s over on the right. There’s a reason for this. When the To-Do Bar is Maximized the Date Picker is here. If I Minimize the To-Do Bar the Date Picker reappears on the left. The main way to move around the Calendar is to click on Dates in the Date Picker, pretty straightforward. And when I’ve clicked on a Date if I’ve got Day View I have my Appointments for the day. That’s currently a very quiet day and below that a list of Tasks to complete. I can always come back to today by clicking on Today and you can see I have no Appointments today but I’ve got a couple of Urgent Tasks there that need attention. As an alternative to Day View, I can look at Work Week View. In my case, the working week is Monday to Friday. Or Week View which gives the full seven day week. Or Month View and the Month View there are different levels of detail. Show Low Detail, Medium Detail, High Detail. We’ll look at those later on. So, to get back to today I’ve always got the Today button. On this occasion today is the 9th of July. If I’ve got a Week View in place then the week shown is the one that includes the 9th of July, so that’s today with a highlight at the top. One of the things you’ll be doing a lot with the Calendar is moving about from day to day and the main way to do that is to use this Date Picker and the arrows take us through the schedule a day, a month at a time. And so if I’m in November I can go a day at a time like this and always go back to today with the Today button. There is another way of moving to a new date and that’s to use the Go To Date Dialog which you bring up by Control and G. And if I want to go to a particular date rather than stepping through either days or months on the Date Picker, I can merely select the Date here. What about the 9th of July next year, which is on a Saturday? Click on OK and there I am. And I’ve got the week that includes the 9th of July 2011. Back to today with the Today button. And one other very useful feature of the Go To Date which not a lot of people know

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Learn Outlook 2010 about. If I bring up Go To Date again, Control-G, you don’t actually have to put a Date in here or indeed use the Date Picker. You can actually put free Text in. So what about 70 days from now? It’s the 9th of July, click on OK. That’s the 17th of September, which I think is pretty clever. So I’ve covered some basic ideas of how to move around the Calendar and a few more of those are going to appear as we look at setting up Appointments. For a very simple way of adding an Appointment to my Calendar, if I know a particular event is going to happen on a particular day at a particular time I can just go straight to that date and schedule that event. So, for instance, I know that on the first Friday in August I’m going to take my mother out to lunch. If you look at the Date Picker Control here, these little arrows take me a month at a time. So August, the first Friday is the 6th. I can go straight to that date and it’s normally 12:30, there. If I double click on that it brings up an Appointment Dialog. That’s where she likes to go. We normally have lunch about 12:30 to 2:30. I could actually send her details of this Appointment, but she’s not quite got to grips with Email yet. So I’m just really putting this in my Outlook for me. So that’s what you might call again a quick and dirty way of putting an Appointment into my Calendar. Okay, that’s a very quick way of scheduling an Appointment. Now let’s do things a little bit more formally. I’ve just had a call from one of my colleagues whose arranged a couple of meetings for me with one of our contacts, a man called William H. and we’re actually giving him some advice on a policy wording for our local council. So I’m meeting him at the local town hall a couple of times; next Thursday at 10 in the morning and then a couple of weeks after that. So I’m going to schedule those two Appointments. If you remember talking about Recurring Tasks you might be tempted to think perhaps these are Recurring Appointments, but there’s only two of them and so I’m going to treat them as two separate Appointments and we’ll worry about Recurring Appointments later. So let me go back to Today, just to get my bearings. So next Thursday it was the 8th yesterday, so next Thursday will be the 15th, 10 in the morning, Open up a Dialog. The Subject is Meeting with William H. It’s at Richmond Town Hall. That’s going to be about an hour and a half, let’s make it two hours because we always have a coffee afterwards. And okay that’s that one. And then I’m going to for two weeks after that, which will be the 29 th, same thing, 10 o’clock meeting with William H. Now before I type the location again just look at this little drop down on the right of Location. This actually keeps a record of the locations © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 I’ve typed; a neat way of reusing things. I’ll make that 10 to 12 as well. And actually I meant to put a note in here to say what it’s about. It’s to discuss the draft council, oops, policy wording. I will put that in the other one. So I’ll Copy that, click Save, and go back to my previous Appointment on the 15th. To Edit an Appointment that I’ve already Created, double click opens it up, I can Paste something in, Save and Close and I’m done. Well, I’m sure you know how it is with these things. No sooner had I scheduled those two meetings than I’ve had a call from William to say that he needs to change both of them. The first one needs to go to the day before and the second one needs to go to the day after. So let’s go in and see how we change an Appointment, Edit an Appointment. The first one was on Thursday the 15th. There it is. If I double click the Appointment, it opens up the Appointment Dialog and it’s quite easy to change the Start Date and Time, End Date and Time. Use the Date Picker on the Start Time and change from Thursday the 15th to Wednesday the 14th. What Outlook does is it tries to keep the meeting the same. So it still thinks it’s a two hour meeting, so it’s changed the End Date as well, which is absolutely fine because that’s what I want. So Save and Close. The first one is fixed. Now go to the second one where obviously I could do the same thing moving it to Friday. But actually I’m going to do this differently because a very nice feature of Outlook Calendar is that if you’ve got an Appointment, you can actually Drag it to a different location. So I can Drag it to Friday 10 to 12 and Outlook updates the Date and Time of the Appointment for me. The other thing about moving this to a Friday is that if we have a meeting on a Friday, we always have an extra hour and we go to the local wine bar for a light lunch, as it’s a Friday. And I need to make the Appointment an hour longer to accommodate that. If I click on the Appointment and bring up the Border I can grab the lower Border and make it a three hour Appointment. That’s all you need to do. You don’t need to Open the Dialog, but I’m going to Open the Dialog now just to see the effect of that. And you can see it’s changed the Start Date and Time from Thursday to Friday and it’s made its meeting from 10 until 1 in the afternoon. So you can actually change Dates, Times, and Durations of meetings by Dragging them about on the Calendar. You won’t be surprised to learn that you can also do that by Cut and Paste, Copy and Paste, and so on, which we’ll be doing a little bit of in a few minutes time. We’re going to end our first detailed look at using the Outlook 2010 Calendar by finding out how to Delete an Appointment. My mother’s just phoned to say that she can’t manage lunch on © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 the first Friday in August after all. She’s not quite sure when she can reschedule it for at the moment because she leads a pretty busy life. So I’m going to go to that lunch meeting, which was on Friday the 6th and I basically want to Delete it. There are actually a few ways of Deleting an Appointment. One way is to Open the Appointment up and there is actually a Delete button there which I could press. You may also notice if I hover Delete that there is a shortcut, ControlD. The other way, which is very worth knowing about is with any Calendar Appointment, if you right click you have a number of optional Commands that you can perform. You can make it a Private Appointment, significance of that will become apparent later on. You have a Delete option and you have options such as Invite Attendees in Quick Print. I’m going to just press Delete. So that’s it. We’ve seen how to Add Appointments, make changes to Appointments including moving the day and changing the Time, and we’ve seen how to Delete Appointments. We’re going to come back to Appointments in a while and add some more detail to what we’ve seen already, but let’s now take a look at Contacts.

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Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Using Help Options; Add/Edit/Delete Contacts Toby: Welcome back. It’s time to take a look at Contacts, but before we do let’s just have a quick look at getting access to Help with Outlook 2010. Within the Office 2010 Suite of programs the way to accessing Help is consistent and there are basically two ways in each of the elements of the package. The first way is to use the little white question mark on a blue background, that button in the top right hand corner of the screen, and if you’re connected to the internet that will bring up Office online Help. If you look at this Outlook Help, in this case, Box, you can see a number of options. There’s a Getting Started option which will help you to learn the basic, how to work in a different language, and help on the various Keyboard Shortcuts that are available. All three of these can be extremely useful. There’s also a particular help on Attachments, Calendar, some Demos, and personalizing your Copy and so on. The help that most people use most of the time though is Search. So, for instance, if we wanted help on the Calendar, the last topic that we looked at on this course. Type the word Calendar, hit the Enter key, and you’re presented with a list of Help Topics related to the Calendar. There may be more than one page of these so there’s a Back and Next Control here. If I choose a particular Help Topic such as Create View or Delete a Calendar Group, click on that, it’s a Hyperlink. It takes me through to a page with some detailed help on that particular topic. And within that page there will in turn be Hyperlinks to other pages within the Help system. And then there’s a Home facility, back to the Search and so on. The second way of bringing up Help, again common throughout the Office 2010 Suite of programs, is to press the F1 key. You get exactly the same effect and it’s as straightforward as that. By now you should be familiar with switching between the main Modules of Outlook 2010. So to look at Contacts, we need Control and 3 as our Keyboard Shortcut. And that takes us to the Contacts View. I currently have the To-Do Bar Minimized on the right. I have a couple of Lists here that I’m going to look at a bit later on. In the center I have the Information Viewer has some Business Cards for a half a dozen Contacts that are already in my List. We saw earlier that there are a number of optional Views and one optional View, which we can Scroll to here is the List View. I’ve got only seven or eight Contacts in my List at the moment. There their names are. Near the top is a Row in which I can do what we now realize is always available, which is a sort of quick and dirty way of doing something. If I wanted to put a Contact in my List now I © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 can literally type the name in here and say Jane Smith who works for, there’s the name of the Company, and it’s as simple as that. And that’s all I’ve got. Jane Smith now appears in my Contact List. That is the quick and dirty way of adding a Contact. So that’s a very quick way of adding a Contact in that very limited detail of a Contact. There are actually many ways of adding Contacts to our Address Book in Outlook 2010 and we’re going to be looking at most of those as we work our way through the course. But now we’re going to look at what might loosely be called the proper way of doing it, which is to invoke the New Contact Dialog. There’s a button on the left of the Ribbon for New Contact or we can use Control-N which brings up the Dialog. We saw this Dialog earlier on and I pointed out that virtually everything on this is optional; although, of course, it wouldn’t make a lot of sense if you didn’t have either a person’s name or a Company name on here. So what I’m going to do is I’m going to put the details of a real person on here whose details are very public, available on the internet. I’m going to change one or two things, but basically it’s a real person. And first of all, I’m going to put their name in. I could just type the name here, but in terms of structure and searching for names later on it’s better to use this little Check Full Name Dialog. His name, I’m going to change slightly, is Mr. Mike, last name is Brown. And the Company he works for is called Friendship Motors. Spelling mistake. Friendship Motors. And he’s the Sales Manager. And I’ve got his Business Phone Number here, which is 0844 472 3435. And I’ve got his Address here. Now I could just type his Business Address into this box, but again as with the full name, to get structure we can use this little Check Address Dialog where I can put the proper address in, the Street Address. And the Country is United Kingdom. There we are, that’s the Business Address. And, in fact, I’ve got a Photo that I can include as well. There we are. So that’s a much more realistic amount of information to be useful about somebody. I haven’t put a Web Address or an Email Address in there yet. I’ll be adding those later on. But there’s the basic information, including a Photo. When I’ve entered all of the information that I have I click on Save and Close. And one very interesting thing here is if we change the View back and look at Business Card View again, we can see how his Business Card View is really coming along rather well. Of course, once I’ve added a Contact to my Address Book, I may well need to change the information, and over time most people will change a Phone Number or find out more about © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 them. So, supposing I’ve got a few more details about Jane Smith, the Contact I entered earlier in the sort of very quick method. Double click on the entry here. I’ve now got a Job Title for Jane.

She

is

a

Sales

Administrator.

I’ve

got

an

Email

Address

for

her,

[email protected] I’ve got a Business Phone Number for her which is 0844 677 3234. Save that, Save and Close, and there we are, that’s Jane’s details updated, which is pretty straightforward. The other thing which, of course, is extremely straightforward is if I actually wanted to Delete one of these Contacts. I’ve got a number of options. Say I was going to get rid of John Doe who’s a fictitious person I added earlier on. Select John Doe, I’ve got a Delete button there or I can use the Keyboard Shortcut Control and D. Or I can Open up the Contact Details and there’s a nice Delete button there. So a number of ways of Deleting a Contact. As the number of Contacts have information about increases it becomes more and more important to be able to Filter our Views of our Contacts. It makes it easier to find particular people, people representing Companies, and so on. So as we look at each of the Contact Views we have, we may want to improve them or make them more suitable for our purposes. This particular View of Contacts, the List View, it’s quite a straightforward one. I have a number of Columns with information about each of my Contacts. But I may not particularly like the order of those Columns or exactly which ones are shown. This is quite an easy View to Customize. For instance, if I wanted to put the Business Phone Number next to the person’s name it really is very straightforward, I just grab the Heading and pull it into position. And I now see the Business Phone Numbers appearing to the right of the names. I’ve got a number of other Fields over here, Fax Number, Home Phone, Mobile Phone Number, Email, and so on, and I could Drag each of those into the sequence that suits me. So finally on this little section about Contacts we’re going to look at a particularly useful little feature and I’m going to demonstrate it with the guy whose details I entered earlier, Mike Brown. And he’s somebody who helps look after my car and I’m going to give him a call next week about arranging a service. So if I’d wanted to just record the fact that I want to give him a call I can actually use a Follow-up Flag here and say, for instance, Follow-up next week. Click on that there, click on Save and Close. Expand the To-Do Bar here and you’ll see that I’ve now got a Follow-up entry for him which will remind me next week to give Mike a call. I did that by Opening the Contact. I didn’t actually need to do that because if I just look at the Contact in List © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 View, let’s demonstrate it with Jane here. If I right click on a Contact, I have a number of options. So, for instance, I could Delete that Contact. I could Categorize that Contact according to the scheme we’ve already put in place, Urgent, Non-urgent, and so on. I have a facility to actually Call that Contact, which I’ll come back to later. I can Forward the Contact to another person, Print the details, Copy them as a basis for other details, or as I saw just now I can make a Follow-up Reminder and add them to my set of Reminders for next week. So that’s it, that’s our first brief look at the basics of Contacts. We’re going to look at those in more detail later on.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Create, Edit, Forward Notes Toby: Welcome back. In this section, we’re going to look at Notes. We looked at Notes briefly before and we compared them to the Yellow Post-it Notes that are a feature of so many offices or that you might even use at home. Outlook 2010 uses Notes in pretty much the same way, as quick reminders of a particular fact or a particular commitment when we don’t particularly want to create an Appointment or a Task, we just want to make a quick Note of something. To keep things simple there’s also a very simple way of creating a Note and that’s to use the Keyboard Shortcut Control, Shift, and N which brings up an Empty Note. The Note has a Date and Time on it so we can always remember when we created the Note. But unlike other Objects in Outlook 2010 such as Tasks and Appointments, there’s no OK button or Cancel button and there are no sort of drop downs or Text Boxes. It’s literally just like a Yellow Sticky Note, you just type on it. So I could write something like: The keys are in the drawer. And that’s it. To Save that I literally click on the Close button and my Note is Saved. If I want to see my Notes, including any that I made earlier, I want to go to the Notes Module and that will be Control and 5 or click there. And there are all of my Notes, including the one that I made earlier. The other main way of creating a Note is to use the New Note button on the Ribbon. Click on there. Exactly the same thing happens, I have an Empty Note with the Date and Time on it and I can type my Reminder such as that’s an important one for today. Now if I leave that Open and go to say the Calendar to do something else or my Task List to do something else, obviously you can’t see that Note, but if I go down to the Task Bar at the bottom of the screen and hover over the Outlook icon. This is obviously a Windows 7 thing. It will be different on XP or on Windows Vista. I can see any Open Notes and in fact it’s a good way of remembering I’ve got something to do. If you look at the Outlook icon down the bottom here you can see there are multiple pages behind it and it’s a good way of just leaving a little Note like that. If I now Close that Note and in fact I think I’ll Close that one as well, go back to Notes, and they’re both just sitting there in my Display. Reading an existing Note is straightforward. Select the Notes Module if you’re not already in it, go to the Information Viewer in the middle, there’s all the Notes, double click the one you want to read, and it Opens up. If you have a lot of Text in the Note it may help you to make it bigger;

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 something you can’t actually do with the paper ones. To do that hover the mouse on the bottom right hand corner of the Note, left mouse button, and you can Drag it out to pretty much any size that you want. And when you’ve Dragged it out Close it, just Open it up again, and you’ll see that it maintains that size. This can be pretty useful if you have a Note with a lot of content. And here’s another interesting parallel with the Yellow Post-it Notes. If you look at the Notes we’ve got already, we can actually treat the Information Viewer in the center of the screen a bit like the side of the fridge really and we can move our Notes around in any way we want; perhaps Group them together, put them in some kind of order. That’s partly because we have the Notes in Icon View, which is one of the current View options on the Ribbon when we’re looking at Notes. There are two other Views, one of which is Notes List View which basically gives us, as the name implies, a list of the Notes and part of each Note. And the other option which is pretty useful is a Last 7 Days View which shows us the Notes that we’ve Added or Edited in the last seven days. I’m going to go back to Icon View, but the others are quite a useful way of seeing a little bit more information about each Note. So having looked at Creating and Reading Notes, changing the Size, moving them around, the different Views, let’s look at a couple of the other things that we need to be able to do. Open up again to Change a Note I literally just change the content. And when I do change a Note the Time or Date for that matter on the bottom changes and this will show either the Time and Date that the Note was Created if I haven’t change it or if I do change it, it gives me the Date and Time it was last changed. If I Close this Note and right click on it I can also see some other options, a couple of which I’m going to come back to in a moment, one of them is Delete, and note also that there’s a Delete option on the Ribbon. Let’s look at one or two other useful things that we need to be able to do with Notes. When you’ve built up a lot of Notes, you may get to a point that you can’t find a particular piece of information. It’s a bit like staring at the size of the fridge and all the things stuck on it and saying, which one of those has got the shopping list on it? Or whatever it may be. There is a Search facility. If you look above the List of Notes here and I can type in a word or phrase here to find a particular Note. In my case, I know there’s a Note about something that Pete has got to do, but I can’t remember what it is. So if I type in the word Peter I don’t even have to press

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Learn Outlook 2010 Enter or the Magnifier on the right, it comes up with the Note which has got the word Peter in it, List of Invoices that Peter needs to check. That’s pretty handy as well. Now let’s look at one of the other useful things to be able to do with a Note. Sometimes you’ll want to Forward a Note to somebody else. I’m going to choose the last one there, select it, and I can either from the right click Menu do Forward or from the Ribbon, Forward. And it enables me to Forward by Email that Note. I’m going to Forward it to myself so that we can see exactly what happens. One of my other Email Addresses, click on Send, and away it goes. And while that’s going through the pipes, one other thing I can do with any Note here, right click, and Quick Print. Assuming I’ve got Printer setup correctly, Quick Print will quickly print that Note out for me. Okay, so in the time that we’ve been doing that some Mail has arrived. I’ll have a look at that. Select Mail, go to this Account, and on the Inbox, there we are. There it is. I’ve received an Email with a Note in it. If I double click on the Note I get exactly the same Note. It’s quite a useful feature to be able to Forward a Note to somebody else in your own Company, somebody outside your Company, somebody at home, or whatever. That’s a pretty useful feature and another very useful feature of Notes is if I go back to the Notes Module, if I’ve got a particular Note like this one that I consider to be important or maybe phoning my mom is the most important one of all, if I right click on that I can Categorize the Note, and Urgent is that one. Click on Urgent and not only does the Note get Categorized, but the Color of the Note itself changes to the red color that I’m using for Urgent. So, that’s a useful feature as well. We’re going to finish this look at Notes by looking at some of the options that we can set via Backstage View. So, go to Backstage View as usual, click on Options. Within Options there’s a section on Notes and Journal, click there, and there’s only a few options to set. One of them is to choose a Default Color which most people have set at yellow, but you have a choice. Default Size for the icon. We’ve got it set at Medium, but you can have a Small icon or a Large icon. Font is 11 point Calibri and you can choose whether or not to show the Date and Time and Note was last modified. So, they’re the options available. I’ll leave them as they are, so click Cancel here and certainly for the moment that just about covers us for Notes.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Options, Create, Send Journal Entries Toby: Hello again. We mentioned earlier the Outlook Journal, and in this section, we’re going to look at the Journal in more detail. The Journal has two main methods of operation. One is Automatic Operation whereby we switch it On and pretty much leave it to its own devices. The other method of Operation is that we can Manually make Journal entries. Let’s look at the first option first. To switch the Journal On go to Backstage View, go to Options, select Notes and Journal. We’ve already looked at the Notes Options here, now we look at the Journal Options. And we have a number of selections here. The first selection is which types of Item we want to Journal; Email Messages, Meeting Requests, Task Requests, and so on. I’m going to check Email Messages for the moment.

Secondly we can select which Contacts we want Items

Journaled for. And I’m just going to check them for Mr. Larry Ross, my friend. And we can also Record Files transferred from Access, Excel, PowerPoint, Word; I’m going to leave that unchecked at the moment. There is also another Dialog that we Open up from here, Auto Archive Journal Entries. I’m going to come back to that a little bit later on. So for now I’ve switched On Journaling, let’s see what happens if I Send an Email to my friend Larry Ross. Okay, let’s Close these down, click on OK in both cases, and Send an Email. To, let’s start typing. There we are; his name comes up straightaway. And Send the Message. So the Email Message has been Sent. Let’s now see the Journal Entry that tells us that this has happened. The Journal doesn’t have its own Module Entry in this List, so we have to go to the Folder List. And when you click on Folder List and look at the list of Folders further up there’s the Journal. Click on the Folder and what you see with this particular View of the Journal is a Timeline going across there and against each day Journal Entries. This particular Journal Entry is the one we’re looking for. Journal Test Entry Sent. Double click it to Open up and it tells us what the Entry actually consisted of. It was an Email Message. It tells us there. The Subject of the Email Message is there and provided I’ve kept a Copy, I can Open that up and have a look at what it said. Most importantly it gives me the Time that it was Sent on the Date specified. The Duration is an interesting Field that we’ll look back at in a moment. But, for now, that’s the very simplest sort of Journal Entry.

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Learn Outlook 2010 When viewing the Journal we have a number of options. We can see here the Journal for today, the 15th of July 2010. But we can also look at a Week View or a Month View. With all of these Views the Timeline runs along here and the Journal Entries are visible here. Depending on the number of Journal Entry types we have, we switched On Email Message and Meeting Requests, we may have several lines of Journal Entries down here. This View is not the only available View. There is another one which is the Entry List View where the Journal Entries are shown in sequence and we also have a Last 7 Days version of that which shows us the Entries for the last seven days. In Entry List View, we can actually Sort by whichever Headings we have here; Dates, Contact Names, and so on. And in here we have a Search facility. So we’ve looked at some of the options for Creating Journal Entries Automatically. Let’s now Create a couple of Journal Entries Manually. One of the simplest ways is while we’re looking at the Journal to use the Journal Entry button on the left of the Ribbon; this brings up a straightforward Dialog and we can type in a Subject. We can choose the type of Activity, which might be Phone Call, Task, Working on a document, something to do with a meeting, Email Message, and so on. So, for instance, we could just say a Letter say and we could say, let’s say Receipt of Invitation to Open Day Event, and that’s a straightforward Journal Entry. A little bit more Linkage within Outlook 2010 though can make the Journaling facility really quite powerful. And I’m just going to demonstrate one example of that now. You may remember that I’ve got a Phone Mark Brown. I mentioned it earlier. I’m going to Phone him now and in order to do that I’ve got to find his Phone Number. So Open up Contacts, there he is, Mike Brown. And there’s his Phone Number which is fine, but if you look on the Dialog here in this Ribbon of options and look under More, there’s an Option that says Journal Entry. I can now make a Journal Entry for the Phone Call that I am about to make. In fact, I’m going to pretend I’ve just made the Phone Call and I’m going to type in the Text of the Phone Call here. Mike said he will find out when they can service my car. I can, in fact, put in here a Duration, say, it was a 10 minute conversation, and Save and Close on that. We’ll take a look at look at that in a moment, but something for future reference is that you can actually Link this through is you can dial phone numbers directly from Outlook; such that it will actually Create Journal Entries virtually Automatically on the basis of a Phone Call dialed through a Contact in Outlook. We’re not going to look at that at the moment, but the principle of it is the same as the one that we’ve just done. So let’s do a Save and Close. Let’s go back to the Folder List, back to the Journal, and we © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 can already see now that we have a Phone Call Logged. Open up the detail and there we are. The option on the Bar here, Phone Calls, also shows only Phone Calls. Let’s look at one other Manual Journaling Option. This is another very straightforward one and one that I think you’ll find very useful. If I go back to my Calendar and find an Appointment, say, there’s one. Let’s just, there we are, that dinner Appointment. Click on the Folder List so that I can see the Journal. I can actually take this Appointment, click with the mouse, left click, and Drag it into the Journal. Drop it in the Journal like that. It allows me to Add a Comment. And, in fact, if this was say a Business Meeting I could Record the actual Duration here. It Defaults to the scheduled Duration for the Appointment anyway. Save and Close. Back to the Journal. Entry List and here, there’s our Entry there. So we’ve seen three ways of making Manual Journal Entries. One is to invoke the Dialog from the Journal Entry button here, another is from a Contact. We can actually invoke a Journal Entry. And another one is to Drag an Item, a Task, or an Appointment or whatever or an Email into the Journal in the way that you’ve just seen. We have a couple of options for Printing Journal Entries. If we say select these three, click on File to go into Backstage View, go to Print. Then we’re presented with two options, Table Style and Memo Style. Table Style basically Prints the Journal a line at a time, pretty much like the Display you can see on the screen. Memo Style Prints the Detail of each Journal Entry for the ones we’ve selected. So we’ve selected three. This is one of three here and this will Print whatever level of Detail we’ve got for each of those Journal Entries. So that’s a useful thing to be able to do to Print each of those. And one final point on the Journal for now is if you use it quite a bit you may be rather irritated that you can’t quickly flick to it down here. Well, in fact, you can, because if you go to the bottom of the Navigation Pane, that little arrow there, right click, Navigation Pane Options, low and behold you can click on Journal, click on OK, and you have an Entry. You’ve got to Drag this up a little bit so that you can see it, but it is there right at the bottom. The reason it’s not there by Default is to try to keep as much space available in the top of the Navigation Bar as possible. Clearly you could disable these others using that same approach if you felt you needed a bit more space at the top. So, that’s it on the Journal for now. It’s a very useful feature that’s probably quite underused by most people.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010

Chapter 2 – Beyond the Basics Video: Customize Quick Access Toolbar & the Ribbon Toby: In this section and the next one we’re going to look at the Microsoft Outlook 2010 Workspace in quite a bit more detail. We’re going to start by looking at the Quick Access Toolbar which is a feature of Office 2010 in general and not just of Outlook. The Quick Access Toolbar normally lives in the top left hand corner of each of the screens of each of the applications in Office 2010, and its main purpose is to give the User a quick way of accessing Commands that they use quite a bit. It can save time because it stops you having to either search around for a Command you can’t find or to keep clicking between the Tabs on the Ribbon. You can add quite a wide range of Command buttons to the Quick Access Toolbar. If we click on the drop down to the right of it here we can see a list of some of those Commands now. And two of them are checked, Send/Receive Old Folders and Undo. And if you look at my Quick Access Toolbar, there’s the Send/Receive Folders button, there’s the Undo button. The Undo button is grayed because I haven’t actually done anything in this session yet, so there’s nothing to Undo. If I wanted to switch On one of the other Commands, such as Forward, click it to check and there’s a Forward button. Similarly click on Print, there’s a Print button. But in fact the Customization, the button, can be far more extensive than that. If I click this drop down again and go to More Commands not only does it list the Commands that you saw just now on that Menu, but it enables me to choose from All Commands, all the Commands available in Outlook 2010 or just Commands that are not in the Ribbon. So, for instance, if I wanted to put a button on for About, I could Add that. That would appear on my Quick Access Toolbar. So there it is, click on that, brings up the About Dialog. That’s probably not one of the Commands that I’d want easily available and at hand. So if I go back into More Commands I can easily Remove it from the Toolbar again. So Customizing that Toolbar is really very straightforward. So we can Customize the Quick Access Toolbar quite easily. Going back to the drop down next to the Bar, the one Item we didn’t look at there was Show Below the Ribbon which enables us to move the Bar below the Ribbon and correspondingly to put it above the Ribbon. The Ribbon is what we’re going to look at next because this can also be Customized. If you look at the Ribbon I’ve got now, which is here, I have four Tabs: Home, Send/Receive, Folder, and View. And © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 exactly what is on each of these depends on which Module I’m in. I’m in Mail at the moment, so you can see the Home Tab for Mail. Look at the Home Tab for Calendar, it’s completely different. When we Customize the Quick Access Toolbar we went down to More Commands and that took us into Backstage View. And it’s actually Backstage View that we’re going to use to Customize the Ribbon. So, click on File, take me into Backstage View, click on Options, and then click on Customize Ribbon. And what I have here is the current definition of what is on the Ribbon and we’re going to look at that now. So that we can start to look at Customizing the Ribbon in some detail, let’s go back to the Mail Home Tab and look at what’s actually on that Tab. The buttons that are on it are in Groups. There’s a New Group, a Delete Group, a Respond Group, Quick Steps, and so on. And if we look at one of the Groups, say New, we can see it’s got two buttons in it, New Email and New Items. Let’s click on File to go back into Backstage View, go to Options, Customize Ribbon. We’ve got here the Home Tab for Mail and we can see that same set of Groups: New, Delete, Respond, Quick Steps, Move, and so on. If I Open up the New Group by pressing on the Plus symbol next to it, I’ve got New Item and New Items which are the two buttons that are currently in that Group. I could actually Remove one of those Items from the Group if I wanted to. I can move Items between Groups and I can Add Items. I can Add a whole New Group. I can Add a whole new Tab. So let’s have a look at one or two of those options. I’m going to start with a very simple change to my Ribbon. I’m going to Add a New Group and all I’m going to do is put a very simple button in it just to demonstrate the principle. I think I’m going to put it on the Home Tab and I’m going to put it after New. So if I select New, which was the Group on the left. If I start by clicking on New Group here, a New Group is added. It’s got the name of Custom because it’s a Custom Group; one I’m actually making myself to my own design. First thing I’m going to do is to Rename it. I’m going to call it Toby Test and choose a button. Let’s go for that one. Click on OK. Now I’m going to put a Command in it. There are a number of Command Lists. As with Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar you have a number of options for displaying different Commands that are available. I’m going to go for Commands not in the Ribbon. That means that ones that aren’t on it already. And let’s just choose the first one, which is About. This actually is a button which will tell us about the version of Outlook we’re using. So not particularly exciting, but it will certainly demonstrate the © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 principle. So let me Drag About over there and put it into my New Group. There it is. If I now click on OK, you can see what happens. Bar’s the same but to the right of the New Group I’ve got a New Group called Toby Test. And if I click on the single button in that Group About Microsoft Outlook it comes up with the About Microsoft Outlook Dialog that tells me which version I’m using and so on. So Adding a Group and a button, it really is as simple as that. So having Customized the Ribbon and Added our New Group, let’s make a further change. So back into Backstage View, Options, Customize Ribbon. There’s our New Group over there. Let’s Add another Command. Let’s Add Check for Updates. There we are. And I’m going to now try to Add another Command, in this case, I’m going to Add Calendar. Okay. And in addition, I’m going to select the Group and I’m going to move it down. Now note what happens. It was to the right of New or just below it in this list. I’ve moved it below Respond so it should now appear to the right of Respond. Click on OK and there we are. Now when, on the Ribbon, Outlook is trying to position my New Group, if it doesn’t have room to use the big buttons it uses smaller buttons and just put Text next to them. Of course, you still get Tool Tips over each of the buttons and there we are. There is my Customized Ribbon. Let’s look at a further Customization of the Ribbon now. There’s my New Group, Toby Test. Back into Backstage View, etc. Instead of Adding a New Group, this time I’m going to Add a New Tab. Click on New Tab. It appears there and I can Rename it. I’m going to call my Tab Toby. And what I’m going to do is to actually move my Custom Group on to the New Tab. When the New Tab was created Outlook by Default added a New Group. I’m going to Remove this particular New Group. I haven’t got anything in it so I’m going to Remove it. And let’s see what that does. There we are. I now have a whole Tab to myself. The original Home Tab is back with the content it had before. Click on Toby. There’s my New Tab with my New Group. Outlooks got plenty of room now, so it can use nice big buttons for my New Group. In the next section, we’re going to look at some of the Views that are available in Outlook 2010.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Customizing the Workspace Views Part 1 Toby: Welcome back. In this section, we’re going to continue to look at the Outlook 2010 Workspace in more detail. And we’re going to spend quite a bit of time to begin with looking at Views. When people use Outlook they often don’t think in terms of the Views that they can see, but in fact the Views are very important. And although they are different, depending on the Module that we’re using, such as the Calendar or Email, they do share quite a lot of features in common. And learning about those features can help us to use Outlook more productively. When I’m in Mail View, for instance, I have as we’ve seen the To-Do Bar on the right, the Navigation Bar on the left, and in the middle the Content of the Information Viewer which when I’m looking at Mail depends on what I’ve got selected on the left. So, for instance, I have now selected an Inbox with no Messages in it so it looks pretty empty. But if I select an Inbox which has got Messages in it then whichever Message I select is on the left hand half of the Information Viewer. I can see the Message itself in the right hand half. If I switch to Calendar View I have, at the moment, a Daily Calendar. But as we’ve seen earlier I could change that to my Week Work Calendar and so on. So let’s look at some of the features that these Views have in common and let’s try to learn how to do a little bit more with them. One of the most common features of Views is a Table View. Almost all elements of Outlook 2010 have a Table View. For instance, if we go to the Contacts Module, we have a List View which is actually an example of a Table View. And the features are common. There’s a set of Columns, each Column has a Header, and as you can see here the Rows in the Table are effectively Categorized according to, in this case, Company. Let’s see how all that works in a bit more detail. So, let’s continue with the List View in Contacts. Each Row in this View is one of my Contacts. Mrs. Tina Androtti, Mr. Mike Brown, and so on. Each Column is one Attribute of that Contact; one piece of information about a person. So in this Column I have Full Names, in this Column I have Job Titles, and so on. It’s quite straightforward to Customize this View and let’s start by adding a New Column to the visible View. One easy way of doing that is to right click on the Header of a Column, say the Job Title Column, and go to Fields Chooser. And what this does is to display a list of the available pieces of information about each contact and I can choose which of those pieces of information I would like to show in my List View. I’m going to show, say, their Last Name. In order to do that, I click on that and literally Drag that to the Header into the © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 position I want, and that will then drop Last Name into my Table. Notice how it’s got it a little bit too small. I can’t see the whole of each Field. It’s easy to change the width of a Column because literally I hover over either the right or the left edge of the Header until I get that vertical bar with the two arrows and then Drag it to the size that I want. There we are. I’ve now added a Last Name Column to my View. We saw earlier on how to Move Columns about. So, for instance, if I wanted to put Job Title somewhere else grab it and Drag it. That’s straightforward enough as well. And finally, if I want to actually Delete one of the Columns, I can just right click and click on Remove this Column. It’s important to note that this doesn’t actually Delete any information about that person from my Contacts. It just means the Column is no longer visible in this List View. And one point now to remember is the List View has actually got a lot more Columns than you can actually see. And if you use the Slider at the bottom of the Display here, you can Scroll through all of the available Columns in this particular List View. So, we’ve seen how to Add Columns to a View, Move the Columns around, and so on. Let’s look at Sorting the Rows in the View. In this Contact View, I have about a dozen Contacts now and they’re actually in Groups according to Company name. I’ll come back to that in a moment. But the order in which they’re displayed is actually not very clear. But you can see from the Headers which Column the View is Sorted on and in fact this is Sorted on Job Title. The little arrow there tells you which Column is being used. Now the direction of the arrow tells you whether it’s Ascending or Descending View. It doesn’t really help very much in this case because we only have two Job Titles and the Sorting will be within these Groups. So, the entries under the Friendship Motors Group will be Sorted in order but there is only one. Similarly Lesterton Motors there is only one. So let’s look at one of the other Columns. Let’s go for Last Name, but there isn’t actually room to see an arrow so let’s just make it a little bit wider. And to Sort on that Column, all you need to do is to click on it and the arrow goes away from the Job Title and onto the Last Name. And you can tell that pointing upwards means it’s Sorted into Ascending alphabetical order as you look down the page; Androtti, Chalama, Doe, and so on. Click again to change direction and now it’s in Descending Order; although, of course, it is within these Groups, within the Company Groups. It’s very easy then to change the Sort Order, but in fact the Sort Order can be on more than one Column. We’re going to be able to use this © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 later on in a more full list of Table View, but I just briefly show you now how to do that. If I right click anywhere on the Header and click in View Settings, one of the options available in the Advanced View Settings List Dialog is Sort. If I click on that, it actually gives me access to a more complex Dialog where I can choose to Sort on more than one Column. So I could, for instance, Sort on Last Name Descending and then on say Company Ascending. So it will first of all Sort on Last Name and then on Company Name. And I can add other Fields to this Sort and sequence as well. Click on OK. It warns me that one of the Fields I’m Sorting on is not in the View, do I want to show it? Yes I do. Click on OK and now apart from seeing Last Name with the wedge to denote that it’s Sorting on that, if I go along here I’ll find Company right near the end now. It’s just been introduced and let me just stretch that along there. And you can see the wedge there as well. Clearly if I wanted to Move Company to make it visible, I could just Drag it as I did before. But now you can see how I can use more than one Field when I’m Sorting. So, I’ve now got my Contact List Sorted on two Fields, but it’s still quite confusing at the moment because of the Grouping which I mentioned just now. Currently the Contacts are Grouped by Company. I’m going to Remove this Grouping. It’s quite easy to do. Click on any of the Headings, right click, go into View Settings. Look at the Group By option and I’m going to just Clear that. I don’t want any Grouping at all. Click on OK, click on OK, and my Contacts are no longer Grouped. Now if I look at the way the Contacts now appear and the Sort Order, you can see what’s happened. The first Company, given that they’re Sorted into Ascending Company Order, is anybody without a Company Name. So that’s the people where it’s Blank. And within that Company, i.e. no Company, the names are in alphabetical order: Androtti, Chalama, and so on.

Then the Companies are in alphabetical order: Friendship Motors,

Lesterton Motors, and so on. So I now have no Grouping but I have all of my Contacts Sorted by Company Name and then by Last Name. Let’s just look at a couple of other useful features of Groups before we move onto the next section. In order to Sort easily, we saw that we could just click in the Heading to do a Sort on a single Column. For Grouping we can Group easily by merely Dragging the Heading into this top area; that automatically Groups according to whatever the Heading is. And another useful feature is if you look at the names in these three Groups, if you’re particularly interested in a particular Company or a particular Group, you can actually Minimize any of the Groups by © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 pointing on the little arrow there. So if I was only interested in Friendship Motors, I could leave that Open and Close all of the others; another useful little feature. Now in the next section, we’re going to spend a little bit more time looking at Views and some of the other ways that we can take advantage of the many possibilities that Outlook 2010 offers us.

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Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Customizing the Workspace Views Part 2 Toby: Hello again. In this section, we’re going to continue looking at the Outlook 2010 Workspace and I’m going to spend a little bit more time on Table and List View. If I go back to the Contacts Module, I have my Enhanced List of Contacts. I’ve added quite a few more. And we’ve already seen how to change the Columns in the View, Move them around, Add them, how to Sort and Group the View. I’m going to look now at another way of doing that job which is a little bit more compact. If I click on the View Tab on the Ribbon and then go to View Settings, which is the second button from the left, I bring up that Advanced View Settings List Dialog. There are a number of options in there including Sort and Group By. And in fact, there are various options for Formatting the Columns in the View, which we’ll come back to later on. But if I just wanted, for instance, to change the Columns on Display I can click the top button Columns, and this little Dialog gives me a list on the right of the Columns that are currently displayed and the list on the left of Columns that I could Display if I want to. So if I want to introduce a New Column, like Mobile Phone for example, click, Add it to the View. It appears at the bottom of the list, which would make it the extreme right of the View. If I want to put I somewhere else, say, I wanted to put it between Company and Business Phone, I click on Mobile Phone Move Up. It’s now between Company and Business Phone. If I want to Move it down, there’s a Move Down button, but let’s put it there. Click on OK, click on OK again, and there it is. And then I can adjust the width of the Column to Display just the right amount of data. So that View Settings Dialog can be very useful. Let’s just Open it again and we’ve added the Mobile Phone Column. Let’s look at Group By, exactly the same features as before. Let’s say we could Group By Company. That is, of course, an alternative to Dragging the Group into that area as we did before. Sort we’ve got set. So if we click on OK now, there we are; we’re Grouped by Company. Let me Minimize the Group where there is no Company and you can see some of the people and the Contacts I’ve got of those Companies. So if I wanted to focus on Contacts at a particular Company I could do it here. So that’s the Table List View and as we can see if we go to other Modules such as Tasks where we also have a Table List View, including some of the Tasks we talked about before, all of the same rules and all of the same processes and procedures that we’ve just looked at for Contacts apply equally well for Tasks. So if I click on the View Tab within Tasks, I’ve got a View Settings Dialog. I can do all of the same types of © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 thing, everything that’s relevant to Tasks and the mechanics of it are pretty much exactly the same. So that’s pretty much it on the Table and List View for now, but just before we move on let’s just quickly go back to Contacts again. We finished with that View where they’re Grouped by Company and Sorted by Last Name. If I go back to the View Tab and on View Settings reset anything that I need to set, make sure I’m exactly happy with the whole setup, and then go to Change View. I can actually Save this View as effectively a Standard View for my use of Outlook 2010. So I could, for instance, say Save current View as a New View, give it a name. If I call it, say, Company View or better still Toby’s Company View, make it available to all Contact Folders and not just ones that are visible to me. I’ll talk about that in a little while. Click on OK. I’ve now got that as a Saved View and any time I wanted to restore that View, let’s suppose that I’ve gone away somewhere else, gone and looked at mail, come back to Contacts again, click on View again, anytime that I want restore that View it’s on the list there. Toby’s Company View is now on that Change View Menu. So I can click that and it’s applied again from wherever I am. So that’s a useful way once you’ve got a particular View that you like you can Save it and then reuse it anytime that you want. One other very important set of options in Views to be aware of relates to the To-Do Bar and Tasks. If we go back to Tasks, of course, we have the option on go into the View Menu and choosing a particular View that we like, but if we look at Change View here it brings up the same list and there’s actually nearly a dozen different List Views that are available. Now these have very specific functions. So, for instance, there is a Prioritize View which shows all our Tasks in Priority Order. We’ve got some with None and then we’ve got the Urgent ones together. We’ve got the To-Do List which basically puts together To-Do Items not only the Tasks that we’re due to do, but also if we’ve got any Flagged Emails, for instance, they appear here as well. So that’s a good one to show jobs that need doing and then we’ve got another View, an Active View which shows the things that are effectively in progress in some way. So it’s a good idea to experiment with each of these Views to find out which one or ones you find particularly useful. Although Table List View is a very common View within Outlook 2010, there are others. We’ve seen them all before. For instance, in Notes there’s this Icon View which is pretty much peculiar © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 to Notes. There are some situations where you’d show Folders like this, but we won’t come across that for a little while yet. Within the Calendar, of course, we have Calendar View. And within Contacts, we have the Business Card View that we’ve also seen before. Now whichever Module you’re in, if you go to the View Menu, View Tab, click on Change View, you are given a list of the available Views, and, of course, within Contacts one of the available Views is this one, Toby’s Company View, the one that I just created. If I go into Calendar, click on View, the available Views are shown there for me as well. So that’s a good review of the various Views that are available to us within Outlook 2010. So, now let’s look at a couple of other very useful and important aspects of the Outlook 2010 Workspace. We’ve mentioned already a few Keyboard Shortcuts and a lot of people, including me, like to use a whole collection of Keyboard Shortcuts to make their lives easier. For instance, one of the ones I really like is Control-Shift-N which will always bring up an Empty Note. That’s quite useful. I can leave that on the screen hidden behind the Window I’m working on and it just reminds me to do something. And then of course within something, for instance here where I’m looking at Tasks, Control-N brings up a New Task Dialog. So we’ve seen a few of those already. I don’t propose to work my way through all of the available Keyboard Shortcuts now, but it’s a good use of the Help facility. You should recall that we can bring up the Help either by using that little white question mark in a blue circle or just press the F1 key, up comes Help. If I type in Keyboard Shortcuts, here we are. There’s a general one for Office. There we are Keyboard Shortcuts for Microsoft Outlook 2010, click on that, let me just Maximize that, and what we have is the list of all the Keyboard Shortcuts characterized. So, for instance, Basic Navigations, switch to Mail – Control-1, switch to Calendar – Control-2, and so on. As you probably imagine by now there are an awful lot of these Keyboard Shortcuts and you’d be doing extremely well to remember them all, but some people do like a particular Shortcut or a set of Shortcuts that helps them to do their work more effectively. So this is the best place to find out what they all are. You do, of course, also know that in some cases if you have a Tool Tip, you hover over an item, and there is a Shortcut, for instance, New Email the Shortcut is ControlShift-M. You can check Shortcuts by using Tool Tips and if there is a Shortcut it will show you what it is.

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Learn Outlook 2010 There’s one other very important topic related to the Outlook 2010 Workspace and again I’m going to use the Help facility just to point out a good source of information and it’s to do with Accessibility. If I bring up the Help and type in Accessibility, first item there Accessibility features in Microsoft Office 2010. These are facilities that are pretty much across the board and they relate to Backstage View, what Microsoft call the Fluent User Interface which is what we call the Ribbon, and Accessibility Checker which applies more to, for instance, Microsoft Word. So if you’d like to look at some of the Accessibility features that are available and particularly things like what Backstage View can offer and so on, then that’s a very useful source of information. So that completes our review of the Outlook 2010 Workspace. A couple more topics will come up later on, but now let’s move back to looking at a little bit more detail of some of the specific Modules.

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Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Managing Data File Folders Toby: Welcome back. In this section, we’re going to start to take a more detailed look at Email. This is by far the prevalent means of communication nowadays and being able to use Emails full potential can make us much more efficient and effective both at work and at home in all sorts of communication. Before we look at some more details about how we actually Create Messages, Send Messages, Receive Messages, and so on, we’re going to need to find out a little more about how those Messages are stored. And this will lead us on to find out how we can deal with things like Junk Mail and so on. A lot of the detail of storage we’re going to look at later, but we need to look at a few basic ideas first. And the first thing I’m going to do is take you to Backstage View, click on Open, and introduce the concept of a thing called an Outlook Data File which is often referred to as a .pst File. If I click here on Open Outlook Data File, I would see that there are actually two .pst files available to me here.

There’s an Outlook.pst and one called

[email protected] Okay that will do us for the moment, just try to remember those two names. Now I’m going to look at my Accounts. Back into Backstage View, Account Settings, click on that Dialog. I have three Email Accounts setup: a Gmail which is a Google Email Account, Live.co which is a Microsoft Hotmail Live Account, and [email protected] The last one of these is the one that’s a POP Account. I’m going to select that and then I’m going to look at the bottom of this Dialog because at the bottom of the Dialog it says Selected Account delivers New Messages to the following location. Any New Messages that arrive in the name of that Account, [email protected] will go into one of those two .pst files that we saw before. The one that was actually second in the list. That’s an important point to remember. Now let’s go back, select Mail, look at that Account, [email protected], and Open it up. We’re now going to look at the contents of that Account. So we’re looking at the Email Account [email protected] and if I Open up in Mail in the top half of the Navigation Pane, I can see a number of sections. These are actually Folders. And these Folders each have a very specific purpose and we’re going to look through those, the purpose of each of these Folders now. Starting at the top, the first Folder contains incoming mail, so that’s the Inbox. Over here I can see all of the Messages that have come into that Account. Next to the name Inbox there’s a number, in this case five, and that five indicates the number of Messages that are so far unread by me. It says five. If I take one of those Messages, like this one, double © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 click to Open it up, Close it again, you’ll see it’s back to four because as far as Outlooks concerned I’ve read that Message. The next Folder is the Sent Items Folder and this keeps all of the Emails that I have Sent and, of course, we sent a couple before and here they are. When you’ve sent an Email you may want to just Delete it or you may want to keep a Copy. Some people keep a Copy in the Sent Items Folder. But we’re going to come back to that in a little while. The third one is the Deleted Items Folder and this, as the name implies, keeps any items that I have Deleted. One of the most common mistakes we all make, not just in Email, but in using computers in general, is we Delete something and then we go: Oh no! What did I Delete that for? Oh where has it gone? Well, in the same way that you’re PC has a Recycle bin, the Deleted Items Folder in Outlook is pretty much a Recycle bin of a very specific type. It keeps anything you’ve Deleted and you’d normally have to physically go and Delete them from the Deleted Items Folder before they’ve actually gone. But, in fact, that’s a setting that we’re going to look at later on anyway. For the moment think of it as Outlook’s own very specific Recycle bin. The fourth section is the Junk Email Folder and once I’ve done a few steps that I’m going to do in a little while, that’s where any Junk Mail that arriving at my Account is going to go. The Outbox holds Messages that are waiting to be Sent. The last one, Search Folders, is one that we’re going to turn our attention to in a little while as well, but basically it’s a way of easily being able to locate a specific or groups of Messages, particularly when we’ve actually managed to get quite a lot of Email together and it becomes much more difficult to find specific Message that we might want. So those six Folders are pretty useful ones and pretty standard ones that you’re going to get with most Accounts. Now let’s look at the first one of those .pst files. Most people that use any recent version of Outlook have a File called Outlook.pst that is their main Outlook Data File and we’ve got one as well. One of the differences between our setup at the moment and a more common setup is that our Outlook Data File does not have currently an Email Account associated with it. If I Open Outlook Data File in the top part of the Navigation Pane, I can see that it too has a number of Folders. It has an Inbox Folder which is empty, a Drafts Folder which is empty, Sent Items empty, Deleted Items which has got some items in it, Junk Mail, and so on. And we’re going to look at the rest of these a little bit later on. But at the moment, it has no specific Email Account associated with it. The Deleted Items Folder will collect all sorts of items that are Deleted. So, for instance, this Deleted Items Folder will keep Deleted Contact details.

And, in fact, most of the information that I’ve Saved so far on

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Learn Outlook 2010 Appointments, Contacts, and so on has gone into this Outlook Data File. Probably without you realizing that that’s where it’s gone. What I’m going to do now is to Create a New Folder within that Outlook Data File. It’s quite a simple operation. Select the Header, right click, New Folder, and I’m going to Create something like a Folder called Larry Saved. I’m going to say click on OK and I’ve now got a new Folder in my Outlook Data File, my .pst file. I’m now going to go down to the Account we were looking at just now, toby.a, Sent Items. There was an Email invitation sent to Larry about dinner Thursday, there it is, and I’m going to put that in that Folder. I’m going to drop it in there. Now what I’ve done there is actually two or three important things. First of all, it’s now gone from the Sent Items Folder down here under the Email Account I used to send it. So it’s gone from there, but also it’s now been stored in this Folder for future reference. And, in fact, I may use that Folder on an ongoing basis to store Emails or anything else for that matter to do with my friend Larry Ross. And the other important thing is that this Folder is inside my Outlook Data File, my general Outlook Data File. So this is generally a good, safe place to keep things. That doesn’t mean that I have to put everything in that Folder. I could’ve left this Message in an equivalent Folder in the [email protected] .pst file, the one associated with this Account. But it’s sometimes useful to have everything in one place. So there we are. I’ve got one centralized storage space for everything to do with Larry Ross. So, now let’s look at one of the other Accounts. Again back into Backstage View, Account Settings. This time let’s look at that very first Account, this one. This one is a Google Mail Account, a Gmail Account, and like the Bluecays Account it has a .pst file associated with it. But it’s one whose name we haven’t seen before and, in fact, there’s a good reason for that. It’s a .pst File that’s in a different location. It’s in a different Folder to the one associated with Toby’s Account. There is no reason that you have to keep all of your .pst files in one place. Some people may think, well, it’s a nice, neat way of doing things but you could actually have your .pst file on a completely different Drive on your computer if you wanted to. So this is also an Account associated with a .pst file, but it’s a .pst file in a different place. PST Files can hold all sorts of things. They can hold Email, Contact details, Appointment details, all sorts of things, Journal entries, Notes, and so on. So you could actually finish up with a number of .pst Files. For this one is I Close that, go back to Mail, go to the Gmail Account which is this one, Open it. You can see it’s pretty much got a comparable set of Folders to the first one we looked at. There are a couple of differences. This one has a Folder called Travel and a Folder called Work that © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 I’ll talk about later on. It’s also got a Personal Folder here. But it also has a Junk Email Folder which will take any Junk Email that our processing finds, as we’ll see later on. And within it, it has another Folder structure which has got Sent Mail, Spam as it’s called here, Drafts, and so on. So, again, although it’s the same principle of its own .pst File and its own Email Account, the Folder structures within those Accounts can be different. If I click on Sent Mail here, I’ve again got, in this case, three mails that I’ve sent and I could store any one of those Emails in one of the Folders in one of my other Data Files, such as the Outlook.pst basic Data File. So it’s actually a very flexible system. Now just to finish off on this section, let’s go back here again, look at Accounts, and click on tobya.live.co.uk. That hasn’t got a .pst file and that’s what we’re going to look at next.

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Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Outlook Connector; Customizing Mail Toby: Hello again. In this section, we’re going to carry on looking at Email in more detail. In the last section, we looked at .pst files and a brief summary of the sort of things that are contained in a .pst file and we looked at how different Email Accounts can be associated with different .pst files. At the end of the section, we looked at an Email Account that didn’t seem to have a .pst file and we’re going to look at that Account now because it’s a very special case that you’re quite likely to come across. If I go back into Backstage View, go to my Accounts, and choose the middle one which is actually a Windows Hotmail Live Account. I can see at the bottom that there is no .pst file associated with it. It does however say Selected Account delivers New Messages to the following location: toby.a.live.co.uk/Inbox. Let’s go and have a look at that location. There it is, Open it up, and in fact I’ve got a set of Folders. I’ve got an Inbox, Drafts, and so on. The mystery is no .pst file, and I’m going to explain that mystery now by talking about Outlook Connector.

The Microsoft Outlook Connector is a software device

provided by Microsoft which enables you to connect and synchronize an Account in Outlook with a Hotmail Live Account which might either be a Hotmail Account or a Windows Live Account. Now I’ve got a Window down here where I’ve earlier logged on to my Windows Live Hotmail Account, here it is, and it’s in a browser. It’s in Internet Explorer. And I’ve got an Inbox and if I look at the Inbox I’ll see I’ve got two Messages in there, Toby’s Gmail Account Message and Windows Live Hotmail. If I now go back to Outlook, look in the Inbox, low and behold I’ve got the same two Messages because I’m actually looking at the same Inbox. And that’s really what the Outlook Connector and these types of Account are about. We are not effectively keeping, certainly in the long term, a Copy of all of our Messages in a .pst file. We’re actually synchronizing a local Copy in Outlook with our web-based Copy which we can access anywhere that we have a web browser. Now before we move on, there’s one other very interesting point here that I’m going to come back to again later. Let’s go back to the Windows Live Account and one of the things you will see down here is a Contact List, and, in fact, this Contact List has one Contact in it. Let me now go back to Outlook again, click on Contacts, and in fact, I’ve got two Contacts Lists; something you may not have noticed before. One of them you might just be able to see in grayed out Outlook Data File and the other Contacts List is one for my Live Account. Click on that and there is that same one Contact. Now what this means is

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Learn Outlook 2010 that apart from synchronizing Email between Outlook and a Hotmail Live Account I can synchronize Contacts. And as you’ll see I can synchronize other things as well, but more of that later. So now that we’ve got some idea of where everything is being stored we can start to get ourselves organized in terms of putting our Email in places where we’re going to be able to find it easily and where it’s going to make some kind of sense. Just before we go into the detail of that, let’s go back to Email Accounts again, Account Settings, and on the second Tab on the Account Setting Dialogue there’s one called Data Files. And, in fact, this one shows all three of the .pst files that we have: one for the Gmail Account, one for the POP Account, and the one for the Outlook Account that has things like most of my Contacts in it and most of my Appointments and so on. Now with each of these, it’s possible to get some more information about it. So, for instance, selecting the first one and clicking on Settings here brings up a little Dialog which is very useful. And there are two particularly useful things in this. One of them is .pst files tend to get pretty big. And after a while when they’ve been used, items have been Deleted or moved around and so on, they tend to get a bit wasteful of space, and as a manual exercise you can use the Compact Now button to actually compact a .pst file and make some space. So if you start running short of space on your computer or the .pst files seem to be getting a bit out hand, Compact Now is a good option. The other option here is Change Password, which is very important. Click on this and it enables you to put a Password on any one of your .pst files or, of course, on all three of them if you want. This means that if somebody wants to Open those .pst files who you don’t want to Open it or doesn’t have the Password, they’re not going to be able to. These .pst files that I’m using here don’t have Passwords on. If I put a Password on, then it’s going to mean that anybody Opening that File is going to need to know the Password. So that’s a pretty good Security feature. I’m going to leave the Passwords Off for the moment and we’ll talk about Security issues later. I’ll just show you how that works. So, in summary we have a number of Folders, .pst files, Email Accounts, and we’re going to do a little bit now to tidy them up. Let’s start with the Outlook Data File. We already have Inbox, Drafts, and so on. We have a Folder here, Larry Saved, which I’m going to use for all of the Emails to my friend Larry, and we have a few other Folders here that we’re going to talk about later like RSS Feeds and Search Folders. Let’s go down to the Live Account again, Inbox. © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 There’s a Message here, Getting started with Windows Live Hotmail, which I’ve read; I don’t need any more. If I right click on a Message, click on Delete, it’s Deleted. Click on the Deleted Items Folder and there it is. If I want to get rid of it altogether, I would click it in the Deleted Items Folder and just Delete again. That permanently Deletes the Message. So let’s Delete both of these Messages. I’ve got one selected, hold the Control key down, select the second one, right click, Delete. The action will supply to all items in the selected group. So it knows that I’ve got a couple selected. Click on OK. I get an extra warning here because Outlook knows that I’m Deleting Messages that are in the Deleted Items Folder. So these are going to be permanently Deleted. So yes they’ve gone. Let’s now move onto the Gmail Folder, in there, Inbox. I’ve actually got four Messages. Now to look at the Messages in sequence I can make use of the Reading Pane on the right. And, in fact, if I click on the first Message, which is selected at the moment because it’s shaded, I can see the Message in the Reading Pane. Click on the next Message, see the Message, and so on. I can actually use the arrow keys on the Keyboard to go down and up through the Messages and as I click on each one the Reading Pane on the right shows that Message. As you may remember from earlier on, some of the Messages have pictures suppressed for Security reasons, but basically the Message is there. Each of the Messages has, in my case, click here to Download Pictures. I can select Download Pictures if I’m happy about the source and then the pictures will appear. If I click on the View Menu, one of the options on the View Menu is Reading Pane. And if I drop down there I have three main options. I have Right, which is what’s set at the moment. I have Bottom, which puts the Reading Pane at the bottom. And I have Off which suppresses it altogether. You may think it’s rather a strange thing to suppress the Reading Pane, but if I double click I can always bring the whole Message up anyway. And some people do actually like to work in that style. I prefer to have the Reading Pane on and I’m quite happy to have it on the right. So that’s the Reading Pane. So having seen how to use the Reading Pane, I can quickly flick through the Messages and decide which ones I want to keep and which ones I don’t. I’m going to keep all three of these and, in fact, I’m going to put them into that Work Folder; out of the Inbox and into the Work Folder. There’s a number of ways of moving Messages. I can move them one at a time. I can move several at once. I’m going to move all three of these in one operation, and there are a © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 couple of ways of doing this. First of all, to select a range of Messages click on the first one, hold the Shift key down, click on the last one, and they’re all selected. You can tell they’re all selected because they’re all highlighted. To move them there are a number of possibilities. If you go to the Home Tab, there is a Move button with a drop down and the drop down gives you a whole range of things to choose from. It knows that we recently put something in the Folder Larry Saved. So it puts it at the top of the list here. It offers us the Contacts Folder, the Journal Folder, the Calendar Folder; none of these are particularly relevant to that. If I want to move it to another Folder I click there and it gives me a list of the Folders I might want to move it to. If I want to Copy it to a Folder I get the same list. The difference is that with a Copy it will leave the Copy in my original Folder as well. So I effectively get a Copy of the Message. And finally, it says Always move Messages in this conversation, which is an option we’ll come back to later on. So that’s the Move button. Still with my three selected right click, click on Move, and you get exactly the same Menu. So if I want to move them all to that Work Folder, I would say Other Folder because I want to move them. Let’s scrunch that one up. Go to the Account that I’m using, which is the last one, choose the Work Folder, click on OK. It warns me that it will apply to all the items I’ve got selected, click on OK again, and the move is performed. There we are. If I go to the Work Folder they’re all there.

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Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Creating Rules for Sent/Incoming Emails Toby: Hello again. So now we know how to store our Messages, move them around, and so on. And what we’re going to learn in this section is how to automate that process. Sometimes we just have a Message, we just decide to store it somewhere. But a lot of the time we may have a Rule that we want to apply whenever we’re using Outlook. I’m going to demonstrate Rules in Outlook with a pretty simple example to begin with. And I’m going to apply the Rule that every time I send a Message to my friend Larry I am going to File it in that Folder that we created earlier, Larry Saved. Now there’s the Folder over there. I’m in Outlook with Mail selected and on the Home Tab there’s a button here called Rules. Click on Rules. I have Manage Rules and Alerts and from here I can create a new Rule. Now there are some Wizard-type approaches to these things, but I’m going to start by creating this Rule pretty much step-by-step so that you get a good understanding of what’s going on. If you look in this top section, down here it says Start from a Blank Rule. And there are two options, Apply Rule on a Message I receive or Apply Rule on Messages I send. I’m going to apply this Rule on Messages I send. So that’s the first step. Now what Outlook does is to ask me to select on what basis I will choose a Sent Message. So has it got specific words in the Subject? Let’s take an example. Supposing I was interested in fishing and I had a Folder I’d created called Fishing and every time I wrote to somebody about fishing I wanted to put a Copy of that Email in that Folder. I could look for the specific word Fishing in the Subject of my Email. In this case, I am going to look for an Email that’s Sent to a specific person. So there’s an option here, Sent to people or public group. I’m going to choose Sent to people or public group. Having selected that option and seeing it appear in the Rule at the bottom, I have a highlighted in blue Underlined entry and what that means is I need to actually choose the people or public group. By click on that, Dialog Rule Address comes up. I find the person or group that I want; in this case, Larry Ross. Double click. His name goes into the box at the bottom. Click on OK and what my Rule now says is Apply this Rule after I send the Message sent to and there’s the name of the person. Click on Next. Next part of the Rule, What do you want to do with the Message? Well I want to move it to a specified Folder. There are a number of other options. I could mark it as a particular importance. I could mark it with a particular sensitivity. But I’m going to move a Copy to the specified Folder. Again I’ve got a blue Underlined entry; the specified Folder is, well it’s Larry Saved, the one I created earlier on.

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Learn Outlook 2010 Click on Next. That seems to be pretty much the end, but there are one or two other things. I can specify exceptions to the Rule. I’ve got no exceptions in this case, but its things like Except through a specified Account. So I might say, well, if I sent it through my Gmail Account don’t move it to the Folder. None of that applies in this case. Click on Next. Now there’s my Rule. To turn on the Rule I have this check box here. I can create this Rule on a specific Account or on all Accounts. I’m going to create it on all Accounts. And the top one is interesting. I can Run it on Messages that are already in this Account. I’m not going to do that at the moment. I’m going to start applying the Rule from now, so I click on Finish. So I’ve actually now created my Rule. So there we are. There is my New Rule in the Rules and Alerts Dialog. The check mark tells me that the Rule is activated. I can deactivate it at any time by un-checking it. I’ll leave it checked. Click Apply if I want to do something else. We’ll just click OK and the Rule is now activated. Let’s give it a try. Let’s create a New Email Message. Button at the top there or Control-N. I’m going to write a Message to Larry, just start typing the name in the To box. Subject of my Message is Test of my New Rule and then just Send and see what happens. If I look at my Sent Items Folder within this Account, there is the Message, Test of my New Rule, which is in the Sent Items Folder. If I go up to the Larry Saved Folder not only is that my new Message there, but, of course, it is a new Message as far as this Folder’s concerned and it’s Flagged as such by the Folder name being Bold and a one in brackets saying there’s an unread Message in there. So, when I’m next browsing through Outlook I would see that one of the Messages in there is a new one and even though I wrote it myself it just brings it to my attention that there’s a new Message in there. So there we are. That’s a simple Rule on a Message that’s been Sent. Now I’m going to setup another Rule, but this time on Incoming Messages.

And I can

demonstrate Alerts with this as well. So click on Rules, Manage Rules and Alerts, New Rule. This time it’s going to be on a Message I receive and click on Next. In this case, I’m going to be looking for specific words in the Subject. And the specific words in the Subject I’m looking for is Work. If they were actually, say, two or more, I could specify another term here as well. What about Business? Add that as well. So it’s now looking for either Work or Business in the Subject of the Message. Click Next. What do you want to do with the Message? Well, I don’t particularly want to move it anywhere; I’m going to leave it in the Inbox. But I’m going to Flag © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 it in a couple of very specific ways. One of the ways I’m going to Flag it is to play a Sound. And another way I’m going to do it is I’m going to display an Alert and display a Desktop Alert. Now I need to choose the Sound. There’s a whole load presented to me here. Let’s choose one of these Calligraphy Sounds. What about that one? Windows battery critical Sound. Click on Next. There’s the exceptions. Again, I’ve not got any exceptions in this case. Specify the name. I’m going to say Work Message arrived. Perhaps put an exclamation mark on it. Rule on all Accounts and click on Finish. There we are. So that’s my new Rule and I’m going to get one of my kind colleagues to send me a Message to see if this works. So I’ve arranged for another Message to be sent for another Account and while we’re waiting for that, I just click on OK here and talk about sending and receiving Messages. Depending on how our installation of Outlook 2010 is setup, Messages may or may not be collected automatically. And that is one aspect of the setup of Outlook that we’re going to look at a little bit later on. For the moment, to Send and Receive Messages we have a specific button, which you’ve actually seen before. It’s on the Send and Receive Tab when we’re looking at Mail, right on the left Send and Receive all Folders. The Tool Tip tells you all about it. Send and Receive items such as Mail Messages, Calendar, Appointments, and Tasks in all Folders. You may also remember that this particular button is on the Quick Access Toolbar and is one that you would normally leave there. It’s a very handy button to use just to make sure that either any Messages are sent that need sending or you receive any that are due to be received, and the Keyboard Shortcut for that is F9. So you might find yourself hitting the F9 key quite a bit. Let’s push it now. You’re going to have to watch the screen quite carefully for a moment, particularly the lower right hand part of the screen. And down here you can see Toby Arnott Message about Work. So that is Flagged up on the screen. I can see that something has arrived and it’s also played a Sound just to point out that that Message has come in. If I go to this Email, look in the Inbox, and there’s that Message that’s just arrived. So that’s an Alert and a Sound on an incoming Message. So we’ve been talking about this sending and receiving of mail. Let’s look at the setup of that now because it’s really very important. Backstage View, Options. On the Advanced Tab there is a Send and Receive section. On the left we have a checked box here, Send immediately when connected. Nowadays most of us are connected to the internet pretty much most of the time. And when we are sending Emails, it’s good to know they’re sent straightaway so they get the © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 recipient as quickly as possible. However, we’re not always connected to the internet all the time. You may be working disconnected on your laptop, perhaps in the car, or on a train, and you cannot send Email straightaway in some situations. Some people, of course, still do only have dial-up connections, particularly people in remote locations. But for most of us this box will be checked. If we click on Send and Receive on the right, we have a number of options. We have at the moment all of our Accounts in an All Accounts Group and in fact that means that they’re all treated in the same way. You can setup different Accounts to be treated in different ways. So, for instance, your Hotmail Account could have different settings from your Business Account. If we go down to the lower half of this Dialog, we can see that a couple of very important settings are already made. Schedule and Automatic Send and Receive every 30 minutes. Just now we pushed a button to invoke a Send and Receive Manually. You can always do that. But most people prefer to have a regular Send and Receive scheduled running in the background, set at about 30 minutes is quite typical. Mine I often have set at about 10 minutes. And when Outlook is offline, we can still schedule an automatic Send and Receive if we want to, in that it might try to see that if it can connect. But at the moment this is disconnected. So I’ve only got it set when I’m connected online. These are very important settings. You may want these numbers set higher or lower depending on your particular location, the particular connection you have to the internet. But these are important things. So that’s about it on Send and Receive for now. In the next section, we’re going to look a little bit more about making our Emails look rather more attractive.

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Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Formatting Email Messages Toby: Welcome back. In this section, we’re going to look at Formatting Email Messages. In the early days of Email the Messages were very simple, usually just plain text with no Formatting, Graphics included Charts and Graphs and so on. Nowadays Email Messages can really be quite complex and presentation of those Email Messages is often very important. We’re going to start by creating an Email Message to my friend Larry. We know how to create Messages now. And when we do a New Message, the Ribbon that we get here has a number of Tabs, most of which we haven’t really looked at so far. That’s what we’re going to do now. I’m going to start with the Format Text Tab and in particular I’m going to look at this Format Group here because this presents us with three options. One option is Plain Text which really is just plain text. There’s no Formatting, there are no Colors, Graphs, Charts, whatever. Some people are still restricted to sending and receiving plain text, but that’s really quite unusual nowadays. Rich Text is if you like the middle flavor. It’s the one where you can do a certain amount of Formatting and presentation work, but it’s quite restricted and usually only use it say within an exchange organization or with somebody who’s using Microsoft products but doesn’t have access to HTML. HTML, Hypertext Markup Language, that the language of the internet and the world wide web is the format of choice nowadays and most people will use HTML format. The Messages do tend to be bigger in terms of the amount of bandwidth they use when you send and receive them. But that really doesn’t stop people much nowadays because people generally have a lot of capacity, a lot of bandwidth anyway. So we’re going to choose the HTML option for our Message to Larry. If you’re familiar with other elements of Office 2010, you may know about Themes and Styles. If not we’re going to look at those in just a moment. But before we start on that, let’s have a look at the actual composition of this Message. When I start typing in the Message I’ll normally put the addressee, the name of the person I’m going to send it to first. When I’m doing that, I am not able to change the Format of this line. The Address Line, the two or the Copies for that matter, are not Formatted Text. They are Plain Text. There’s no point in Formatting them really. So when I put a name in, in this case I choose my friend Larry, there is no Formatting to do. I’m not going to make that name Bold or Italic or green or anything else. When I actually come into the body of the Message however, a number of these options become enabled. So I © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 could, for instance, say: Hi Larry, select that Text, and click on Bold. Or change the Color of that Text and so on. So once I’m in the body of the Text HTML is at my mercy and I can use whatever Formatting I like. But before I type the Message and do a bit of fancy Formatting, let’s take a quick look at Themes and Styles. So having decided on HTML let’s look at the options we have now with this Message. If we go to the Options Tab on the Ribbon, we can choose the Theme and the Themes are consistent across all of the elements of Office 2010. It’s not really the place here to go through the way that Themes and Styles work in detail. But just in very brief terms, if we choose a Theme from the available ones for Office, let’s choose Austin. That gives us not only a selection of Styles that we can apply, but a selection of Colors. So within the Austin Theme these are the Standard Colors here. It gives us a range of Fonts or a base Font which is Century Gothic. And we also have a choice of a number of Effects that we can use. So we’re not going to go into Themes in detail here, but I’ve chosen a Theme of Austin. If I now go to the Format Text, click in the area where I’m going to type my Message. I can choose a Style and I’m going to choose that Style there, a Heading 1 Style, and I’m going to type Hi Larry. And you can see that the Formatting is done for me and it’s consistent with the Style of Austin. The next line I’m not going to treat as a Heading. So go into Quick Styles again. I’m going to say this is a Normal Style, type my Message. Hope you’re well. Please see the attached and then I’m going to attach that proposal in just a moment. As I type having chosen the Theme and the Style, you’ll see here that the Font is set for me, the Font Size is set, and any other settings are automatically put in place for me by Outlook. Of course, I could change any of these. If I wanted to change the Color of a couple of words, select, look at the Theme Colors, maybe choose that Theme Color for those words and so on. So there’s a lot of flexibility within the document for changing the Formatting, but the Theme and Style together give me a nice solid consistent base. So, I’ve just about finished typing my Message now. Just finish, there we are and now I’ve got a couple of things that I need to do. First of all, I’m talking about sending Larry a proposal on the Microsoft Initiative. I put that in the Subject of my Message. So let’s just type that, there we are. So he’ll know what it’s about. And I’m going to Attach the proposal itself. Now in order to do that, I use the Message Tab and just to the right of the middle there is an Attach File button, click that, and it Opens a basically an Explorer Dialog which enables me to find the document. © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 I’ve actually put it in my Documents Folder. So it’s down here somewhere. There we are. Double click and Insert, and an additional Field comes up here saying Attached and then the name of the document. If I wanted to read the document, maybe check I’ve sent the right one, I just click on this and it’ll Open the document up for me. So that’s how you Attach a File to a Mail Message. When I send the Mail Message the File will go with it. Larry will receive the Message and be able to Open the File and read it and maybe Save it on his own computer if he wants to. So my Message is just about ready to send, but I just can do one more thing to it. I need to leave it for a moment and come back to it. Now one of the important things about Outlook is that when you’re working on a new Message, which may take you some time to prepare, you may not get time to finish it and you can Save the Message as a Draft, which is what I’m going to do now. So rather than finish it and send it I’m going to Close the Message and I’ll come back to that in just a moment. I’ve dealt with the issue I needed to deal with and now I can carry on with my Email Message. If you stop preparing an Email Message partway through, the Draft is Saved in this Drafts Folder. Click on Drafts, there it is. Double click to Open, and there is my Message the same as I left it. The next thing I want to do with that Message is to add a Signature. Now a Signature in the context of Outlook is basically a set of Contact details. If I put the cursor at the end of my Message and on the Message Tab on the Ribbon go to the Signature button and click on the drop down. I have a choice of available Signatures. There is only one, Toby Personal. Let me just click that and watch what happens at the end of the Email Message. My fictional Contact details are added to the end of the Message. If I wanted to have alternative Contact details, supposing for example that I’m happy with my Personal Signature there but I wanted a Business version as well, click on the drop down below Signature again, click on Signatures. I can have a whole list of Signatures here. I’ve only got one at the moment. I could add a new one. Let’s call it Toby Business. Click on OK and I can enter the details here. There are Formatting buttons available. I can include a Business Card, something we’re going to look at a little bit later on. And so I can build up a whole selection of Signatures. So my Message is pretty much ready to send, but I’ve got one more job to do on it before I send it. And that’s a job that always do before I send a Message and that’s to Spell-check it. On the © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 Review Tab on the Ribbon there are a number of options. We’ll look at one or two of the others later on, but really the most important one is the one on the left, Spelling and Grammar. This will check Spelling and Grammar of my document. There are some options that I can set on this, which we’ll look at later on, but basically to do a Spell-check click on that and it’s found a Spelling mistake actually, where I put the word Attached I’ve only put one T. It’s found that I should have two. Change that and then it says every things okay. Click on OK. My Message is now ready to send. So I just click on the Send button and away it goes. You may now be wondering where my Copy of that Message is. So let’s work that out. My Default Email Account is my Google Mail Account, Gmail. If I go down to that Account on the top half of the Navigation Pane, Open that Account up, go into the Gmail section, and click on Sent Mail. There is my Message to Larry, and you may also recall that we said we were going to Copy, copies of all of these mails into my Larry Saved Account. And so a Copy of it has gone in there as well. In the next section, we’re going to look at some more details of Email and particularly in relation to dealing with Copying, Replies, and so on.

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Learn Outlook 2010

Video: General Mail Options Toby: Welcome back. We’re going to look now in some detail at Replies and Forwards on Outlook 2010 Emails. But before we do that we’re going to look at the general options for Email which is necessary to setup for your own specific installation. If I go into Backstage View, click on Options, and the second Tab down is Mail. We have a whole range of options here. A couple of them are going to come back to later, but let’s look at the main ones now. Compose Messages, Change the Editing Setting for Messages. You can set the Default to HTML, Rich Text, or Plain Text. We have it set at HTML which is what most people would have nowadays. When we Sent a Message just now we did a Spell-check before we sent it. I always do a Spellcheck before I send Messages and checking this box, Always check Spelling before sending, makes sure a Spell-check is done automatically. This button can be used to bring up a set of options related to the Spell-checker and these cover things like whether to do Grammar checking at the same time, setup Custom Dictionaries, and to look at certain Rules like Ignoring words in upper case and so on. There isn’t really time to go through all of this now, but it’s a good idea of your installation of Outlook 2010 to go through and check each of these options. Signatures, we looked at just now. I’ve got my Personal Signature setup there. I think I probably also need a Business Signature. You would need to setup your own as well. And Stationary and Fonts. Again, we don’t really have time on this course to cover this, but you can actually setup personal Stationary which you can use on all of your Email Messages which will give you personalized Headings and so on. At the very least you can choose a Default Theme. So, for instance, if you liked the Blueprint Theme you could choose that and make that your Default, and from that Theme you can choose the Themes Fonts only for when you’re working on composing a Message, for example. So we’re not going to go through that in detail now; that’s outside the scope of what we’re doing here. But again, worth going through that and experimenting. We’re going to look at Panes a little bit later on. Message Arrival; when new Messages arrive play a sound, briefly change the mouse pointer, show an envelope icon in the Task Bar, and display a Desktop Alert. So you can do one or more of these things to help you notice that a Message has arrived. There are some Desktop Alert Settings here. How long should the Desktop Alert appear for? How transparent should it be? And so on. You may remember the example of the Desktop Alert that we showed earlier was a box in the bottom right of the screen that appeared for seven

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Learn Outlook 2010 seconds actually and was semi-transparent, but at least drew our attention to the fact that a Message had arrived. There are some other settings here related to Conversations, Replies, and Forwards, which we’ll come back to shortly. Save Messages; we saw just now how Outlook 2010 saves a Draft of a Message in a Drafts Folder. There are some controls here that we can use to govern how many minutes between Saves of that Draft so that we don’t lose a lot of work and so on. How we store Sent Messages, other things about sending Messages like separating names of recipients by commas, automatically checking the names in our Address Book to make sure that we’re people we know, and so on. And finally as we go down here some tracking options. And then into Message Format. Again, relating to some of the Formatting questions that we looked at before. So there’s a whole raft of changes there that you might need to make. It’s worth going through those systematically, looking at each option, perhaps experimenting with it, and making sure that you’re installation of Outlook 2010 is setup just right for you. Okay, I’ve got a New Email Message here now. It’s in my Gmail Folder and the Inbox Folder within that has a one after it. The Folder names Bold; that means I’ve got an unread Message in there. Open it up. It’s from my friend Larry and it relates to the proposal I sent on the Microsoft Initiative. I’m going to Reply to this. I’m going to use the Reply button up here. Click it and Outlook creates a New Message for me in which the Subject is RE: Proposal on Microsoft Initiative. And I can just type my Reply now. Hi Larry and so on. And if that’s all I want to do I can then Send that Reply back to Larry and that’s fine. But there is an alternative. When we’re Replying to an Email as part of a Conversation its useful to be able to refer to earlier comments to make more sense of our Replies. And that’s something we’re going to look at doing here. So, I’m going to go back into Backstage View, back to the Options for Mail, down to the section on Replies and Forwards, and here where it says Preface comments with, I’m going to check this box and Preface comments with I’m just going to put Toby. I’m going to leave these set at Include original Message text and include original Message text, that one for Replies and this one for Forwards. Click on OK. I’m going to Open Larry’s Email again, click on Reply again, and it looks as though exactly the same thing has happened. But it hasn’t quite because if I now go down to Larry’s Message, click at the end of the line that says, Do you think it can really work? If I press Return my Reply comment goes into his text with my name, that’s the Toby that I said in the Options, I can put anything in there I like, and my comment about that. © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 And then similarly, Can you tell me if section two needs some input from Don? I can say: Yes and I’ll Forward your comments on to Don. Then when I Send this Message Larry will get my comments directly related to his which will make it much easier for him to understand my comments. The same approach can be used when we’re Forwarding Messages. I’m going to now Forward Larry’s Reply to our colleague Don so that Don can give his feedback. So when I click on Forward I can say: Hi Don, Please see correspondence with Larry. My comments relate to his. Regards, Toby.

I could, of course, put my Signature in there. So where Toby’s put his

comments I can actually say, and again my comments appear within Larry’s and mine are distinguishable both by being a different Color and with my name at the beginning. So I can now Send this off to our colleague Don and I can wait for a Reply from Don. Before I actually Forward this Message on to Don, I’m going to look at another couple of features of all Email Messages that can be very important, and the first one of them is the ability to Copy an Email Message. When I’m sending this on to Don and put his proper Email Address in there, I can also specify somebody to receive a Copy. If I click on the CC button there a list of Email Addresses from my Address Book comes in and if I wanted to Copy say the Email to Andrew, the first person in the list, having selected his name I just click the CC button and Andrew’s going to get a Copy. If I also wanted Claire to get a Copy, same thing. Note that the two names are separated by a semicolon and if I were typing the names into the CC box directly, I would separate them by semicolon as well; although other separators are possible. If I want to send a Blind Copy say to Fiona, select Fiona’s name, click on Blind Copy. The significance of a Blind Copy is that when I Send Fiona a Blind Copy of this Email nobody else will know that she has received it. They won’t even know that a Blind Copy has been sent to somebody. This is a good way of exercising a bit of discretion when you’re Forwarding or Sending Emails. So if I OK this and back to my original Mail, as soon as I put in Don’s Email Address, click on Send, two people will get a Copy, one person will get a Blind Copy. Just before we do that the second point I want to make is that I can Flag a Message as of High Importance or Low Importance. If I Flag it as High Importance when that person receives it, it will appear to be a High Priority Message to them. Similarly Low Importance, I’ll be saying to them here’s a Message for you,

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Learn Outlook 2010 but I wouldn’t worry about it too much if I were you. So, that’s it on those two particular options for Email Messages. Finally for this section on Email, let’s look at a very convenient way of quickly processing Emails. If we have a particular Email in an Inbox and we want to process it in one of the ways that we’ve looked at, select the Message, right click, and there’s a pretty good summary of all the things that you can do. One or two of these we haven’t looked at yet. For instance, Junk Mail we’re going to come back to later. But most of them we have. There’s a Quick Print option. As the name implies select that and provided your Printer is setup correctly that will quickly Print the Message out for you. We’ve got a Reply option, a Forward option, a Follow-up which means we can Flag the Message. That’s something we did before to say it needs some attention later. It will appear in the To-Do Pane on the right to remind us that we need to do something about it. Quick Steps we haven’t looked at. It’s outside the scope of this course, but it’s basically a way of following a set procedure for dealing with certain things.

More Actions, Forward as

Attachment, Forward as Text Message. We haven’t looked at either of those in this course, but they’re pretty much explain what they mean. Rules we’ve looked at. We can create a Rule for dealing with the Messages. Move it to another Folder, Ignore it or Delete it. That’s a pretty good summary of the main things you’re going to want to be able to do with Mail Messages. So we’ll be coming back to Junk Mail a little bit later on, but in the next section we’re going to move on to Tasks again.

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Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Assigning/Completing Tasks Toby: Hello again. In this section, we’re going to look at Tasks in a lot more detail and particularly how we assign a Task to other people and how we complete Tasks. We’ve already looked at one or two ways of creating Tasks earlier in the course. Now we’re going to look at an approach which is quite a general approach and quite useful and quick. I’m going to create a Task related to this proposal that we’re working on, related to the Microsoft Initiative. And first of all, if I use the Navigation Pane to go to the Larry Saved Folder and select one of the Messages that was Sent earlier in relation to this. I’m going to Drag that Message over Tasks in the bottom half of the Navigation Pane. What happens is that a Task is created with the Text of that Message trail in it. And particularly what I want to do is I want to give this Task to my colleague Don and ask him to do a bit more work on the proposal and particularly the Section 2 part that we mentioned earlier. Now in order to do this, I’m going to set some Dates. So I’m going to say this could start straightaway, we’ll put that for today. And I’m going to set the End Date as Friday, which is the 23rd. I give it a Status of Not Started and the Priority is set to High. And it’s 0% complete because Don hasn’t started on it yet. I’m going to add a Note to the top and I’m going to write it just like this, and then what I’m going to do is say Assign Task. When I click on Assign Task I’m given a choice of who to Assign it to, which could be more than one person. The person in question in this case is Don Anderton. Double click, click on OK, and the Task is now Assigned to Don. If I Send it to him it will appear in his Inbox. If he’s using Outlook, he’ll then be able to maneuver that around in a similar kind of way to make sure that he gets that work scheduled in his copy of Outlook. When Don gets the Email with the Task Notification, he can Accept or Decline the Task, and if he Accepts it, it will be added as a Task in his copy of Outlook. He’ll report on progress during the course of the week and with a bit of luck and a lot of effort by Don by the end of the week I’ll be getting a Notification to say the Task is complete. When we’re working on Tasks in general, we have a number of options for reporting on progress. Here’s one of the Tasks I’ve created a while ago. I sent myself a limit of last Thursday for completing this Task, which I haven’t done. I’m going to realistically say that it’s about 75% complete. I can adjust the percentages using the little roller buttons next to this Field here. If I were Don I’d be completing

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Learn Outlook 2010 my percentage update on a particular day, maybe the middle of the week, and Emailing that back by way of a Status Report. So Send Status Report and that would be sent to me by Don. So, when we’re working on a Task we can maintain quite a bit of information about it. If a Task is Assigned to somebody else we’ll normally expect them to maintain the information as well. A particular type of information which can be very useful and particularly in a business context is on another Pane. If we click on, in the Show Group, Details, we get a different Pane of information and this information is largely related to Billing. So this is quite useful if the Task is part of a work commitment. Date Completed goes in here. Total Amount of work and the Actual work is here. Actual work so far normally. Mileage here where Expenses are billable. Billing information and the name of the Company for whom we’re doing the work. We can keep updates here. The other sort of information that we might have includes much more detail, textual information that we can put through to One Note. But if we go on to Format Text we can also find that if we have some Text information to go in here we can supplement it with Formatted Text in appropriate Styles, and then with the Insert Tab we can Insert Tables, Pictures, ClipArt, and so on. We have facilities for Mathematical Equations in, Symbols in; so pretty much a broad word processing set there for putting information in the Task Pane. The buttons on the left here also give us facilities for Attaching Files, Attaching Business Cards, and so on. We’ll look at a couple of those later on as well. Let’s look at some of the other things that we can do with Tasks. We can Forward a Task to somebody else. So, for instance, if Don when he received that Task didn’t feel he was the most appropriate person to deal with it, he could Forward it on to somebody else. We can Categorize a Task using our Category scheme. So we could mark it as Urgent, which with this one is; Nonurgent or in one of our other Categories. We can mark it for Follow-up, Dates and so on as we saw before. We can also mark it as Private using this button. What the Private button does means that the Task is still there but other people cannot see it. So if somebody else is looking at your Task list from their machine and you’ve otherwise got it available to people to look at, you can make this particular Task Private. We can make it a High Priority Task, High Importance, a Low Importance Task. The Zoom facility enables us to Zoom in and out of this area at the bottom so that if we’re entering information, putting in Pictures, and so on, we can Zoom in and out to get a better view of the detail of the Task. The other thing to bear in mind in relation to © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 Tasks is we’ve got our own little Quick Access Bar at the top here. Again, this is Customizable and we can put in things like Re-do, Undo, and move through the Task with these arrow buttons. So that’s about it on the basics of individual Tasks. Let’s go back to the general Task View again. Let’s now look in a little bit more detail at some of those Task Views that we talked about earlier on. We know that with Tasks we have a number of different Views. The one we’ve got now is Detailed which shows quite a few bits of information about each Task and a whole list of Tasks. The ones with the Strikethrough are completed Tasks. And as you know we could Customize this display, add Columns, move Columns around, Sort, and Group and so on. Let’s now try a simple list, which basically has the same Tasks with a different set of Columns shown. We can also look at Tasks where there’s something to do. This is quite a different display because in this case we have the list of Tasks on the left and we have a Reading Pane on the right. So I can click on that one, the details are there. Click on this one, whatever details are there. Change View again, we have Active Task, Task for Today, Next seven days, and so on. Assigned Tasks shows me Tasks that I still have an interest on, but are actually Assigned to somebody else. So in this case, we’ve got this High Importance Task assigned to Don Anderton at the moment. That makes sure I don’t forget that Don’s got that Task to do for me. One of the things we like to do a lot is to complete Tasks. If I take the first one in the list here, Sort out Categories, and I want to complete it I can either wind this up to 100% or I can merely click on Mark Complete. That Task is now struck through and as far as Outlooks concerned, it’s complete. And finally, as with Emails, if we have a particular Task we click on it in the list and right click, we have a Menu with the main options, including Quick Print, Print a Copy of the Task, Forward it, Mark it Complete, Assign it. We can Re-name it, change the description of the Task, Categorize it, Mark it up for Follow-up, or Delete it. So again that right click, Short Menu of the main options is really useful. So we’ve covered all the main features of Tasks now.

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Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Forward/Edit/Group Contacts Toby: Welcome back. In this section, we’re going to look at Contacts in quite a bit more detail. And we’re going to start with a Contact that I’ve setup for my colleague Don Anderton and we saw how to do the basic Contact setup earlier on in the course so no need to go over that again now. I’ve put in a few key things. I’ve put in a Picture, Company name, job title, Email Address, a couple of phone numbers, and so on. The sort of basic information you’re likely to have about any Contact. However, there’s actually quite a bit more that you can hold and there’s quite a bit more that you can generate. So we’re going to look at both of those things. Let’s start with the generation of information. One very useful aspect of a Contact is being able to pass the details on to somebody else, and you can do that in a number of ways. For instance, I could Forward this information on to somebody else either as a Business Card or in the standard internet format which is V-Card Format. Outlook handles V-Card Format very easily and if you Forward that detail on to somebody else who used Outlook they’ll be able to take that V-Card information and load that Contacts details into their own copy of Outlook. You can actually Send it to somebody who’s got Outlook as an Outlook Contact, which is also very straightforward. But we’re going to look now at the Business Card option because that’s quite a neat one. And in fact with Don’s information still selected, if I click on Business Card I actually get a Dialog that helps me Edit a Business Card for Don. Let’s have a look at what we can do with that. So let’s do some work on Don’s Business Card. This Dialog is really in four sections. There’s a Preview of the Business Card on the top left. There is some Design Controls on the top right, Fields on the bottom left and some Text Formatting and other Controls on the bottom right. Starting at the top right with the Design Controls; we currently have Layout Image Left. We could change it, for instance, to Image Right or Image Bottom, or even Text Only, and that pretty much summarizes how this Dialog works. We change the Controls in each of the sections and look at the Preview. I’m going to go back to Image Left. I can change the amount of space that the Image uses. Probably don’t want it too big because we lose space for the Text. I’m going to go back to 32%. I could change the Image. I could change Alignment and so on. On the bottom left, we have the list of Fields that is currently on the Business Card. I can choose other Fields, Remove some, or Move them about. Let’s Move Mobile Phone up to be immediately under his © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 name. Select Mobile Phone and use the arrows to move that Field up the Business Card, and as it Previews you can see where that Field appears. The lower right enables me to change the Text, change the Alignment, the Size of the Text, make something Bold, and so on. So once I’ve finished with all of the adjustments that I want I can click OK on this Business Card and from that point onwards, that’s how it will appear in the Business Card display for me for Don. But also if I Forward his Business Card to somebody else, that’s how it will look for them as well. So supposing that I wanted to Forward Don’s details to my friend Larry, I click on Forward as a Business Card, type Larry’s Address in there. In fact it comes up pretty quickly anyway. And, of course, the details in the Format that I’ve just decided with the Mobile Phone Number immediately under the name appeared and I can Send that straight on to Larry. We’re now going to move on to another very useful feature of Contacts in Outlook 2010 which is the Contact Group. Contact Groups have been in Outlook for a long time and they’ve gone through a number of changes of how they work. They’re sometimes referred to as Distribution Lists, for example. But basically a Contact Group can be any grouping of Contacts for any reason, although very often it’s to make it easy to send out Emails to all of the people interested in a particular topic. I’m going to Create a New Contact Group for the people that are interested in my Microsoft Initiative Project and to do that I go to the Home Tab when I’m looking at Contacts and click on New Contact Group. Give the Group a name, which is going to be Microsoft Initiative Group and then I Add members to the Group. I’ve got a number of options. I can Add them from my Outlook Contacts List, my Address Book, particularly if I’ve got a different or separate Address Book, or I can Add a New Email Contact, perhaps somebody I haven’t contacted before. I’m going to work from my Outlook Contacts and the people I want in this list are Don, of course, who I’ve already given a Task to do, and Larry who’s been involved with it since the beginning, and in fact Fiona who’s not had a lot to do yet really, but we’ll give her some work on it in a moment. Click on OK and there are the three people in my Microsoft Initiative Group. I can Save and Close that Group and, in fact, when I look at my list of Contacts in List View, apart from the people with no Company who are currently compressed down like that, I have now a Microsoft Initiative Group. No Company, but they show up as a Group. If you look at the little icons on the left here, you’ve got an individual Business Card where the Contact is a person, but you’ve got two little heads where the Contact is a Group. It’s always a © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 useful way of knowing which is a Group and which is an individual Contact. If I want to change my Group at some stage I can literally double click here in the List View, the Group comes up, and I can Remove members. So, for instance, I could select Larry, click on Remove Member. Or I could Add Members. I can also, of course, Delete the whole Group. But for the moment they’re my three Contacts in the Group and they’re going to show you how to use that Group. One very simple situation in which I might use the Group is to Send an Email. So, for instance, from Contacts, New Email Message. Let’s suppose I wanted to give the Group an update about the Microsoft Initiative. So I’ve got a Message here, Microsoft Initiative Update. In the To box, I could literally go down to my Group which is distinguishable here with the double head and it’s actually in Bold as a Group, double click on that, and then my Email goes out to the whole Group. There’s a little plus symbol next to the Group here. If I click on that this will expand the list and just remind me who’s in the list. If you do expand the list like that unfortunately you can’t contract it back again. The Group still exists, you haven’t done any damage, but you can’t compress it back into the To into its original form. But sometimes it’s useful to do that just to remind yourself who is in the Group. I would then just click on Send for this Email as usual. The chances are that if you work with Outlook and you use Outlook at home as well, over a period of time you’ll build up quite a large number of Contacts and sometimes it’s quite difficult to find a particular Contact. You can certainly arrange the Views in the ways we’ve seen, in alphabetical order, Grouping by Company, and so on. But sometimes there’s just one piece of information you have and you need to find a Contact with that piece of information and somehow you just can’t remember which person it is. There is a very straightforward Search facility available when you’re in the Contact List View and if I click in this Field at the top with the Magnifier to the right. If I say No part of a phone number. Let’s suppose that I know part of the Phone Number is 1, 2, 1, 2. I just type it in and up come two Contacts with 1, 2, 1, 2 in their details. If I click on that I can see those two Contacts. So Don Anderton has that Phone Number as part of his Phone Number and Jason Humbolt does as well. Cleary these are made up Phone Numbers. So that’s a very useful facility to find a Contact. If I go back, Cancel that, go back to the Full List View, there’s also a Find a Contact button up here which I can use. And generally speaking between that and the ability to Sort and Group I should be able to find any Contact I need without too much trouble. © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 We’re now going to look at Printing Contact Information and this comes in two Categories. The first Category is the Printing of an individual Contacts details. This is quite straightforward whichever View we’re in. So, for instance, for Don if I select his Business Card, right click, I have the usual Menu of options. I can do a Quick Print here which is the easiest way to Print Don’s details, but I also have these other Menu options. I can Forward him as a Business Card, an Outlook Contact, or just as a Text Message. I can Create an Email to him, a meeting for him, Assign a Task to him, or Create a Journal Entry for him. Provided I have my phone system setup I can phone him on either of the two numbers I have. I can Categorize him in terms of his importance to me as a Contact. I can schedule a Follow-up. I have a number of other options. And I can also Delete his details when I need to. So note the Print option is the straightforward one for an individual. If I want to Print all of the Contacts, then I go to Backstage View and what I actually get depends on which View I have selected before I go to Backstage View. So we’re in Business Card View at the moment, enter Backstage View, on to Print, and we’re given a number of options for Printing. We can Print Card Style, Small Booklet Style, Medium Booklet Style, Memo Style, or Phone Directory Style. Each of those is worth you taking a closer look at to see exactly what you get and if you do need to Print out your whole Contact list one of those options should do the job for you. Well, that’s it on our run through of Contacts. In the next section, we’re going to go through the Calendar; a couple of outstanding items and in some more detail. I’ll see you then.

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Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Setting Up Meeting Requests; Calendar Options Toby: Welcome back. In this section, we’re going to look at some more features of the Calendar in a lot more detail. We’ve seen the creation of an Appointment in the Calendar and we looked at many of the options there, such as Reminders and inviting attendees and so on. In fact the Appointment we created was to do with having dinner at Larry’s house. This time we’re going to look at scheduling a meeting. Many of the features are the same as those with an Appointment, but there are a few important additions and the meeting wouldn’t necessarily be a business meeting. This may be of interest to you if you’re involved in a local club or society. Or if even if you just need get members of the family together to discuss something important. So on the Home Tab on the Ribbon when we’re in the Calendar Module click on New Meeting and up comes a Meeting Dialog. Quite a few of the options on here now you’ll be familiar with, like setting High Importance and Low Importance. We could make it a Private Meeting. We can Categorize it and so on. And you’ll even now have a good idea about Recurrence. But there are a few features that we haven’t seen before and we’re also going to take advantage of the some of the things we’ve learned recently. So let’s get started on this meeting request. First of all the meeting is about the Microsoft Initiative. So let’s make that the Subject and Larry has kindly offered to let us have the meeting at his house. And I’m going to invite the other people that are involved in this project with me. Now you may remember we’ve already setup a Contact Group. So I’m going to invite that Contact Group. So I go down to Microsoft Initiative Group, double click there, click on OK, and there are my required members. I could, as you know, expand the plus sign here to list the members, but I know I’ve got the right people in that Group so that’s fine. Now Don has got until the end of the week to complete his work on Chapter 2 and everything else is going to be done by then. So I’m going to look at early next week. Let’s say, let’s go for next Tuesday, the 27th and let’s do it straight after lunch on Tuesday; at 2 o’clock say. We need about an hour. So that’s fine. Now when it comes to actually scheduling a meeting like this there’s a number of very useful and interesting options available to us and let’s look at those now. Normally when we’re scheduling meetings, we want to be able to check that the other people are available for the meetings. Sometimes we do that with a phone call or maybe send them an

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Learn Outlook 2010 Email, but if Outlook is setup in a certain way and, for instance, if we Share Accounts on an exchange server, Microsoft Exchange Server that is, I may be able to automatically check each person’s availability.

Now unfortunately in this situation I can’t.

I can check my own

availability and then I’m going to have to wait on everybody else to find out if they’re actually available or, of course, I could phone them. But I can demonstrate to you the principle on which this works. And it’s quite straightforward actually. There’s a button next to Appointment that says Scheduling, and if I select that I get a Calendar display and all of the attendees of the meeting would normally be listed down here. And for any of them that I have access to their Calendar, it will show me whether or not they’re actually available. Now I don’t have access to any of these three Calendars so they’re all going to be a mystery to me, but I do know my own and I can straightaway see that I’ve got a problem because the time I proposed for the meeting I’ve actually got a Busy section. The sections on the Calendar are marked in this Scheduling Dialogue according to whether I am Busy, which is the blue notation; tentatively busy, so I may have another meeting that may be going to happen or maybe I may be taking the day off; I may be marked as out of office, which would normally be when I’m on vacation; or there may be a section where I have no information at all or even it may mark a particular period as outside of my normal working hours. For instance, if I work unusual hours or shifts or may be part-time. This is a straightforward case of me being busy and if I hover over that it’ll tell me in what way I’m busy. And in fact, I’ve got a dentist appointment, lovely. So I don’t think 2 o’clock is going to be a good time for this meeting and given my dentist I don’t think Scheduling it for after 2 o’clock is a good idea. So I think I’m going to move it to the morning. So, let’s try, what about 11 o’clock say until 12? Back to my Appointment; it’s changed the times in my Appointment and I could actually go ahead proposing that to my colleagues. Now before I actually Send out my invitation, I’m going to do a couple of other things. One of them is I’m going to decide how I want people to respond to this invitation. And under the Attendees Group a little icon here, click on the drop down. It’s going to say: Am I going to request responses from the Attendees? And am I going to allow them to propose new times? So if they can’t make that meeting, let each of them suggest a time when they are available. Well they both seem like good ideas in this situation so I’m going to keep both of those options checked. Another very useful feature here is to actually choose a Reminder time. Wide range of

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Learn Outlook 2010 selections; I’m going to look for Reminder a day before. So that’s fine. Now I’m going to enter a few details for the meeting and then I’m ready to Send it. So, I typed the details of the meeting for my colleagues. Basically saying the proposal will be ready by the end of the week. I’ll Send out a Draft on Monday and I hope you’re all okay to get together on Tuesday. The other thing I’m going to include in this is a Link to the latest update on the Initiative from Microsoft. You can actually include Hyperlinks in just about anything in Outlook. So you could include it in an Email Message, a Task, an Appointment, or in this case an Invitation to a meeting. If I go to my internet browser here there’s a Link there, the Initiative is the Shared Source Initiative from Microsoft. I click on the URL on the Microsoft Internet Explorer page, Copy it with Control-C, go back to my meeting request, and then I can just Paste that Link in. So there is the Hyperlink to the relevant page so that my colleagues can read the latest on this Initiative. And then I just Send out the Invitation. We’re now going to look at the options we need to set when we’re using Outlook 2010. If we go into Backstage View as usual, Options, and then select Calendar Options. The top section shows us our normal days working hours; 8 til 5 in my case. I could obviously change that. We can also specify what our working days in the week are; in my case, Monday to Friday, and we can say which is the first day of the week, Monday in this case. And which is the first week of the year; particularly useful is we do Week Numbering. This one starts on January the 1st. I can also specify that I want to show on Outlook the public holiday’s for my locale. My locale is the United Kingdom. Click United Kingdom, click on OK. Just confirm that I want that specified and there we go, and the public holidays for the UK have been added to my Schedule. If I, for instance, go to Christmas Day, there we are. The public holiday for Christmas is marked. Let’s just have another look at some of those other options. Go back into Options again for the Calendar; a couple of other important ones there. When we’re Creating Calendar Appointments we can set a Default Reminder, in this case, it can be set at 15 minutes before. I normally have my Reminder set a bit further forward than that because if I’m in the wrong place 15 minutes before a meeting it’s sometimes impossible to get there. Some people don’t like the Default Reminders at all so they would uncheck this. I would tend to have mine set at an hour. Allow Attendees to propose new times for meetings. Well we’ve already seen that in action when we sent out our Meeting Invitation to our colleagues about the Microsoft Initiative. And then there’s © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 a number of options here, which it’s useful to go through, check the meaning of each, check in Online Help if you’re not sure. There are some Display options here that can help us to Customize the Display of the Calendar in its various Views. And down here, a very important one, we need to choose our Time Zone. This is very often setup when you install Office 2010. Mine is set at what’s called UTC or Greenwich Mean Time, although to be fair Greenwich Mean Time now changes to British Summer Time in the Summer and automatically adjusts for Daylight Saving Time if you have Daylight Saving Time in your locale make sure that that’s checked as well. You can also, if you customarily work with somebody say in another Time Zone, you can show their Time Zone on your Calendar as well, which can sometimes help you avoid waking them up in the middle of the night with a badly placed phone call. So you can show a second Time Zone on the Calendar, select what that Zone is. That’s a pretty useful feature as well. So, again, as with many of the other options within Outlook 2010, when you get some time have a look through all the options, experiment with the ones that look as though they could be useful, and don’t forget to check in Online Help as well. One other very useful feature in Outlook is to be able to Schedule an all day meeting. As you saw earlier I’ve got a trip to the dentist next Tuesday and I think I’m going to take Wednesday off because I think it’s going to be bad news. So I’m going to Schedule an Appointment. It’s going to be called Dentist Recovery, day off work.

I’m going to Schedule it for next

Wednesday, which is the 28th and I’m going to check this box that says All Day Event. Save and Close and if I now look at my week, for this week, and then look at my week for next week the Appointment Dentist doesn’t appear against a time slot, it appears against the whole day. So that tells me that it’s a full day Appointment. And finally, for the moment on the subject of Calendars, of course, there are Print facilities. We normally Print from Backstage View where when we’re in the Calendar Module we go to Print and we’re offered a number of options. There’s the Daily Style of Print for a selected day. This will show not only the Appointments during the day, but any Daily Tasks and any Notes that are relevant to the day. Weekly Agenda Style where we can see some Notes and maybe hand write some on as the week goes through. The Weekly Calendar Style which shows us all our Appointments in neat slots. The Monthly Style, a Tri-fold Style where we can basically Print it out, fold it up, and carry it around in our pocket, and the Calendar Details Style. So there are a © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 number of options there for Printing. So that’s it on the Calendar for now. We’re now going to move on to some of the other reuses of Outlook, although we will refer to Calendar once or twice more in the remainder of the course.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Setup RSS Feeds Toby: Hello again. In this section, we’re going to look at RSS. There’s actually quite a bit of disagreement about what RSS stands for, but it’s generally accepted nowadays that it stands for Really Simple Syndication. And this provides a standard Format that gives Users a way to access content from podcasts, some websites and blogs, and more specifically for some of the social media that has become very popular of late. This includes things like Youtube and Linkedin. Some people could regard these things to be a bit of a fad and to some extent they do change quite rapidly over time, but sites such as Linkedin and the facilities they offer are becoming increasingly important in the business world. And whether you’re interest is in personal and entertainment or in business, you really need to get to grips with RSS and some of the things that it can do for you, and we’re going to look at that in this section. Now then, in order to demonstrate the basic principles of RSS Feeds I’m going to use an example and I’m going to use one of the News Feeds from the CNN International site. So if I switch over to Internet Explorer here, I’ve already got the CNN International webpage here. If I go down to the lower part of the page I come to a section that’s called Blogs. Click on Blogs and it brings up the most active Blogs on CNN. I think it puts the top ten there. You’ll usually recognize an RSS Feed by an orange icon. Sometimes it says RSS, as we’ll see in a moment. Sometimes it says XML. But as you see here if I hover over either the word Subscribe or the orange button, the Tool Tip says RSS. If I right click on that and then click on Copy Shortcut; now I’m going to go back into Outlook, Backstage View, Accounts, Account Settings. We’ve obviously looked at the Account Settings Dialog quite a few times before when we were looking at our Email Accounts. The third Tab is RSS Feeds. Click on RSS Feeds. We don’t actually have any Feeds at the moment. But if I click on New it says: Enter the location of the RSS Feed, and I Paste that with Control-V and click on Add, and that will actually Add this RSS Feed for me. Now it comes up with a number of options in the RSS Feed Options Dialog box. Use the choices below to configure options. The Feed name is CNN Political Ticker. Well that’s a good name. It then asks me where I want the Items delivered. Now I can actually store this in my Outlook .pst file and it gives me a path within that. Outlook Data File, RSS Feeds, CNN Political Ticker. I can ask it to automatically Download enclosures or Download the full article as an HTML attachment. I’m leaving both of those unchecked at the moment; I’ll come back to © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 those later. And then I also set an Update Limit, this is to prevent Outlook being absolutely swamped with Feeds from this RSS Feed and basically slowing Outlook down to the point that it becomes unusable. So I’m going to set the limit at an hour. You may want to change that at some stage. Again, we’ll come back to that later. Click on OK. I’ve now got my first Feed and it’s last updated on pending. It hasn’t actually had a Feed yet, so that’ll appear in a little while. Close that and I’ve setup my first RSS Feed. So having setup our first RSS Feed, what exactly does that do for us? Well, if we look in Mail in the top half of the Navigation Pane, one of the Folders that we haven’t looked at before is this one, RSS Feeds. And it’s been empty until now, but if I Open it up now I’ve got one Item in it, CNN Political Ticker, and this is Bolded and has 19. So, in the few minutes since we set that RSS Feed up we’ve got 19 RSS Feeds from CNN. If I click on that Folder there they are. Now if I just take one of them, let’s take the top one and double click to Open it up. I actually have my first RSS News Feed and this is CNN Washington Bureau’s morning speed reader top stories making news from around the Country. And here we have a succession of news stories. Here’s one, Sherrod offered new job, but says she’ll have to “think about it.” Can click on that news story and it takes me through to the relevant page on the CNN site and not only do I get the Feed but of course I get a Video which I can play, which will give me the essence of that particular story. So, that fairly short, straightforward illustration pretty much shows you what RSS Feeds are about in a basic form, but they can actually do quite a lot more than that, as we’ll see. Let’s now look at some of the options for reading RSS Feeds. Using the ones we’ve already got setup from CNN, on the Home Tab we have an RSS Group just here and this has three buttons in it. Let’s start with the bottom one, View Article. This automatically brings up a selected article in our Default web browser. So we don’t have to switch to Internet Explorer or whatever and it’ll go straight to the selected article. This one, Share this Feed, as the name implies if we have a particular RSS Feed that we think somebody else will be interested in we can Send a Link to the Feed to another person via Email and that person can then actually set that RSS Feed up in their copy of Outlook. So, for instance, if I say Share this Feed I could Send that to say Don and say, and when Don gets this Message he’ll actually see both the URL for the Feed there and also get this little orange marker. This orange icon with the white arcs on it is the standard RSS Feed

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Learn Outlook 2010 icon. So when you see that you know you’re talking about an RSS Feed. So I could Send that one through to Don. Now let’s look at the top option in this Group. If I select this story and click on Download Content, if you watch that area carefully when I click on Down Article what happens is that Outlook Downloads the article and presents it to me basically as a little Shortcut here and that article as an HTM, as an HTML File I can then Preview, quickly Print, or Save it somewhere on my computer so that I can read it separately and later. If there are Attachments then I can Copy the Attachments and Save those as well. The other thing to bear in mind when you’re looking at RSS Feeds is that the way that they’re presented is very much as though they are Email Messages. So if you want to read them in Outlook on screen, you have a number of options available to you. One of them, of course, as we know is that you can Minimize the To-Do Bar to make a little bit more space. You know that in the View Menu the Reading Pane could be actually placed at the bottom. You might find that easier to deal with and you can actually still scroll through your RSS Feeds there, but make the actual Reading Pane itself a little bit bigger. And as we saw just now you can actually double click to Open out a particular item to full size and, of course, as we saw before you can actually go to the Internet Explorer browser in itself or whatever your chosen browser is to read that particular story. So there are quite a few options to make it easier to Follow-up on an RSS Feed. What I’m going to do now is to add a second RSS Feed to this implementation of Outlook. I’m just going to quickly go to BBC website, News Front Page, Copy Shortcut, back to Outlook. You can see how quick it is to setup these Feeds. In fact, there are other ways to do doing this as well. And then back into Accounts, RSS Feeds, New, Paste it in, click on Add, BBC News Home, delivery location, etc. Click on OK and click on Close. And there we are. I’ve got a BBC News Feed. Now you may have seen there that as soon as I did that I immediately got 85 pieces of news. That drops straight in. Now you can see that’s actually going to be quite a dangerous thing because apart from the fact that I’m going to spend the rest of my life reading RSS Feeds, the amount of space and the amount of time that Outlook uses Downloading all this can become a problem. The other thing that can become a problem with this is the organization of all of this. We’ve now got these two News Feeds and we may want to perhaps Categorize these in a different way and this is one of the things that we’re going to do next. © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 So, in the next section, we’re going to look at setting up RSS Feeds to cover some of the other social media and also ways to organize our RSS Feeds to make them a little bit easier to manage. I’ll see you then.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Organize RSS Feeds, New Social Connection Toby: Hello again. In this section, we’re going to carry on looking at RSS Feeds and their management, and we’re also going to look at some of the more popular social media tools, including YouTube. Before we do that we’re going to quickly go back to our RSS Feeds Folder over here and right click, New Folder, and I’m going to give my New Folder a name of News. And I’m going to click on OK, and I now have a New Folder which is actually empty called News within the RSS Feeds. Now Backstage View, Account Settings, back to RSS Feeds. There are my two Feeds: BBC and CNN. I’m going to change the Folder that the BBC News RSS Feeds go to; from the one it was originally to my New Folder. And I’m going to do the same for the CNN one. And the effect of this will become apparent shortly when the next Feed Update occurs. The reason for doing this is this gives us a facility to organize our RSS Feeds in a way that rather than have maybe even dozens of Folders down here that we have to Search through, we have to organize and Categorize and put in the right order and so on. We can actually Create just a few Folders with key items in there. We may have one for entertainment and so on. And the other thing to bear in mind with this is that one of the dangers of RSS Feeds is that you actually get so inundated with material that you never actually read any of it. Or that it becomes very difficult to keep track of what is and isn’t read. And we’re going to look at that question next. Let’s go back to our original Folders for these RSS Feeds and let’s look at the first one. This is the BBC News RSS Folder and it’s got 91 items in it already in the space of, well within one day really. And you may or may not have time to read that many items. I certainly don’t have today. But it can be a bit of a nag always being told that you’ve got all these items to read. And you’ll certainly after perhaps a little bit of early enthusiasm on RSS, you may decide that you need to be a little bit more cautious about what you subscribe to. One of the very important things which differentiate RSS Feeds from Emails is you can’t actually Reply to an RSS Feed. The fact that it’s Bold there and waiting to be read, it doesn’t mean somebody’s waiting for you to answer them. It doesn’t work that way. And also if you want to get rid of a bit of the nagging part of it, if you right click on one of the Messages in the Folder, you can change Mark as Unread, Mark as Read. So any particular story that you haven’t perhaps read but you want to mark it as read, you can. And if you actually right click on the whole Folder, you can say Mark all as Read. Now © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 this works exactly the same with Email Folders. So if you’ve got a Folder like that telling you you’ve got a load of stuff to read you can always suppress the Message like that. And, of course, you can always Delete an individual item. In the same way go over to the list of items here, right click, Delete, it goes. Right click, Delete; same as with Emails. Similarly using the Shift key you could select a range, right click on any one in the range, click Delete. It gives you a warning about all items in the selected Group being Deleted, click on OK, they’ve all gone. If you go back to the Folder, right click on the Folder, you can actually say Delete All and the whole lot are gone. So that’s a very good way of tidying up RSS Feeds. I’m going to do the same on the CNN one and now I’ve got a nice clean set of Folders again. So, something interesting has happened while we were doing that. If you look back over at the top half of the Navigation Pane again, you can see that the News Folder has got 37 new News stories in it and, of course, these are primarily BBC ones to begin with, and we can see how our change of Folder means that everything is being delivered here as well. When CNN does an update they’ll appear in there as well. So that’s worked pretty well. Now we’re going to look at some of the other social media possibilities that we get with RSS, and we’re going to start with YouTube. Now this isn’t going to become a course in how to use YouTube, so I’m going to assume that you have some familiarity with YouTube and the concept of its channels. And as an example we’re going to use the White House channel. If you use YouTube that to go to a particular channel it’s normally like this, youtube.com/whitehouse. And if we have a channel that we want to Subscribe to, it’s quite straightforward, amongst the commands in Internet Explorer there’s the RSS icon. Click on the drop down, RSS New, and effectively we’ve now Subscribed to that particular channel. Subscribe to this Feed option comes up. We give it a name, Uploads by White House. Well let’s change that and just call it White House, and we’ll say Subscribe. Now in doing that, that has actually become a Feed in both Internet Explorer and in Outlook 2010. Now although we’ve actually Subscribed to that White House RSS Feed from YouTube, it won’t actually show up in Outlook at the moment because we have one other thing to do. You may recall that earlier on we looked at the RSS Feed options on the Advanced Tab and one of the options, the second one, says Synchronize RSS Feeds to the Common Feed List, CFL in Windows. When we Subscribed in Internet Explorer to the White House Feed, that was added to © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 what’s called the Common Feed List, and Internet Explorer is aware of the Common Feed List. If we want that available to Outlook as well we need to check this box, click on OK, and what that will now do is it will make sure that any items that are in the Common Feed List are available to Outlook. Let’s take a look at what that actually means. If I go back into my Account Settings I’ve got my Accounts. Look at RSS Feeds. I’ve now got extra RSS Feeds, ones that I didn’t add myself. There’s a Microsoft at Home, a Microsoft at Work, an MSMBC, and the White House Upload one. Each of those is Saving RSS Feeds to its own Folder. Clearly I could redirect them to common ones or Categorize them in some other way. And if I now Open up RSS Feeds again in the Navigation Pane, I can see that I have some items to look at. So, for instance, White House I have a number of items from the White House. Now because these are actually YouTube items, if I Open one of these up and have a look at it I’ll actually be able to watch a YouTube video and many of these are going to be briefings like the first one. Amongst the other RSS Feeds that we can Subscribe to are Blogs and Podcasts. Here is a website, Cinema Solo, which is devoted to one man film making and like many sites nowadays it has a Blog with an option to Subscribe to the Blog. Click on that. There’s normally a Subscribe to this Feed and one way of Subscribing to a Feed is to right click on a Link like this, Copy Shortcut, go back into Outlook, into Account Settings, RSS Feeds, New Feed, and then we just Paste in whatever that Link is. Click on OK again as an Add. Cinema Solos, a perfectly good name. Again we can change the Folder and click on OK. Close, there we are. There’s our new RSS Feed. Straightaway we’ve got some content and we can go in and start looking at the information that’s come through in the Feeds on this site. So that’s a pretty typical way of adding an RSS Feed for a Blog or a Podcast. We’re going to finish off this section with a look at one of the new features of Outlook 2010 which is the Outlook Social Connector. If I choose an Email from one of my colleagues, say this one from Larry. At the bottom there’s a little note at the bottom of the Reading Pane, see more about Mr. Larry Ross. People Pane, Normal, and here I have the People Pane, which we talked about very briefly before. And as I find out more about a business colleague, a friend, or anybody that I communicate with, I can actually Add Social Network Links for that person to the information that I store about them. And if for instance I knew that Larry was on Facebook, for © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 example, I can click on the Add button here and if I’ve got Social Networks setup already, they’re going to appear here. I’ve only got an internal SharePoint one there waiting to be setup. To setup new ones I click on this, More Social Network providers and that gives me a range of options. So, if I, for instance, know that Larry is on Facebook I can click on here and add a Facebook Social Connector. Similarly here, LinkedIn. Click on LinkedIn and I can put Larry’s LinkedIn details here. And I can build up a really comprehensive network of all of the Social Network facilities that my Contacts use and, of course, I can enter in my equivalent information as well. So in Outlook 2010 this is one of the moves that Microsoft has made to really start to use the Social Networking facilities offered by LinkedIn, Facebook, and so on.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Junk Mail Options, Dealing with Junk Mail Toby: Hello again. In this section, we’re going to look at Junk Mail or Spam as it’s sometimes called. We’ll also spend some time looking at Filters for Email and Searching through Email as well. It seems that Junk Mail is with us forever and despite various initiatives to get rid of it so far all that seems to have happened is there is some kind of Control in place which has stopped it completely swamping everything we do. One of the things that has really helped with Junk Mail is that how Internet Service Providers, ISPs, most of them seem to have put in place some kind of Filters to prevent a lot of Junk Mail getting through. But I’m afraid none of these are 100% successful and unless you’ve got a really clever ISP, I’m afraid when you use Outlook or any other Email management application you are going to receive Junk Mail. Outlook 2010 has got some good facilities for dealing with Junk Mail and we’re going to look at those in this section. In Outlook 2010 the basis of Junk Mail handling is in the Junk Mail Filter. With Mail selected, if it’s not selected don’t forget Control-Shift-1, go to the Home Tab and here under Delete is the Junk button. Click on the drop down. Junk Email Options and that brings up a comprehensive Dialog, the Junk Email Options Dialog. And we’re going to work our way through that step-bystep because some of the features of it actually have broader implications than just for Junk Mail. The easiest way to explain this Dialog is to look at the middle Tabs first and I’m going to start with Blocked Senders. This is the easiest one to understand. Email from Addresses or Domain Names on your Blocked Senders list will always be treated as Junk Mail. A lot of the people that send Junk Mail continually change their Email Addresses just to be evasive and so that you can’t use the Block Senders facility. But a lot of them don’t and if they have the same Email Address over a long period of time, if you Add that Email Address to this list they’re in your Blocked Senders List. And in fact, particularly with a corporation of friends and colleagues, you can Import Blocked Senders Lists and Export Blocked Senders List, and we’ll come back to that in just a moment. On the other hand, the Safe Senders List is a list of people or Companies where they are safe to receive, you know that Email received from these people is safe and you never want it to be Filtered out as Junk Mail. The Safe Recipients List, on the other hand, is basically a list of Distribution Lists and so on that you may be on where perhaps somebody send that list to a whole list of people which might look like Junk Mail but isn’t in fact. So, this will be

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 something like an Online Mailing List that you’re quite happy with and so on. So those three Categories are the first thing to understand. Basically Safe Senders and Blocked Senders. The last Tab is also a relatively easy one to understand. If we click on the International Tab, we can see that the Message at the top: Some Email Messages you receive might be written in languages you are unfamiliar with and don’t want to read. There are two main sets of options here and the first is the Blocked Top Level Domain List. If you never want to see Email from, say, a particular Country you can actually Block that Country. So, for instance, if you don’t want to see Email from the Netherlands Antilles, you could check there. And this is basically a list of the mainly two digit Country Codes that you can Block. So if you don’t want Email from Hungary this is how you do it. The second list, the Blocked Encodings List is also relatively straightforward; mainly it’s concerned with Blocking Email Messages that use unusual Encodings. I don’t know about you but if I receive an Email Message in traditional Chinese I’m not really going to be able to read it anyway, so I may as well Block those Messages. I have nothing at all against getting Emails from China in general terms, but I wouldn’t be able to read them if I did. And there are also some other types of Encoding like types of Latin Encodings and so on that I may not want to see. So again, there are two techniques you can use which will help you to Block certain types of Email which although it may not actually be Junk Mail, it won’t really be of much use to you because you won’t understand it anyway. Now let’s go back and look at that first Tab. The first Tab is basically in two sections and the top half allows us to set the level of Junk Email Protection. And I currently have it set at Low, and what Low means is move the most obvious Junk Email to the Junk Email Folder. You may recall that in each of our Email Accounts apart from an Inbox, we have a Junk Email Folder as well. Let me just Cancel this, go back into one of my Accounts. There’s an Inbox but there’s also a Junk Email Folder, which is where the Junk Email gets sent to. High means that most Junk Email is caught, but some regular mail may be caught as well. Check your Junk Email Folder often. And Safe List Only means that only Email from people on your two Safe Lists will come through. So this is the highest setting. It basically means if somebody isn’t in that list or that list their Email will not get through. High means some will, but mostly Safe Senders and Safe Recipients. Low is much less fussy. But No Automatic Filtering means that anything gets through except Blocked Senders. So if somebody’s in the Blocked Senders List their Email does © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 not get through ever. But if we have Emails set to No Automatic Filtering only Blocked Senders will be stopped; everything else will get through. Now the other thing to notice about this Dialog is that the Dialog is set for each of my Email Accounts. So on my Live Account, my Hotmail Live Account, I could have it set to, say, High, but then on my Gmail Account, when I’m in there, click on Junk, it can be set to No Automatic Filtering. And depending on the level of problem you have with Junk Mail in each of your Accounts, you may want to set those separately. Now let’s look at the lower half of that Tab. This is a very important option right in the middle, Permanently Delete Suspected Junk Email instead of moving it to the Junk Email Folder. If your either totally confident that your Junk Mail handling is correct or you’re so annoyed by Junk Mail that you just can’t stand to look at it anymore, if you check this box it means that anything that the system considers to be Junk Mail will actually be Deleted rather than put in the Junk Email Folder. One advantage of putting it in the Junk Email Folder is that you can have a scan through every now and then and see if anything has slipped into Junk Mail that shouldn’t be. I get probably hundreds of Email Messages every day and a very good proportion of them, certainly at least half, go into my Junk Mail Folder automatically and I would say that probably on one occasion a week or maybe once a fortnight a Mail goes into Junk Mail that shouldn’t. Sometimes I miss them, sometimes I don’t, but I do know that it still happens and to do this Permanently Delete Option you have to be pretty confident or pretty blaze about the consequences really. I always have that unchecked. The other three checked options here are Disable Links and other Functionality and Fishing Messages. Fishing Messages are Messages where people are trying to persuade you that an URL, an Email Address in the Message is something that it actually isn’t. So trying to get you to Login to something to connect via a Link to something that is a fake. So, Disabling Links avoids you following those Links. Warning about suspicious Domain Names. So, if Outlook detects that a Domain Name just doesn’t look right it will warn about that. And the other one is to do with when you’re Sending Email in that you can Postmark a Message to help Email clients distinguish regular Email from Junk Email. So this is a way that you can actually make your own Email Messages look more genuine. So there we are. They’re the main options. Now let’s have a quick look at on the day to day handling of Junk Email.

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Learn Outlook 2010 Right, I’m now going to look at three specific situations that I will often have to deal with. Let’s first of all look at one of the Messages in my Gmail Account. In the Junk Mail Folder, I have a Message which is actually from Google.com, so I’m not quite sure how that got in my Junk Mail Folder but I can certainly say that anything from Google.com is fine. If I right click on the Message, go down to Junk Mail, I can either say Never Block Sender or Never Block Senders Domain. So not just [email protected], but anything @google.com I will accept. So I’m going to choose that option. And the other thing is if I go back to the Message again, right click again, go down to Junk again. If I say this particular Message is Not Junk, the Message is actually moved from my Junk Mail Folder into my Inbox and then I can process it in the normal way. In this Account, the Hotmail Live Account, in the Inbox I have a Message from my own Gmail Account. Now again I would want to Add toby.arnott.1 as one of my Safe Senders. So I’m going to say Never Block Sender. And up here in the top Account, the Inbox I have a number of Messages from the Company Maplin. Well, they’re starting to annoy me a bit now so I’m going to Block them. So again, right click, Junk, Block Sender. Now in each of those three cases, if I go to the Junk Setting, so the last one first, go through to Junk Mail Options, go to Block Senders, and that Address, the Maplin Address, has been added to my Blocked Senders List. Looking down at the second one, looking at the Junk Settings, Safe Senders, Toby is on the list, and finally in the third one, click in there, again look at the Options Dialog, and there I’ve got the whole Domain. So @ means anything at Google is a Safe Sender. So that’s pretty much on it on Junk Mail in Outlook 2010. In the next section, we’re going to look at Filters and Searching.

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Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Filtering Through & Searching for Specific Emails Toby: In the last section, we looked at Junk Mail and how we can apply Filters to Block unwanted Junk Mail and to make sure that the Mail we actually want to receive gets through. In fact, Filters are a very useful facility in Outlook 2010 in a more general sense and particularly after you’ve been using Outlook for some time you’ve maybe got two or three Email Accounts, you’re using it for Appointments; perhaps some of the Social Connections that we’ve talked about. The actual number of Messages and other items within Outlook gets to a point where it starts to get difficult to find things, and the use of Filters is a really excellent way of being able to find the things you need at a fairly short notice, once you get the hang of some of these tools. We’re going to start by using one of the buttons that’s on the Home Tab when you’re looking at Mail. It’s over on the right, at the bottom, and it’s Filter Email. Now the drop down brings you a number of options, but in fact there’s not really a Priority on these options because they’re pretty much interchangeable. So let’s start with Unread. If you look over on the left, you can see that I have one of my Account highlighted, so it’s that Account that it’s looking at, and I want to see what Unread Messages I’ve got in that Account. So I click on Unread and in fact what it tells me is that there are No Unread Messages in that Account. However, if I wanted to remove the restriction that it’s just for that Account and I want to look at All Mail Items, if I click here, Try Searching again in All Mail Items, I’m going to find quite a bit more. So, having located all of the Unread items and there are a lot of them, largely because most of them are RSS type items that were Downloaded earlier. I can use the other buttons here to refine my Filter, refine my Search. When I did that Search this Search Tab was enabled with the Search Tools Flag over it and I can now use any of these to try to narrow down to the item that I want to find. So, for instance, let’s suppose that I’m looking for a particular Unread item or that I want to catch up on any old Unread items from last week. This box here has a drop down next to it which says Today, Yesterday, This Week, Last Week, This Month, Last Month, This Year, Last Year. Let’s see what I’ve got in this Group from Last Week, and it just shows up the items that are dated last week. If I went for Last Month, quite a small set. It’s currently the month of July and it shows me the ones from June. So I can actually successively use these other Filtering items to narrow down my Filter or Search. For instance, if I was dealing primarily with Email I could say who was the Sender of the Email and narrow it down even further. © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 So the Filter and Search facilities in Outlook 2010 are very flexible and they can help us to find Email Messages, Appointments, Contacts, Groups of Messages, and so on using a good range of criteria and we can normally narrow down our Search to exactly what we need. Amongst the facilities that are on offer are one of the older facilities, it’s actually been in Outlook for some time, but is still very useful. If I go to the Search Tools button here and hit the drop down, there is an Advanced Finder Dialog and this Dialog, which those of you who’ve used Outlook 2003, for instance, will know quite well, is one that enables us to very succinctly Search for a very specific item. If we start at the top of this first Tab we can say, I want you to look for Messages or any type of Outlook item or Contacts. I’m actually going to look for Messages. Where should you look? Well I can Browse. I’m not going to go for the Inbox in the Outlook Data File. I’m going to go for my Gmail Account. So I’m looking for a Message in my Gmail Account. The Message I’m looking for has got the word Microsoft in it and I can’t remember whether it’s in the Subject Field. It might be in the Subject Field and it might be in the Message Body. So I’m going to make that selection here. From, well it was actually From me and I sent it to Don. And there are a number of other options I could choose here to do with the status of the Message. Was it High Priority, High Importance? Is it Unread? So on. I can choose what Category it’s in and then there are some Advanced Options as well where I can add a number of other criteria. But that’s the basic things that I’m looking for. When I’ve setup my Search criteria, I click on Find Now and away it goes. It didn’t Find anything. So, maybe I didn’t Send it to Don, perhaps, yeah maybe, maybe it wasn’t Don. Maybe it was somebody else. Let me just try without Don’s name and then we do the Search without Don’s name. Ah, that must be it. It wasn’t Don. I must have sent it to Larry. But there are some Messages. I think that’s it, the first one there, right click, Open, there it is. I sent the Message to Larry after all. So, I found that Message; a little bit of trial and error, but that’s typically what happens. There is an additional Search facility in Outlook 2010 which can be extremely helpful. It’s the use of Search Folders. Now you may remember that earlier on we created a Folder called Larry Saved in which the intention was to Save all the Email Messages to and from my friend Larry. And one of the downsides of that approach is I’ve got to remember to put them all there. Of course, I have setup a Rule that says when I write to Larry the Message gets Copied into there and when I receive something from Larry, Messages should get Copied into there as well. But there is a completely different approach which sometimes has advantages. I’m going to use this © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 other approach on my Gmail Account down here and if you look at one of the Folders within the Gmail Account, it’s called Search Folders. Right click and the option is New Search Folder. Click once and up comes the New Search Folder Dialog. Now this enables us to specify criteria for Searching Messages. For instance, we can say I would like in my Search Folder Unread Mail or I would like Mail Flagged for Follow-up or I would like Mail either Unread or Flagged for Follow-up. And there are, there’s probably about a dozen of these options, right at the end Create a Custom Search Folder. There’s a fundamental difference between this and the Larry Saved Folder and that is that with this we’re not making a Copy of any Messages or moving them in there. This Folder is effectively a View. It’s a way of looking at Messages elsewhere and more or less making a list of Messages that are actually somewhere else. I can specify where it’s going to look. So at the moment it’s saying look in my Gmail Account, which is the one I’ve selected. But I could say, Look in my Outlook Data File or one of the other Accounts. I’m going to stick with Gmail. And the Search I’m going to do is to say I want to see Mail From and To specific people, and the specific person I’m interested in is Larry Ross. So I’ve setup a Search Folder which will give me a set of pointers to Mail From and To Larry Ross and it will look in that Folder. Click on OK and there we are. It’s found these two items. Two Messages, click on either to look at them. And if I leave that Folder in place as I carry on working with my Gmail Account, as I write to Larry, receive Emails from Larry, and so on, wherever I put them, wherever I File them, they will appear here not as Copies of the Messages, but as indicators, pointers if you like, to the existing Messages. It’s important to remember that it’s only looking for Messages in this Account though. If I actually Copy the Messages elsewhere then it will no longer see them. And by the way, just while we’re on the subject here, this Search Folder shows these two Emails about the Microsoft Initiative. You may notice something slightly unusual about the way that these are presented in the Search Folder and that’s because they are a part of a Conversation and in Outlook 2010 Emails which are basically a backwards and forwards Conversation can be seen to be so by the arrangement here. So, for instance, the Heading proposal on Microsoft Initiative, there’s a little wedge to the left and a double envelope sign instead of the normal single one and this indicates that the Messages below it, which are slightly indented and with a dot here, are actually parts of a Conversation. Conversations are quite important in Outlook 2010, but they’re outside the scope of what we’re covering on the course. But you might want to read up on those © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 on the Help and a couple of other interesting points in relation to that before we finish this section, on the Home Tab if there’s a Conversation going on and you’re a bit bored with it, you’re no longer interested in it, you can click the Ignore button here and you’ll no longer be involved in the Conversation. And similarly, as you may know if you’ve seen these backwards and forwards Conversations before, you sometimes get to the point where each Email has so many earlier Emails that it’s saying RE and RE and RE and you have repeated over and over again, you can actually clean up a Conversation by clicking on this option here. But as I said, we’re not going to cover that in this course. So, finally when we finish with a Search Folder, if I’ve got no further reason to identify the Messages To and From Larry in this way, I can right click on the Folder, click on Delete Folder, and it says: Are you sure you want to permanently Delete this Search Folder? The items contained in this Folder will not be Deleted. Well, of course, that’s because they aren’t actually in the Folder, they are elsewhere and the Folder is just pointing to them. So to Delete this Search Folder, I just say Yes, and that’s it for this section.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Auto Archive Options & Manual Archive Toby: Welcome back. In this section, we’re going to look at Archiving. Now Archiving doesn’t sound like and in fact isn’t a particularly exciting topic, but it’s extremely important. If you’ve used Outlook for some time you’ll know that the size of your Outlook Data File or Data Files can grow quite alarmingly. And one of the issues in business is that in some cases there are regulatory requirements to keep copies of correspondence, including Emails, for several years. If you’re working with Outlook over a long period of time and at some stage the system fails and you lose all of your Messages, you could be in a lot of trouble; even if they’re just personal Messages where you may need to refer back to get people’s details or to recover information about a Conversation or maybe a receipt, an electronic receipt from an electronic purchase, for example. So Archiving of Email Messages, Appointments, Contacts, and so on can be very important. Unfortunately Archiving in Outlook is not particularly easy to understand or to do. But I’m going to try and explain it quite clearly and if you follow the steps here, you’ll find it’s actually reasonably straightforward. First of all, let’s go into Backstage View and do some basic setup for Archiving. Go to Options, go to Advanced, and halfway down the first sheet Auto Archive, click on Auto Archive Settings. We then have the Auto Archive Dialog and there are a number of things on this to explain. First of all, if you want to run Auto Archive, that is to let Outlook automatically Archive for you on a regular basis, you need to check that box which in turn enables all of the other options in this Dialog. And the first decision to make is how often you want your Outlook content Archived. It Defaults to every 14 days which is probably not a bad option. But it’s worth bearing in mind that when our Archiving runs, depending on the size of your Outlook Data, there may be a brief delay or even a slowdown in service while the Auto Archive takes place. So that’s quite an important decision to make, first of all. Now one very important thing to note about this Dialog is that many people actually prefer to do their Archiving Manually. One of the reasons for this is that the Auto Archive doesn’t run just when you don’t want it to and get in the way of you doing something urgent or important, but also some people think it gives them more control over what’s going on. But we’re just going to look at the Auto Archive facility now and look at the Manual option in a little while. The main

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Learn Outlook 2010 options to choose here are first of all how old are things going to have to be before you Archive them? The Default is six months, which is a pretty good figure; although you can change that here and specify a time in months, weeks, or days. The second important thing is where do you want the items moved to? Now it actually created a File called Archive.pst. You may recall here we’ve already got an Outlook.pst which is our main Outlook Data File and a .pst file for one of our Email Accounts. Well now we’ll have an Archive.pst. It’s in the same Folder as those. As with the Outlook File, as we’ll see later on, very important that this gets backed up as part of your normal backup routine. So, you can either choose the Default location or you can choose somewhere else. The other thing that’s important, and again we’re going to come back to this in a few minutes, is do we want to apply this setting to all Folders? You do not have to Archive everything, Mail, Contacts, Appointments, and so on. You can Archive some things and not other things. And we’re going to look at how we change the settings for individual Folders in just a moment. But given that all these all seem pretty reasonable settings I’m going to run with these for now. Okay, having set those, let’s go back and look at some individual Archiving Rules. I’m going to start with my Inbox in my Outlook Data File. If I select that and then on the Folder Tab click on Auto Archive Settings, it takes me into the Properties Dialog for the Inbox and selects the third Tab, which is the Auto Archive Tab. And there are actually three options here. One of them is Do not Archive items in this Folder, which as the name implies means that we’re not going to Archive these items at all. We can say Archive items in this Folder using the Default Settings. Now, of course, the Default Settings we’ve just chosen and they’re here, so we could go with that or we could Archive this Folder using these Settings and these are different Settings. So let’s do something slightly differently on this one. Let’s Archive Email items say after three months instead of six and move old items to the Default Archive Folder. That’s fine, which is going to be our Archive.pst file. Yeah, let’s stick with the same of the Settings on here. Apply and then OK and I’ve set the Archiving, Auto Archiving Settings there. I said earlier on that Archiving is seen by many people as being quite confusing and complicated. And I’m now going to explain some of the reasons why people think that and also give you a few pointers of how to make it work a little bit more for you rather than against you. Fundamentally I think that Archiving is an excellent idea, but you do need to be careful. And I’m going to give © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 you a couple of examples of why. I’ve just set the Inbox, just recall Inbox, Folder, Auto Archive. It’s got bespoke Archiving Settings, which is fine. If I look at Larry Saved, the Folder I created a while ago, and check the Auto Archive Settings for that it has Do not Archive. When you create a New Email Folder, the Default it gets is to not Archive. And you might want to make part of your routine when you create a New Folder just setting it to Archive by Default because I think that’s a much more sensible setting myself. On the other hand, if you look at the Deleted items Folder and check the Auto Archiving Settings on that that does have Archive Settings set, Default Archive Settings. Now if you think about it that’s actually quite dangerous because it means that if you don’t empty out your Deleted items Folder on a regular basis and say let it build up thinking that it’s actually quite useful having those Deleted items there in case you’ve Deleted something by accident or you need to refer back to something. What that actually means is that on a regular basis you’re going to Archive your Deleted items and all those Messages and other things that you don’t actually want are going to finish up in your Archive. So I would recommend that as far as Deleted items goes you have that set to Not Archive. And I always have my Deleted items set to Not Archive. If you look at something like Calendar, click on Folder, Calendar Properties. Calendar is set to Default Archive Settings. And Tasks, Journal, Sent Items are also set to these Default Settings, which is good because I think that’s probably a sensible setting for each of those. So these are the main things to be wary of with Archiving. The other thing to bear in mind, which I mentioned right at the beginning, is that if you haven’t got Auto Archived enabled anyway via the Options in Backstage View, nothing is going to be Automatically Archived anyway. So if you don’t want to Archive things that’s the safest way to make sure that it doesn’t happen. Let’s now look at that Manual Archive. Go to Backstage View, click on Info, Mail Box Cleanup, click on that, three options. The last one is Archive. We have two possibilities here. We can say Archive All Folders according to their Auto Archive Settings. So basically do what Auto Archive does but do it now. Or we can say Archive this Folder and all its Sub-Folders; choose one of the Folders and do something very specific. Now I’m going to go to my Outlook Data File. I’m going to go to the Larry Saved Folder and I’m going to Manually Archive that. Now the Settings mean that I’d normally Archive anything older than the 22nd of April 2010. But I’m going to go for I think yesterday, just to demonstrate, and that means I’m going to Archive any items that are older than yesterday. So it should pick up a couple of things there. © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 I’m not going to change the Default Archive location, so it’s the Archive.pst. Click on OK and away it goes, and it’s Archiving and its Archived. So, Outlook should have done its stuff and Archived those Messages. Let’s just check. If I go back into the Outlook Data File, go to Larry Saved. It is indeed now an empty Folder; so all those Messages that were there have gone. So how do we check that it’s all Archived okay? Well, that’s straightforward enough.

We go on to Backstage View, click on Open, Open

Outlook Data File, Archive.pst which is our one Archive File. Click on OK and back in the Navigation Pane we’ve now got an Archive entry. Open that up. One of the Folders in there is Larry Saved and low and behold there are my Messages. And, of course, once you’ve recovered from the Archive and bear in mind that the Message is still there, if there was a particular Message I was looking for I could now Copy it, Recover it, Move it somewhere else, put it in another Folder to work on it, and when I finished with the Archive if I click on the Archive Heading, Close Archive, and that particular Data File is Closed, and my Archived Messages are safe in the Archive still if I need them again. So that’s a pretty good overview of how Archiving works. As I said at the beginning, some people don’t use it because they find it a little bit complicated and scary. I really think it’s not that bad and I think once you get the hang of it, it’s a virtually indispensible facility because it means not only that you can keep the size of your Outlook Files down but that you can guard yourself against losing important Messages, Appointments, etc.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010

Video: Email Security & Maintenance Toby: Welcome back. This is the last section in our course and we’re going to look at issues related to Security and Maintenance in Outlook. And we’re going to start with one of the most vexed questions that we come across with Outlook and that is Backup. Outlook has been around for a long time, but it has no inbuilt facility to Backup the Data that you’re constantly creating by using Outlook. There are some services available, including online services where you can Upload your Outlook Data to secure online storage and, of course, a lot of people where they’re using Outlook say via Microsoft Exchange at work have Data Backup built in. But for the majority of people who are using Outlook at home or at home and at work, they have to make their own arrangements for Backup of their Data. The actual required arrangements are not that complicated. If we go back to Backstage View and click on Account Settings again and go into Data Files, basically what we need to Backup are these Files, Outlook.pst for the Outlook Data File and a .pst file here for each of my Accounts. Of course, I can point any of these Accounts to Share .pst files and so on. We may well, of course, have an Archived.pst as well, as discussed earlier. And if you’re using Exchange you may have what’s called an .ost file for offline use of Exchange, when you’re not actually connected to the Exchange server at work. And basically what you need to do to do Backup is to take a Copy of each of these Files, on a regular basis, and put it somewhere safe. The main sort of fly in the ointment at this, the thing that makes it difficult, is that Outlook must me Closed while you’re actually making this Copy of these Files. So the procedure you need to follow is something like make sure you’ve got a list of these Files, Close Outlook, Copy each of the Files, even to a Memory Stick or another Hard Drive on your computer, and then say on to a Writable DVD, take a Copy of each of those and then if the worst happens and your Outlook system fails or your laptop Hard Drive crashes or is unrecoverable you can start Outlook again using a Copy of your .pst File. Obviously you need to do this Copy of the Files on a regular basis or you may have lost several days work. So you do need to setup a Backup facility for Outlook in your situation, but I’m afraid you’re pretty much on your own with that. So, every Outlook User should have an effective Backup regime in place, making sure that .pst files, .ost files, and anything else that’s essential to the use of Outlook is backed up on a very regular basis. Another absolutely essential part of being an Outlook User is having an effective © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 Anti-virus software solution in place. There are a number of packages available. There are some well-known commercial packages, but also Microsoft now offers Security Essentials, which is a free Anti-virus solution, and there are actually other free Anti-virus solutions as well. So there really is no excuse not to have Anti-virus software in place. Although Junk Email is often quite harmless and really is just Junk trying to sell you something, some Junk Email carries viruses and if your Junk Email solution does not prevent those viruses from getting on to your computer all sorts of damage can ensue. Viruses can do things like actually disable your computer or disable part of the function of your computer. But viruses can also find, retrieve, and publish personal information about you, such as credit card details and so on. So you really must have an Anti-virus solution in place. Let’s now look at another very useful Security Tool with Outlook 2010. If we go back into Backstage View and our Account Settings and go to Data Files and let’s look at the Outlook Data File itself and look at its Settings. Apart from the name of the File or the name that we refer to it, the actual physical File Name and so on, we have another option here which is Change Password. And, in fact, you can actually put a Password on your Outlook.pst file and in fact any of your other .pst files, which prevents others who don’t know the Password from getting into your Outlook File and looking at your Email, Appointments, and so on. I currently don’t have a Password on this Outlook File. I’m going to put one on now. Obviously I type it in and it does an Echo and then to make sure I’ve typed it correctly and not typed it incorrectly, which will cause me a lot of trouble. I type the Password again in the Verify Password, click on OK, click on OK, Close, and now I’m going to Close Outlook down and Open it up again in just a moment. So, when I start to Open Outlook again it asks me for my Password and it will only let me in if I know what the Password is. Now, of course, you may well find that a little bit tedious every time you want to start Outlook, having to type a Password in. So there’s a way of making this a little bit easier for you and that is if I just Close Outlook again, when the Send and Receive has finished at the bottom here. I’m going to Close it again and Open it again, go through the same procedure. But this time when I put the Password in I’m going to check this little box here, which says Save this Password in your Password List. When a Windows User is working, certainly with Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP, Windows maintains a Password List and all the time that you’re Logged in as you, so you know your Windows Password, you have © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 access to your Windows Password List. And if I check this box it means that the next time I try to Open Outlook it will see if I have the correct Password for this Outlook Data File and if I have, it won’t ask me to enter that Password again. So I click on OK now, which lets me in. I Close Outlook again and try to start it again and this time because it knows that I’ve got the correct Password in my Password List it lets me straight in. Somebody else trying Open my .pst file, not Logged in as me, would not be able to do that without my Password. We’re now coming towards the end of this course and I’m going to quickly go through some of the topics that we haven’t covered or haven’t covered in detail and you may well find that with some of these you want to find out more either with Help or perhaps getting somebody at work to help you to setup your implementation of Outlook to be able to cover these things yourself. I’m going to start by going to the Options again and into the Trust Center. We were just talking about Security issues. There are one or two other very important things here that may be of interest or use to you. I was talking about Email Security; if you want true Email Security with somebody at work or perhaps with a customer or supplier, then you may well want to use Encrypted Email where even if the Email is intercepted, nobody else can actually interpret what it says. In order to do this, you need to get setup with Digital IDs and you’d need to cooperate with the person who you’re communicating with using Encrypted Email. There’s a little bit of effort to set that up, but depending on the sort of work you do, it may be absolutely essential to be able to do that. So that’s certainly one thing to be aware of. While I was talking about a work context for the use of Outlook, if you have Microsoft Exchange Server at work you may be required to Link your implementation of Outlook to Exchange Server and the support team at work should be able to help you to do that. The specific requirements and setup for the version of Exchange Server and the version of Outlook, we couldn’t possibly cover all of those combinations on a course like this, but if you do access Exchange from Outlook there are some interesting additional functions that you should have access to. You should be able to use Outlook Web Access and I mentioned before using Exchange offline with .ost files and so on. Other specific and useful things that you may well be able to use in relation to work are the Mobile Settings here where you can setup not only a Mobile Access to Exchange, but you can setup for Text Messaging and so on. So again, very useful facilities that you may be able to setup with additional Accounts and probably additional support from work. © Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Outlook 2010 If we look at the Advanced Tab in Options, we can see some of the other things that we didn’t cover on this course, including Options for Developers and the use of Custom Forms, Handling Dial-up Connections. They’re rarely needed nowadays, but still occasionally people have to rely on a Dial-up Connection. And if we go to Language the use of multiple Language, different Languages; mine Defaults to English UK. You may need to use an alternative Language or maybe more than one Language. But overall we’ve covered almost all of the things that you’re most likely to need to use to take full advantage of Outlook 2010s many, very useful, and very flexible features. I think the best hint I can give you as we come to the close of the course is don’t be afraid to look at the Outlook Options, work your way through those. In relation to the course try to make sure what each of them does. But also use the Online Help, go to Office.com on a regular basis to see what additional features and facilities Microsoft have made available and use the resources of the internet if you run into a particular problem to look for possible solutions or work-a-rounds to deal with the difficulty you’re having. I hope that you’ve enjoyed the course. I’ve certainly enjoyed providing it for you and that you and Outlook have a very long and fruitful relationship. I’ll see you again.

© Copyright 2008-2012 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.