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Learn Word 2013

Table of Contents Chapter 1 – Introduction Acquiring Word 2013; Information about Installing and Upgrading ......................7 What’s New ...........................................................................................................12 Chapter 2 – Using Touch Overview of Principles ..........................................................................................16 Chapter 3 – Getting Started Starting and Exiting; Templates; Creating, Opening and Saving Documents .......18 Word Workspace; Backstage View .......................................................................22 Chapter 4 – Help Online and Offline Help.........................................................................................26 Chapter 5 – Word Options Settings and Preferences ........................................................................................30 Chapter 6 – The Ribbon and Toolbars The Ribbon.............................................................................................................35 Quick Access Toolbar ............................................................................................40 Mini Toolbar/Bar ...................................................................................................42 Chapter 7 – Backup, AutoSave and AutoRecover Setting Up AutoSave and AutoRecover Preferences .............................................43 Chapter 8 – Entering and Editing Data Typing, Editing, and Deleting Text; Customizing Status Bar ...............................47

Navigation; Word Wrapping; Making a Selection ................................................52 Inserting Symbols, Date and Time, and Document Property ................................56 Chapter 9 – Copy, Cut and Paste Various Methods of Copying, Cutting and Pasting ...............................................59 Chapter 10 – Navigation and Find Uses of Navigation Pane ........................................................................................65 Find and Replace; Go to ........................................................................................68 Chapter 11 – Keyboard Shortcuts Keyboard Shortcuts and Key Tips .........................................................................71 Chapter 12 – Views Print Layout, Web Layout and Draft Views; Ruler and Gridlines; Split and Switch Windows ............................................................................................................................75

Zoom ......................................................................................................................79 Read Mode .............................................................................................................81 Chapter 13 – Spell Checker Spelling and Grammar Errors; Language Settings ................................................84 AutoCorrect; Proofing Settings; Spell Checking ...................................................88 Chapter 14 – Formatting Fonts, Font Size, and Font Colors; Text Effects and Text Highlight ....................93 Alignment; Line and Paragraph Spacing; Indent ...................................................98 Fill/Shading; Border Tab; Format Painter ...........................................................102

Chapter 15 – Lists Bulleted, Numbered and Multilevel Lists ............................................................107 Chapter 16 – Managing Document File Formats .........................................................................................................112 Chapter 17 – Page Setup and Printing Printing.................................................................................................................118 Page Layout, Sections and Margins .....................................................................124 Headers, Footers and Page Numbers ...................................................................128 Chapter 18 – Templates, Themes and Styles Using Templates ..................................................................................................134 Using Themes and Styles .....................................................................................137 Chapter 19 – PDF in Word Opening and Editing PDFs ..................................................................................143 Chapter 20 – Tables Creating a Table; Inserting, Selecting and Deleting Rows and Columns ............146 Formatting Tables ................................................................................................150 Chapter 21 – Graphics Inserting, Cropping, Resizing and Positioning Pictures ......................................156 Picture Styles; Picture Adjustments, Corrections and Effects .............................161 Online Pictures and ClipArt .................................................................................166 Inserting and Formatting Shapes and Textbox ....................................................169

SmartArt and WordArt ........................................................................................174 Screenshots ..........................................................................................................178 Chapter 22 – Charts Creating Charts ....................................................................................................180 Chapter 23 – Resume Resume Reading and Editing ...............................................................................184 Chapter 24 – Read Mode Object Zoom ........................................................................................................185 Chapter 25 – Mail Merge Mail Merge Wizard Part 1 ...................................................................................186 Mail Merge Wizard Part 2 ...................................................................................192 Chapter 26 – Collaboration, Reviewing and Sharing Send to Email; Post to Blog; SkyDrive; Invite People ........................................197 Restrict Editing, Comments, Simple Markup and Tracking Changes .................203 Chapter 27 – Long Documents Navigation, Headings, Table of Contents, Update Page numbers and Outline View 208 Chapter 28 – Desktop Publishing Watermarks ..........................................................................................................214 Page Borders ........................................................................................................216 Chapter 29 – Hyperlinks Types of Hyperlinks .............................................................................................218

Chapter 30 – Security Inspecting and Protecting Documents .................................................................222 Chapter 31 – Conclusion Microsoft Update; Closing ...................................................................................224

Learn Word 2013

Chapter 1 – Introduction Video: Acquiring Word 2013; Information about Installing and Upgrading Toby: Hello and welcome to our course on Microsoft Word 2013. My name is Toby and I’m your instructor on this course. Word 2013 is the latest version of Microsoft’s word processing package Word. For several years Microsoft Word really has been the leading word processing package around the world. There are many, many millions of users of Microsoft Word. In past times, there have been other very strong word processing packages like Word Perfect. And nowadays there are some strong competitors to Word, such as the word processing components of Open Office. But in terms of sheer volume of use, number of users, and the significant position that Word has in everyday business in every corner of the globe, really Microsoft Word is by a long way the leader. And Word 2013 is the latest in a line of versions of the products which pretty much corresponds to a new version of Word every three or four years. So let me talk for a minute or two about who the course is for. I really have, I suppose, three target audiences in this course. First of all, I want to target people who are completely new to Word, who’ve never used Word before, maybe who haven’t even used a word processing package before. I want to make sure that you can begin with a very basic knowledge and get up to be a competent user of Microsoft Word. Now I am assuming that you’re familiar with using Windows software in general and I won’t be explaining terms like what a Window is, what a dialog is, how to use a scroll bar or how to click a button. I will assume throughout that you’re sufficiently familiar with Windows-based software that you can use a Windows application in general before we start. The second target audience I have are people who’ve used Word before but perhaps quite an old version, something like Word 2000 or Word 2003. These users won’t have used the Ribbon Interface before. So I’m going to explain a little bit about the use of the Ribbon Interface early on and then hopefully with your earlier knowledge of the use of Word, you’ll be able to pick up everything else pretty quickly. The third group of users really are people who have used one of the newer versions of Word, 2007 or 2010. Now for those users

© Copyright 2008-2013 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Word 2013 they’ll be familiar with the Ribbon Interface, but I do need to warn them that the Ribbon Interface has changed a little in 2013 partly because it’s now intended to support touch use as well as keyboard and mouse use. So there’s probably quite a bit there for you to consider and I’ll be going over how to use the Ribbon with touch as well as using the conventional user interface devices. I’ll also for those more experienced users of recent versions of Word be talking about some of the new functionality. We’ll look at the main points in the new functionality a little bit later on in this section and some details of some of the new features later on in the course. I should also point out that for people who are familiar with a modern version of Word or even with one of the older versions of Word, there may well be areas of Word that you haven’t used before and I’m going to make sure that I’ve got a pretty broad coverage of Word in this course. Another important point to note is that until now almost exclusively Word has been used by people with keyboard and mouse. Increasingly now people are accessing Office components, particularly Word, Excel, some of the other components using touch devices. And in fact, I’m recording this course on what looks like a conventional PC but it’s actually a touch screen PC. And I’m going to be using touch screen at various points during this course. And for those of you that want to be able to use a touch interface, I hope to cover all of the essential aspects of using touch. The device I’m using actually also supports hand gestures in front of the screen. And you may well be using a device that will work with hand gestures. Unfortunately, when it comes to recording a course like this, hand gestures don’t really help very much because you can’t really see what I’m doing. So I’m only really going to use touch as the additional interface method alongside mouse and keyboard. Now to be fair, most of the time I’ll be using mouse and keyboard because for the vast majority of people, that is still the way that they use Word. But I am going to try to make sure that everything that needs to be covered that’s different using touch I cover. So let’s suppose that you want to try Office 2013, what are the system requirements for Office 2013? Well, if you look at the Microsoft.com website and search on system requirements for Office 2013, there are a couple of places you’ll find them. This is within the Office section of

© Copyright 2008-2013 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Word 2013 the site and if I scroll down the system requirements here, you’ll see a list of the versions of Office that are currently planned to be available and then further down the Office 2013 requirements. Hardware requirements; I’ll let you check through yourself but let’s look at the operating system requirements because this is very important. If you’re using a regular PC or laptop, you need to have Windows 7 or Windows 8 operating system. You are not supported if you’re running Windows XP or Windows Vista. So first of all, if you have one of those older desktop operating systems or laptop operating systems you’re going to need to upgrade to Windows 7 or Windows 8. Just for information, I’m running this course on Windows 8. The other option for running Office 2013, including Word 2013, is one of the later Windows Server products; so Windows Server 2008 R2 or Windows Server 2012. Now at the time of writing this, it was not clear what version of Office 2013 or perhaps I should say how complete a version of Office 2013 including Word 2013 would be available on the Microsoft Surface tablet. By the time you watch this, it may be clear just how much of Office 2013 and Word 2013 you’re going to be able to get on a Microsoft Surface tablet. I will assume, as I said earlier on though, that tablet users will be able to do virtually everything that I show you on this course and I’ll include suitable instructions or help as we go along. So some people following this course will maybe have already bought a PC with Office 2013 installed, some of you may have an older version, some of you may have no version of Office or Word. If you are going to install Office including Word, then you do need to make sure that the hardware you’re trying to install it on is up to the job. We’ve got the hardware specification there. And of course, I’ve already mentioned the fact that you need to be on Windows 7 or Windows 8 if you’re running this on a desktop or a laptop PC. Once you’ve established that the device you’ve got is up to the job, then you need to actually do the installation which may in effect, of course, be an upgrade from an earlier version of Office. I’m not going to go through the installation process here because it’s adequately covered on the Microsoft.com website, but I’ll give you a quick reference to that as it stands at the time that I’m recording this. At the time of recording this, Office 2013 has not yet officially been released. So there isn’t an official set of installation instructions. But to install one of the available versions of Office 2013, there are basically two places that you can look. There was a Customer Preview version and

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Learn Word 2013 although that Customer Preview version is now superseded the installation instructions for that which are on technet.com and you can find them by searching for that. Then if you go down the page, you’ll find that the instructions are pretty good; follows it through and there are a number of links within those instructions to other areas to help you with the installation. So that is one option, just to go over to these instructions on technet.com. And what is possibly an even more useful location for you is this one which is also part of Technet, but this enables you to download a 60 day trial version of Office Professional Plus 2013 which includes Word and many of the other components of Office 2013. And not only does this give you access to a version that you can download but it will also link you through to instructions to install that version. So if you haven’t already got Office 2013 installed, that’s a great place to go at the time I’m recording this and you’ll get 60 days use which hopefully will be more than enough time to work through the whole of this course as well using a free version of Word 2013. Now as with the previous link, there really is no point in me trying to go through the instructions here of how to install Office 2013. The information on Microsoft sites, including the two lots on Technet, are going to be much better sources of information about doing installations. And of course, there are links from there to various forums where people discuss problems they may have had when they’re doing the installations as well, which can also be useful if you run into trouble. So from this point onwards, I’m going to assume that you have a copy of Word 2013 installed and another thing that I’m going to assume is that you have access to the set of files that are part of this course. Now the actual name, sizes, dates, and so on may differ from these but there will be a set of files in one folder with names like ssi-word2013-example and then a sequence of numbers. I’ve also put a shortcut to the folder that contains all of these files on my desktop to make it easy for me to always find this folder and access the relevant example file. So with Word 2013 installed and ready to run and access to those example files, we’re good to go really. I’ll see you in the next section.

© Copyright 2008-2013 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Word 2013

© Copyright 2008-2013 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Word 2013

Video: What’s New Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at what’s new in Word 2013. I’ve already mentioned that the use of touch devices is a feature throughout Office 2013 now and, of course, Word is no exception to that; so one of the things that I’ll be coming back to from time to time is how to do things in Word 2013 using a touch device. But in this section I want to look specifically at some of the new features and functionality of Word 2013. Now there’s a very useful page on the Microsoft.com website in the Office section called What’s new in Word 2013. And that list with a little bit of explanation in each case, the main functional changes in Word 2013. So let’s go through the main ones now and then we’ll come back to each of them in detail later on in the course. Let’s start with New Read Mode. And this is a new mode that’s available in Word whereby virtually all of the, if you like, the clutter, the commands and so on, are removed from the screen and make it behave much more like a sort of a book reader. Now many of you can probably guess where the idea of this has come from and why Microsoft are promoting this approach to using Word. But as you’ll see later on it’s actually a really good feature because apart from the fact that you can just sit and read a document with it, you can also have certain tools still handy such as things like searching on the web, translating, and so on. That’s a very useful new mode in Word. Now if you’ve used Word before you’ll be very familiar with zooming in and out to either look at something more closely or to get a broader zoomed out view of a page or a couple of pages or whatever. Object Zoom is a new feature which gives you a very quick way of getting close up to something, so perhaps you want to look closely at a picture or the contents of a table where perhaps the text is quite small. Object Zoom let’s you zoom straight in close up to something and then when you finish looking at it close up, you can just tap outside the object and zoom back out to where you were before. So another useful new feature within Word 2013.

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Learn Word 2013 Now, of course, much of the emphasis with Word 2013 is on catering for online storage of documents, saving them in the Cloud, specifically on Microsoft SkyDrive. And one of the situations people are, in particularly, when they store documents in the Cloud if you’re working on a remote version of a document, it’s stored online, and you may well be using different devices in different locations at different times of the day yourself. So let’s suppose you have a PC at work. You may use a laptop when you’re visiting customers. You may use a different device when you’re at home. When you come to access an online document, a new feature called Resume Reading in Word 2013 enables you to carry on with the document exactly where you left off. And that’s a great feature, particularly if you’re dealing with a long document and maybe you just want to make sure that you haven’t got to spend several minutes finding where you are before you can carry on reading and perhaps reviewing a document. Another useful feature when you have an adequate internet connection, of course, is the ability to watch an online video right from within a Word document. So the Word document contains the necessary link to take you through to the video and when you’re at that point in the document, you can literally just play the video, as I said, provided you have an adequate internet connection at that time. And a very useful feature, particularly when you’re working with long documents, is the ability to collapse or expand parts of a document with just a tap on the screen or a click of the mouse. This means you can put a summary of a section in a heading and then let each reader decide whether they want to open the section and read the details. Many of the new and improved features in Word 2013 relate to working together with other people on documents. And this extends to not only saving files in the Cloud, but also being able to share files in the Cloud. And now there are good facilities for actually working on the same document as colleagues at the same time as those colleagues. So you can both work on the same file at the same time. Now there are some constraints and restrictions on this but subject to those, it’s a pretty effective way of working collaboratively on a document. Not only can you share documents on SkyDrive, of course, but there are extensive facilities generally for sharing documents using Microsoft SharePoint.

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Learn Word 2013 Another feature that’s important for collaborative working, and if you’ve ever done collaborative working I’m sure you’ll be familiar with it, is Change Tracking in Word. Now in Word 2013, there is a new revision view called Simple Markup which provides a clean, uncomplicated view of the document but where you can still see where tracked changes have been made. One of the very long standing features in Word related to collaborative working is the use of Comments. Well in Word 2013, you can reply to comments and you can mark the comments as done. Although the comments are grayed out, they’re still there so you can still see the history of a conversation about a comment. Nowadays the standards of presentation in documents are very high generally speaking. And more and more, Word which started out as a pretty straightforward word processing package is now seen as something close to a desktop publishing package. And in Word 2013, there are a whole new range of templates available and these templates have been updates for a modern crisp, clean look and feel. Now for a very long time Adobe PDF format, Portable Document Format, has been the standard for interchanging readable documents. And for a few versions of Word, it’s been possible to generate, to write PDF format documents as versions of Word documents that you’ve been working on. Well in Word 2013, you can actually now open PDFs and you can edit the content. Now many of the features you’re using Word are available. There are restraints and restrictions that we’ll go over later in the course, but basically this is the first time that you’ve been able to open and edit PDFs. And finally another very useful feature in terms of the presentation of a document is the new Live Layout and Alignment guide facility where as you move photos and shapes around in your document, you get a live preview of how the document will look in each of the possible sizes and orientations and so on. So there we have it. That’s a whistle stop tour of the new features in Word 2013, and it’s now time to get started on the course proper. The first thing I’m going to look at is the use of touch in Word 2013. If you’ve used any components of Office 2013 already, many of the features of

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Learn Word 2013 touch in Word follow the general pattern from within Office 2013 and a little bit of information about that available on the Microsoft.com website. But for the purposes of this course, I’m going to go over the basics of use of touch in Office 2013 generally first and then I’ll cover the specific aspects of using touch in specific aspects of Word 2013 as we go through the course. So, that’s it for now. I’ll see you in the next section.

© Copyright 2008-2013 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Word 2013

Chapter 2 – Using Touch Video: Overview of Principles Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. As I mentioned earlier one of the major features of Office 2013 is the extended support for touch screen devices. And during this course, I’m going to try to make sure that I cover the needs of touch screen users as comprehensively as I can. However, this does present a couple of issues. One of the issues is that I really don’t want to have to go through every single thing in the course twice, because it’ll take a very long time and the touch screen device people would get bored with having to do everything with a keyboard and mouse and vice versa. So I’ll really generally speaking I’m going to cover each topic once. However, particularly in the early stages, I do need to point out what the equivalent actions are. So for example, generally speaking when I say click during the course, I mean click with a mouse. Generally speaking that would be the equivalent of tap with a touch screen device; having said that, click and tap don’t always do exactly the same things as you will see. Now just to give you some idea of what I mean by this, I’ve actually got a Word document open here. You don’t need to worry about everything that you can see on the screen particularly if you are new to Word. Just look at this shape in the middle. This is a picture within a Word document. And if I were to click on that picture with the mouse, what effectively happens is it selects that picture. If I tap with my finger, it not only selects the picture but it comes up with a little toolbar. Now that toolbar that you see there, you don’t get that with the mouse. However if I right click on the picture with my mouse, you get a completely different menu. Now in the end what you can do using these two approaches comes out to be the same. But sometimes what you see, if you like the route towards what you want to do is different with the two approaches. Now as I said it would take a very long time to go through everything twice and show you all of the options, all of the things that might happen depending on which device you’re using. So I’m generally speaking going to demonstrate things using keyboard and mouse because that’s still the set of user interface tools that most people use. But particularly where it’s very different or where it’s very significant, I’m also going to show you the touch screen approach. And in the early stages I’ll tend to show you both, particularly when we cover a new type of what we call

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Learn Word 2013 gesture or we cover a new situation; for instance when we first look at putting pictures into documents. Now in terms of getting started with touch, there’s some help that you can get on Microsoft.com and there is help available both for Windows 7 users and for Windows 8 users. And there is also general information about using touch in Office 2013. Now a lot of the information specifically related to Office 2013, we’re going to be looking at a little bit later on when we start to look at Help. And a lot of the specific and in some cases common or general equivalences between clicking and tapping we’ll cover then. But in the meantime, if you’re new to Windows, you’ve a touch device, you’re not really quite sure how to some of the basic things, perhaps finding your way around Windows, then this particular page on Microsoft.com and bear in mind when I’m showing you these pages. But by the time you do this course, the pages may have been moved or replaced or whatever, but here’s a page related to Windows touch for Windows 7. You can also find equivalent material for Windows 8 and there’s also material related to touch for Office 2013. Now in relation to Office 2013, we’ll be looking at the Help on this a little bit later on, but there are some particularly useful items on Office.com. And if you look on Office.com, here’s a particularly useful article, I think, which particularly if you’re new to the use of a touch device, if you scroll down the page here it actually gives you a lot of information about specifically things like the Ribbon that we’re going to be looking at later and then how to use various user interface items, how to position an object by dragging, how to select text and objects, how to type, how to use the onscreen keyboard, and so on. So if you want a really useful, good guide this is more explaining why things work the way that they do and giving a good overview of the approach and then maybe you can look up specific details using the Help later on. That’s a very useful article I found. It’s got things about the minibars and so on. But as I’ve said already, whenever we do something new or different and whenever the approach or the effect is different, I will try to cover the touch approach as well. So that’s it for the moment on the use of touch. Let’s get started on using Microsoft Word 2013.

© Copyright 2008-2013 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Word 2013

Chapter 3 – Getting Started Video: Starting and Exiting; Templates; Creating, Opening and Saving Documents Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. We’re now going to take our first look at Word and the first thing you need to do of course is to start it. Now I’m not going to spend a lot of time explaining the options here, I’ll just quickly go through them. I’m running this course using a Windows 8 PC and I have put a shortcut to Word in the middle of the desktop here and anytime I want to start Word, I’m going to double click on that with my mouse. If you’re using Windows 8 and you have Word 2013 installed, it should appear as one of the tiles on you Start Screen and you could tap or click on that. And if you’re running Windows 7, Word 2013, once it’s installed, will appear on your Start Menu; probably in the Office 2013 group on the Start Menu. I suggest that you give yourself a convenient and quick way of starting Word each time. Again, in Windows 8, I’ve got a shortcut for Word 2013 on my taskbar and I just click that anytime I want to start Word 2013. Now when Word 2013 opens for the first time, you should see a screen similar to this one. And this screen enables you to do what are perceived to be the things you are most likely to want to do when you open Word. Now on the left there is a list with a heading Recent. That may be completely empty. In fact, if this the first time you’ve used Word, it will be completely empty. If you’ve upgraded from an earlier version of Word, then you may well see a list of recently opened documents here instead. In this case, there are no recently opened documents, so the list is empty. But as we go ahead, we’ll see file names start to appear here. And opening a recently opened copy of a document is something you’ll do quite often with Word. So if I work on a particular document, say a letter to a business colleague, if I then close Word, go away, do something else, come back, I’ll see that letter in the list of recents here and that’s a very convenient way of accessing documents that you’ve worked on recently. We’ll come back to open other documents a little bit later on. In the top right hand corner of the display here is my user name, and in this case details of the Microsoft account that I use in relation to Windows 8 on this device. And then in the middle, we

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Learn Word 2013 have the main area we’re going to concentrate on at first. If you look at these thumbnails, that one has a caption Blank Document; that one has a caption Welcome to Word; and the others correspond to what are called Templates. Now we’re going to look at templates in some detail later on, but let’s assume that the first thing I want to do is to create a document in Word, which is what we’re going to do in this section. And actually in this section, we’re going to start with a blank document. But as we’ll see in a little while if you wanted to start with a document where a lot of the layout, a lot of the style is already established for you, you can use one of the provided Word 2013 templates. Now if you look at these thumbnails, you’ll see that there’s quite a reasonable list of these templates here. There are quite a few. There’s some Christmas related ones there, various ones celebrating different events, and so on. But in fact there are many, many more than this and the section at the top enables us to search for online templates. So for instance if I wanted a template to use for a fax, I could type Fax in here and then do a search online for a fax related template. But more of that later, let’s concentrate here on blank documents. So click on Blank Document and what Word does is to create a blank document. So what we have here is the Word 2013 workspace. And the main feature of the workspace in many ways is the document itself. Now the document we’re working on, remember we asked for a blank document, is indeed a blank document. And within the blank document there is a flashing cursor just here, a vertical line. And the flashing cursor indicates where text would go if I started typing. So I’m just going to type on my keyboard “Hello World” and that now becomes the content of my document. Think of this area as a big white sheet of paper. We’ve just typed “Hello World” on to that big white sheet of paper. Now I appreciate that those of you who are using touch devices may be using an on-screen keyboard here. I’m going to come back to that later on. But basically when you’ve opened and started this first document, whichever method you’re using just put some text in there and you have now started work on your first Word document. Now the document already has a name. Every document in Word will have a name and by default when you open a new document it’s called Document 1. And the name you can see at the top on what’s called the title bar up here. So it says Document 1, Word. And if I wanted to give that a more meaningful name, I can do that in a moment. I’ll come back to that in just a moment.

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Learn Word 2013 Now basically what’s going to happen is that when you work on a document, you’re going to put words, text, tables, you may be reviewing somebody else’s document, you may be putting all sorts of multimedia elements into this document. But when you finished working on it you will normally want to save a document. And you’ll normally want to save it with a name that suits you are a name that you’ve been told to give it. And you’ll need to save it somewhere that you can find it. So the next thing we’re going to do is take this first document and just save it. Now many aspects of saving I’m going to explain in more detail a little bit later on, but let’s just do a straightforward save at the moment. To save a document, we go into something called Backstage View. So we click on the File Tab here, up here on the left, the dark blue in this case. Depending on your color scheme, you may have a different color showing. But it’ll normally be white text on a darker background, whereas the other things along here are dark text on a light background. Click on File and that takes you into something called Backstage View. Now within Backstage View, there are a number of commands on the left. I’ll be spending a lot of time talking about these commands, but the only one we need at the moment is Save As. Now you use Save As, the first time that you’re going to save a document partly to save it and partly to give it the name that you want to give it. First of all, the question of where to save it. I could save it to my SkyDrive. So this is effectively saving it in the Cloud or Microsoft’s version of saving it in the Cloud. I could save it on my computer or I could save it in another place. Now I’m going to talk about other places later. I’m just going to go for my computer. And if I want to find where I want to save it, I can either use a folder that I’ve accessed recently or I can browse.

I’m going to click Browse on this occasion and that gives me a pretty standard

Windows type browser. Now I mentioned earlier on that you should have the example files that go with this course in a folder on your device. And I suggest that you don’t save files like this one, these little sort of practice files in the same folder. And I’ve setup a second folder just to use for these exercise files. And as we go through you’ll see that as I save these you should have a pretty equivalent set in a similar folder. Now the folder that I’ve got for the exercises, the practice files using as we go along is on my desktop. So if I double click to desktop it’s got there, I’ve called it 0080-exercise-files, double click on that, it’s currently empty. So I’m going to put my files in there. And the first one, the file name, Word 2013 has given it a name, Hello

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Learn Word 2013 World.docx. Until you choose a name yourself, Word 2013 will normally use the first piece of text in a document as the file name to use. Now I’m going to stick with the name Hello World.docx here. So that’s okay and I just click on the Save button. My document is now saved and if you look at the top of the title bar, you’ll see now that was just Document 1 now says Hello World.docx. D-O-C-X at the end indicates that it is a Word document. In fact, it indicates that it is a Word document in a recent format, but more of that later on. So that’s great. We’ve made our first document, saved it. What we’re going to do now is to close the document. Having saved it, it’s still there. I could still do more work on it if I wanted to, but I’m going to leave it like that for now and what I want to do is to close it, to stop working on it. So I go back into Backstage View using the File button and then a little bit further down than Save As is a button that says Close. Click on Close and the document is closed. And now in my Word workspace, I have nothing at all because I’m not working on a document anymore. So having finished working on that document we may decide, well that’s it for now. I want to finish working with Word all together. If you look to the right of the title bar, right at the top of the window there, there’s a cross right at the end. And if I hover over that cross, you can see what’s called its screen tip. It says Close. And if I click on that, it will close Word; so click on Close and Word is closed as well. So in this section we’ve opened Word, created a new document, put some text in it, saved it in a known location, closed that document, and closed Word. So that’s a pretty good start. Join me in the next section about getting started to find out a little bit more about the Word Workspace. I’ll see you then.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Word Workspace; Backstage View Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to carry on looking at some of the basics of the Word workspace and also I’m just going to show you one of the other ways of starting Word. If you’re on Windows 8 and you’re using the Start Screen, there will be a tile for Word 2013 like this one. If you’re using a touch screen, you just touch once on the tile and Word starts up in the usual way. And one of the things you’ll notice differently this time is that our Recent Files list now has one file in it. It says Hello World.docx. If I wanted to open that one again I just click on that, the file opens, and it’s ready for me to do some more work on it. Now let’s take a look at some of the other features of the Word 2013 workspace. I’ve already mentioned the title bar at the top with the name of the document in it. On the left of that is a sequence of buttons, that’s called the Quick Access Toolbar and we’re going to be looking at that in detail in a couple of sections time. Below that across the width of the whole screen is the Ribbon. And again, the Ribbon we’re going to spend quite a bit of time on later on. The words you can see:

Insert, Design, Page Layout, References, Mailings, Review, View; these

correspond to the tabs of the Ribbon. And if I click on one of those, like Insert, the Ribbon has a different appearance with that tab selected. And each of these tabs gives you different contents, a different appearance. In the top right hand corner of the screen are a number of buttons, some of them we’re going to talk about in detail later on, like the Help button. But the three on the right are pretty much the standard Windows buttons: Close, Maximize, and Minimize. And of course, if you have the screen maximized this button, the button becomes a restore button which will put it back to the not maximized state, to the size it is at this time. Right at the bottom of the screen is what’s called the status bar. And again, we’re going to talk about the status bar in some detail later on. The bottom right hand corner of the screen on the status bar there are a number of zoom controls and mode controls. And again, more on those later on.

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Learn Word 2013 So let’s now go back into Backstage View and look at some of the options there because some of those are extremely important. Many of these we’ll cover in a lot of detail later on, but let’s just look at the important ones. Info, the first tab, and to access each of these you either click or tap on the name of the page here, so the Info tab. There’s information there about document protection and document inspection, which we’ll look at later on. But over on the right, we have Document Properties and these give the properties of the document that we’re currently working on. There’s some technical information like the size of the document and the number of pages, the number of words in it, the total amount of editing time, and then dates to do with when it was created, when it was last modified. And then we have things like the author, that’s me, who last modified it, that’s me. And if you click down on Show all properties, you get a longer list of properties that includes things like the company name, the status of the document. This might say something like it’s a draft version. And right at the top next to the word Properties, if you click on the drop down, you can get a look at Advanced Properties. Now let’s look at Advanced Properties. Advanced Properties, note the name of the document, Hello World.docx, gives us a number of tabs. The general information is on the tab marked General, then we have Summary information where I can put in things like a title of my choosing. I can put in subject, my full name perhaps, who my manager is, which company I work for, many other pieces of information. The Statistics tab gives me more detailed information about the content of the document in the lower section. So how many pages, how many paragraphs, how many lines, how many words, how many characters, how many characters if I include the spaces. In the middle, again, who last saved it, which revision this is, how much time has been spent editing it so far. And then I have information about contents and I can setup custom fields as well. So the properties of a document are quite extensive in Word 2013. So let me just cancel that. I’m going to go back up to this Properties button here, click on the drop down, and this time I’m going to click on Show document panel because with Show document panel what happens is you have a selection of those properties. The properties are generally referred to as metadata.

They’re information about a document rather than the

information that is in the document. So it’s information about a document. Some of the metadata is shown here on a panel above the document itself. This includes things like the

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Learn Word 2013 author’s name, title of the document, subject, some key words. So I might use something like if this was about wildlife, I might put the word Wildlife here as a keyword and then you can actually search a document on those keywords. I might put it in a category, I might use a status like draft or reviewed or final, and then I can put some comments about the document as well. Now sometimes it’s very useful to be able to put in the properties of a document with the panel above the document itself. When you finish with the panel, there’s a little close of the document information panel button there. Let’s go back into Backstage View and look at some of the other options. New is the option we use to create a new document. So if I click on New, I get that list of templates again and we’ll come back to that later on. Open; let’s me open an existing document. This is the option where I’m not necessarily looking for a recent document. In this case, the only document I’ve accessed is that one so that’s the only one on the recent documents list. But if I wanted to browse to find a document on my computer, for instance, I could click on Computer and browse from there. Or if I wanted to get it from the Cloud, from SkyDrive, I could get it from there. Save is the option to save a document that’s currently open when I don’t need to specify or change the name. Save As we’ve used already. So that’s when I want to save a document for the first time and give it a name or save it with a different name. I use that. Print option probably speaks for itself; we’ll look at printing later on. Then we have a Share button. Now Share we’re going to look at in some detail later on. This is a set of options where we can share a document with other people either for instance just sending it to them by email as an attachment to an email, but also letting people share the document online, share it in the Cloud on SkyDrive. Export, another very important option where we can export a document in a different format such as PDF format. And then we have the Close option that we’ve already used. Now right at the bottom we have a button that says Options and Options is the Word options. That’s an important topic that we’re going to come to in a couple of sections time. When you finish with Backstage View, you just use the button at the top, the left arrow to take you back into your document. And now it’s time to give you your first little exercise to do if you’re going to try and work along with these exercises during the course. You should have a document like Hello World. You

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Learn Word 2013 may have called it something different; you may indeed have typed something different into it. But whatever way you’ve got a document. That’s your first exercise document. What I’d like you to do is to setup some of the document properties, at least make sure that you’re author name is right and it’s in there. Give it a title, give it a subject, maybe some comments, and then I want you to close that document, open it again, and just make sure that you can see all of the information that you’ve added as metadata.

Note that in the top left of the Document

Information panel, Document Properties, there’s a drop down here and one of the options there, Advanced Properties, gets you back into the Advanced Properties dialog as well. So there you are. I’m going to put some more properties on this document and save it as example-01. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 4 – Help Video: Online and Offline Help Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at how to find Help in Word 2013 and really there is a sort of universal way throughout this version of Word for finding Help and it’s different from earlier versions. If you’ve used even Word 2010, for instance, you’ll be used to seeing a Help Link in Backstage View in the list of options on the left. You don’t actually get that any longer with Word 2013. And in fact what you’re looking for throughout is this question mark. It’s usually in pretty much the same place and there is an equivalent keyboard shortcut of F1. So if I click on this I will get Help. Now there are really two versions. There’s the online version of Help, the one for which you need an internet connection. And there’s the offline version that’s stored on your computer. As with most of the major manufacturers of software nowadays, the quality and quantity of offline help has reduced drastically with Word 2013 in particular, Office 2013 in general. So the offline help is very restricted.

I’ll show you the offline Help in just a moment.

But really to get

comprehensive help, you need to be online; you need to have an active internet connection. If I click on this question mark symbol here now, the online Help appears. Now to switch between online and offline, next to the word Word Help there’s a little drop down there. Word Help from Office.com, that’s the live version, that’s the online help. And then Word Help from your computer gives you the offline one. We’ll look at the offline in just a moment. Let’s stick with the Office.com, the online Help. Now the Help is browser based. So if you choose a topic, let’s suppose you go for the first one here, “See what’s new” which is the What’s new for Word 2013. I go into that topic. We saw this of course earlier on in the course, most of these. When you finish reading that, if you click on the Back button, that takes you back to the previous page. If in fact you’ve been beyond that, you’ve got a Forward button. So it works exactly the same as a normal browser interface. There’s a Home button, there’s a Print button, and there’s also a button here where we can switch to using large text. So if you have trouble reading what’s on the screen there, you can

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Learn Word 2013 switch to larger text and switch back. So when you’ve finished on a particular page you can click on Home or click to go back. Now on that Home page, you’ve got links to what’s new. You’ve got links to keyboard shortcuts. Now a lot of people still like to use keyboard shortcuts. I appreciate many of you if you’re using touch, probably not particularly interested in keyboard shortcuts. But there are a lot of keyboard shortcuts in Word 2013. I’m not going to spend a lot of time on keyboard shortcuts during the course. I will point out some of the more common ones. But there is a very adequate Help documentation on those here and you can access it from the Home page of the online Help. Now another important option on the Home page is this one, Learn Word basics. If you’re new to Word, then this is a great place to start. It will take you through all of the basics like choosing a template, opening a document, and so on. You’ll find that it won’t go into as much detail as I do, but it obviously takes a different approach in places and it gives links through to other useful documents such as this one which is the touch guide. Now the touch guide contains some of the most important information about using touch with Word 2013. It’s actually generally an Office touch guide, but the key points on it apply to Word. So it talks about the main terminology like tap and pinch and stretch and we’ll talk about those when we come to them a little bit later on; sliding shapes, swiping, and so on. But then it goes into how these things work in Office. There’s first of all in an Office program it talks about switching to full screen and standard view. This is to do with the size and visibility of the Ribbon and we’ll be coming back to that in a little while. Also the Quick Access Toolbar, we’ll be coming back to that in a section or two from now. Then it talks about how to use the touch keyboard. Now using a touch keyboard with Word 2013 is a little bit of a tricky thing because depending on your device, the touch keyboard can sometimes take up an awful lot of the screen and typing with a touch keyboard means you’re typing into quite a small area. But if you use the Ribbon wisely and the Quick Access Toolbar wisely and use some of the other tools and techniques of Office 2013 and Word 2013, you can make things a little bit easier for yourself. But basically it tells you how to show the touch keyboard. There will be a touch keyboard button on your Taskbar which you use to show it. How to hide the touch keyboard, tap the X button on the touch keyboard. And then dock and undock the keyboard as well. Then it talks about how to move around in a file. And I’ll be

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Learn Word 2013 showing you that as well as get some longer documents. How to make selections, again we come to that later on in the course. And then we come with working with shapes and objects. Now a lot of the rest of this relates to the use of touch in specific programs, Excel and Power Point in particular, and nothing very specifically for Word. But some of the issues to do with selection and the use of Menus and Contextual Menus I’m going to cover when we come to those points in this course. So if you’re a touch screen user, I suggest you look at that area of Help very carefully. Now let’s go back to Home again on the Help. We also have Help on using the Word Web App. That’s the App that you run online, accessing documents on SkyDrive, which doesn’t involve having Word installed on your local PC. And then the sort of main feature of the online Help is the search facility. You can type in a term that you want help on. Now the popular searches, the ones that Microsoft get the most searches on are these terms: Watermark, Table of Contents, Mail Merge, and so on. But if you just put in a term like that, so for instance let’s suppose I wanted to search on Thesaurus, type the term in, click on the Search button there, and it gives me links to various pieces of information; find synonyms with the thesaurus, where’s the thesaurus, and then some related terms that in some way have a connection with thesaurus in them. And then, of course, when you finish looking at the terms, you can either use succession of Back buttons or Home to take you back to the Help Home page again. Now I mentioned earlier on the option of offline Help which may be the only option you have if you haven’t got an internet connection. At the time of writing and recording, that’s very limited really. As the basic Help description says there, Use the search box above to find buttons on the Office Ribbon. So if I wanted to say search on something like Mail Merge in offline Help, it tells me where buttons related to Mail Merge are on the Ribbon and that’s about it. Now I don’t know whether that offline Help is going to be improved over time, bear in mind this is a very early release of Word 2013, but at this time it’s extremely restricted. And then I have just one other thing to point out about Help at the moment. If you’re working generally speaking on your documents and you are, I’ll say in this case, formatting a document and you get a dialog, you may be familiar particularly if you’ve used Word before with the idea

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Learn Word 2013 that in a dialog, you have one of the buttons says Help. Well generally speaking there are no such Help buttons in Word 2013. Everything now is pretty much one of those little question marks. It will appear in the corner of a dialog, generally up in the top right hand corner, often next to or close to the Close button. But it works in the same way. If you want help on this Paragraph dialog, you click on the Help button and it will take you into whatever the closest Help to that particular topic is. And then, of course, once you’ve gone to that you can go to Home within Help as well and then carry on as before. So that’s it on Help in Word 2013 at the moment. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 5 – Word Options Video: Settings and Preferences Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at Word Options. When you’re using Word, there are various ways in which you will need to customize it or in some cases, you may just prefer to customize it. Let me give you a couple of examples. When you’re using Word generally, you’ll need to use it with the correct language set. Now, of course, you could type in any language you like at any time.

But when it comes to

spellchecking, let’s suppose that you’ve typed in an amount of text and you want to check the spelling, you’ll need to tell Word which language you’ve been typing in and it will spell check according to that language. On the other hand, we’ve already seen screen tips. Supposing you don’t want to show screen tips, you want to be able to switch off those screen tips. You can do that with Word Options. But whether you do or you don’t won’t actually affect what you can do in Word. So let’s take a look at Word Options. Let me assume that we’re doing this with touch, although it will be the same with a mouse and click. If I go into Backstage View by tapping on File, right down at the bottom on the list there we have Options. Tap on Options and the Word Options dialog appears. Now this dialog has a number of pages and the names are on the left. So the top one is General, then Display, then Proofing, then Save, and so on. I’m only going to look at a few of those now, the most important ones to start with, and the others will appear at various points during the course when we need to consider the options that are included on each of those pages. Now one thing I should point out here is that sometimes we will see the Word Options dialog box without actually going into Backstage View. Sometimes when we’re performing a particular action within Word 2013, we’ll see the Word Options dialog appear, but more of that later. So when you open Word Options, the top page is selected, the General page. And in fact the General page contains a couple of the things that we need to look at first of all. Perhaps the most important one, right in the middle, is your user name and your user initials. Now, of course, you

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Learn Word 2013 could leave those blank, but they’re particularly important if you work on documents with other people, partly to identify things like the author of a document. But also when you’re working collaboratively, you will need to be able to track, for example, who has made a particular change to a document so that others can review their changes. Now the use of your user name and your initials in various places can identify your ownership of a document, a change you’ve made to a document, and so on. And in fact in some cases, you can do things like automatically insert your user name say in the footer of a document so that people can identify who wrote the document or who to contact about it; that sort of thing. So that really is one of the first things that you need to set; it’s to make sure you’ve got your user name and initials in there. Also in that middle section you have a choice of Office Background and Office Theme. More of those later, but if you want to experiment with the way they look and bear in mind there’s commonality across the components of Office, so if you want all of the components, Word, Excel, Power Point, etc. to have the same background, the same theme, then you can adopt a common one across all of Office or you could even make them different in each of the components. Now let’s look at a specific example, one that I mentioned before actually. By default in this top section, User Interface Options, it says Screen Tip style, Show feature descriptions in screen tips. Now there are three options with this drop down. One of them is “Show feature descriptions in screen tips”. One says “Don’t show feature descriptions in screen tips”. One says “Don’t show screen tips”. So let’s keep with the top option, the one we had before and I’ll just show you what happens. If I click on OK, I haven’t changed anything, but if I click on OK, if I hover over one of the buttons on the Ribbon, you get the name of the button, Text Effects and Typography, and then it says “Add some flair to your text by applying a text effect”, such as a shadow or a glow. And then it says you can also change the typography settings to enable ligatures or choose a stylistic set. So that’s the full content. That gives us the name of the tool there, the name of the button, and the description, the feature description. Let’s go into Options, on the General page, let’s now go for the second option, “Don’t show feature descriptions”. So this is the middle option if you like. Click on OK. Now let me hover over that same button and all you get now is the name of the button without the description. Now the reason that some people don’t like the

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Learn Word 2013 descriptions is that they can sometimes get in the way of what you’re doing. And for some people who’ve been using Word for quite a long time, they pretty much know what all the buttons do anyway and you’ll probably get to the point where you pretty much know what they all do and really you don’t need the feature descriptions. You may not even need the screen tips at all and one of the options that you saw just now was to switch the screen tips all together if you really don’t need them anymore. So here we just go for that third option, “Don’t show screen tips”. But for the moment I’m going to leave them fully on because it will help me on the course, although on one or two occasions they’re bound to get in the way. Now one of the other options I’d like to look at on this General page is the very bottom one, “Show the Start Screen when this application starts”. If you switch that off, so uncheck the checkbox, you won’t see the Start Screen, you’ll go straight into the Word workspace, although you can start Word with a document already open as we’ll see later on. But that is personal preference whether you want to show the Start Screen or not. Now I’m going to look at another couple of options within Word Options but let me just mention something else here. I’m not going to set you a specific exercise to do on this in terms of producing a new document, but I think it’s very important when we get to the end of this section that you take a little bit of time to go through your own Word Options, consider things like screen tips although you’re feeling on these may change as you get more experienced with Word 2013. But certainly make sure that the other settings that we’re going to look at now on the other pages are set correctly for you, and as we go through the course, you’ll find more settings that you may want to reconsider. So let’s look at another important option here. I’m going to tap on the Save Tab and right near the middle of that, just above the middle, there’s an option here “Default local file location”. Now this is the default location for saving files. If while you’re doing this course this is primarily what you’re using Word for, you’re sort of working along with the course, it’s a good idea to set the default local file location to the location where you are going to save the exercise files that we make. Now mine I have a file location setup to save these exercise files in for me, the ones that I’m using as we go through the course just to try things out. So all you need to do

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Learn Word 2013 is to click on Browse. In my case, it’s on my desktop and it’s that folder. So I just click on OK and that is now set as my default save location. And whenever I choose to save things on my computer that will be the default location. That can save you a little bit of time by setting that as well. In the broader context when you finish going through the course and you’re using Word in general, you may well leave that set at your Documents folder which is the default, the one that we had before, or you may decide that by default you want to keep your Word documents somewhere else. So now let’s look at another very important setting and the page under Save is Language. So tap on Language. This is very important. You need to choose the editing languages you’re going to use. Now, of course, with some languages you’re going to be using special character sets, Cyrillic character sets or whatever. For me I have two languages set, English United States and English United Kingdom. I work alternately in those two languages. There’s no reason that you shouldn’t have several languages set. And the behavior of Word will depend on the language in a number of ways. Now I mentioned spell checking earlier on and in fact setting up for spell checking is another exercise that we’ll look at later on, but in general terms apart from the fact that you may have a different character set you have things like the keyboard layout. You have a different U.S. and UK keyboard layout. Now in Office in general and in Word in particular, the list of available editing languages which you can access from this drop down here is a very, very long list indeed. And if you choose another language, all you need to do is select it, add it, and you can have another language, another keyboard layout, and so on added to your list of available languages. I also sometimes work in a couple of other languages. They’re not setup on this installation of Word at the moment, but really there is no restriction on this. The only thing you need to do is to remember to switch between them when you’re working on documents in a different language. So here’s another one of those little exercises for you. Make sure you’ve got that editing language or editing languages setup correctly. So just a couple of other small things to mention on Word Options, bearing in mind of course that we will be returning to Word Options at various points throughout the rest of the course. If you just tap on the Advanced tab and go down to the section, it’s quite a long section this. I’m dragging on the scroll bar with my finger on the right. Go down to the section Display. At the

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Learn Word 2013 top of the Display section, there’s an entry “Show this number of recent documents”. Obviously if you haven’t got, in my case, 25 recent documents, it’ll only show as many as you have. But if you want a smaller or larger number there that’s fine. And then a little further down, four or five options further down in that section “Show shortcut keys in screen tips”. We saw just now how to control the display of screen tips and the associated feature descriptions. You can also control whether any keyboard shortcut is shown within a screen tip as well. If you don’t use keyboard shortcuts then there’s probably no real need to show them in the screen tips. So there are a couple of the options on the Advanced page. As you can see there are many options on the Advanced page and even though we’ll be looking at some of them later on there are a very large number that we won’t. So you should really try to find the time to go through those. Many of them it’s pretty obvious what they mean. Some of them have a little bit of help, a little I symbol on the right, you click on there you can get some more information about what’s involved. But with many of the others, you may just want to experiment with them. Some of them won’t make a lot of sense at this point in the course, but as we get further on they should increasingly become options that you’re interested in setting correctly for you. So that’s in on Word Options for the moment. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 6 – The Ribbon and Toolbars Video: The Ribbon Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look a little bit more closely at the Ribbon. I’ve mentioned the Ribbon a couple of times and if you haven’t used a recent Microsoft Office program, you may be unfamiliar with the Ribbon. Even if you have there are some important changes in this version of Word and Office. So let’s deal with what is probably the most important change first. If you look above the Ribbon on this little bar, the top left here, the Quick Access Toolbar, there is a pointing finger icon. And this says Touch/Mouse Mode as its screen tip. And this is the way that you switch the Ribbon between touch and mouse mode. Now the main difference between touch and mouse mode is that when Microsoft looked at Office 2013, they decided one of the problems with accommodating touch is that the commands on the Ribbon, all these buttons you can see grayed out here, all of this, these are far too close together for many people’s fingers. If you’ve got fairly fat fingers like mine, it’s quite difficult to pick out a particular command. So if you click on or tap on that command, Touch/Mouse Mode watch what happens to the Ribbon. You get a choice between mouse where you’ve got standard Ribbon commands, this is optimized for use with the mouse, and then you get more space between the commands. So this is optimized for use with touch. So I’m going to tap on that, now watch what happens to the Ribbon. You can see that everything is spaced out much more. Now there is a price to pay for this if you’re using touch and that is that the Ribbon itself takes up more space on the screen, but I’ll come back to that point in just a moment. The first thing is if you’re using touch, you may want to have the Ribbon set that way. I’m going to set the Ribbon back at mouse mode. But everything I’m talking about from now on in relation to the Ribbon, etc. is exactly the same for both. It’s really only a question of whether you want more space so that you can tap on the commands more easily if you’re using touch. So let me just go back into mouse mode. So now let me open one of the previous documents. Let’s just open Hello World again. And let’s talk about what’s on the Ribbon. The Ribbon is effectively divided into what are called

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Learn Word 2013 Tabs and the names of the tabs are along the top here. One of the tabs will have this sort of rectangle around it. It’s sort of highlighted. That’s the highlighted tab. Currently that’s the Home tab. If I click on the word Insert, that’s the Insert tab. Design tab, Page Layout tab, References, and so on. Now there are in fact several other tabs and you can’t see them at the moment. They are available but you can’t see them. I’ll come back to that in just a moment. On each tab there are a number of Groups and the groups are the words written along the bottom of the Ribbon itself. So if you look at that tab there, the References tab, there’s a group on the left and it’s called the Table of Contents Group and it’s got three commands in it: Table of Contents, Add Text, and Update Table. The next group along is the Footnotes Group. Again, a number of commands: Insert Footnote, Insert Endnote, Next Footnote, and so on. So on each tab, you have a number of groups. Within each group you have commands. And the commands are sometimes things like a single button you push, so something like Insert Endnote. Looks like just a single button. Sometimes it’s a little bit more complicated than that, but basically that’s a command. Some of the buttons, like for instance Table of Contents over here on the left have a little drop down on them somewhere and if you click on or near the little drop down, what you find is that you get a number of options to choose from. It’s not just one command that does one thing. It gives you a range of options to choose from. And within that range of options that you choose from a menu and we’ll be looking at Table of Contents later in the course, you can have still further menus, commands, dialogs, and so on to follow in order to achieve what you want to achieve. So that’s the basic structure of the Ribbon. Now one important point to note as you look at the Ribbon here is that some of the commands, for instance Show Notes in the Footnotes Group, are grayed out. If I click on Show Notes it doesn’t do anything, it’s not enabled. In any given situation some commands will be enabled and some will not be enabled. So for instance I could insert a Table of Contents here in this document. I could add text. I could update Table, but I couldn’t Show Notes. So at any time, you can’t do absolutely everything everywhere on the Ribbon. Some of the commands will be enabled, some of them won’t be. And that brings me to another important point. I currently have just the words Hello World in this document. What I’m going to do is to put a picture into it. So I’m going to click on Insert,

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Learn Word 2013 click on Pictures. Let’s put a picture of a wombat in there. Now with that picture of the wombat selected, you can see the rectangle and the sizing handles around it. There is another tab now. This tab just appeared on the Ribbon. It’s called Format and it wasn’t there before. And that tab specifically is used for formatting pictures. If I have a picture selected, I will see the format tab so that I can format that picture. If I clicked away from the picture, say I clicked in the middle of the phrase Hello World, note that tabs disappeared again. Now I mentioned just now that you always see these tabs and there are others. Well there’s an example of another tab. It’s what’s called a Contextual tab. It’s only there in context. If you have a picture selected, you get that Picture Tools Format tab. I’ll come back to that later on in the course. The thing to tell you about the Ribbon is you’ve seen the tabs, you’ve seen the tabs that are always there and you see that some of the tabs appear from time to time. And you’ve seen that each tab is divided into groups and then within the groups you’ve got commands. In many of the groups in the bottom right hand corner, there’s a little square icon there and that is what’s called a dialog box Launcher. And if you’re familiar say with an older version of Word, you may have formatted a paragraph. So you may have seen justification settings, things for doing a list, doing background colors, borders, and so on. And you may be familiar with a Paragraph dialog. And you may be quite like using a Paragraph dialog. Well the dialogs haven’t all gone in Word 2013 and that’s what this little box in the bottom right hand corner here does. Because watch what happens if I click on that little box. That launches a Paragraph dialog and there you have a control which is probably quite like the ones you’re used to in the older version of Word that you may be familiar with. Now some people are perfectly happy using the commands on the Ribbon, some people like to use the dialogs, some people like one in one situation and one in another. The dialog are still there and that’s what you use the dialog box Launcher for in many of the groups. Now I mentioned earlier on in this section that the Ribbon does take up space on the screen. And particularly if you’re using touch and you have the touch version of the Ribbon where everything is spaced out more, you may be in a position where the Ribbon is using up more space on the screen than you’d like it to. Now there is a way of effectively hiding the Ribbon while still using it and, in fact, there’s a couple of ways of doing it. And let’s take a quick look at those now.

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Learn Word 2013 First of all, if you look at the Ribbon, towards the right hand end down here there’s a little sort of chevron, Collapse the Ribbon. Watch what happens if I click that. What happened is the Ribbon itself pretty much disappears. What you see is just the tabs. Now if you’ve been using Word 2013 for a while, you’ll probably know what’s on each tab and you don’t really need to hunt around to find what you need. Early on this may be quite a difficult way to work. But if you know a particular command is say on a particular tab; so let’s suppose you wanted to insert another picture after Hello World, you know that you insert a picture using the Insert tab. Click on Insert, the Ribbon reappears, the commands reappear. You could maybe insert your picture. Let’s say I now put in kangaroos and once you’ve done that, the Ribbon disappears again. You’ve still got the tabs but the Ribbon itself disappears again. So the Ribbon appears long enough for you to choose the command or to click on the dialog box Launcher that you need, but then when you’ve done what you want to do, it disappears again. Now if you’ve chosen that option for hiding the Ribbon, to bring it back at any time, click on View and then you’ll see an alternative little icon here in the bottom right here which says “Pin the Ribbon”. Click on Pin the Ribbon and the Ribbon is back on display again and now when you execute a command it will stay visible. Now the second way of doing pretty much the same thing but with an added twist is to use this little button to the right of the Help button. If you look at the top of the display up here, there is a Ribbon display options button. If you click on that, there are three options. The bottom option is Show tabs and commands which is what we have now; that’s the default. The middle option, Show tabs, is what we achieved just now where all you could see was the tabs. But the top option is Auto-hide Ribbon, hide the Ribbon, and then click at the top of the application to show it. I’m not going to do this now. It’s one for you to try out yourself. If you choose this option, what happens is the Ribbon and the tabs disappear and you have pretty much the whole of the screen space to work in. And then all you need to do is to put the cursor at the top of the screen, you’ll find a little triple dot at the top as well, hover over that, click, and you will see the Ribbon reappear. So that’s an alternative, slightly more flexible version, and a way of getting yourself a bit more screen space to work in.

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Learn Word 2013 And finally on the Ribbon, I’d like to show you just one other thing.

If you right click

somewhere in a space on the Ribbon, I’m choosing a space just over on the right here, right click on that. There is an option, Customize the Ribbon, and that takes you into the Word Options. One of the pages we didn’t look at before was Customize Ribbon. Now customizing the Ribbon is outside the scope of this course, although we are going to very quickly look at customizing the Quick Access Toolbar in the next section. But with this page in the Word Options, you can customize the Ribbon. You could create your own tab. You can create your own groups and you can move any of the Word commands into those groups. There’s a limit to what you can do to the existing tabs and groups, but you can certainly make your own and customize your own. The other point to make here is that if you look at the list on the right, this currently shows you the tabs that exist now. As we’ve seen already some of them are contextual, so you haven’t seen them yet. You’ll only see them when you take some sort of appropriate action like inserting a picture. But one of the tabs, the Developer tab, is not checked. There is a standard tab which is used when you come to write VBA, write Macros to use with Word. And if you wanted to use VBA and Macros with Word, you’d probably want to enable that tab just by checking it to enable it. But with the other tabs, Customize the Ribbon, main tabs, the list of tabs here, all tabs would include contextual tabs such as the one we saw before on the Picture Tools, the Format tab. So as I say, customizing the Ribbon is outside the scope of this course but it’s pretty straightforward. It may be something you want to look into yourself. So that’s it on the Ribbon. Let’s take a look in the next section at the Quick Access Toolbar.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Quick Access Toolbar Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at the Quick Access Toolbar. In the preceding section, we looked at the Ribbon and to the top left of the Ribbon, right in the top left hand corner of the word Window, you’ll see the Quick Access Toolbar or to be more precise you’ll see a version of the Quick Access Toolbar because exactly what you see there depends on your local customization. Now if you look to the right of this sort of sequence of buttons that are part of the Quick Access Toolbar, there is a drop down arrow, click on that, and you see a list of commands. Some of them are checked, some of them are not. In my installation here, Save is checked, Undo is checked, Redo is checked, and Touch/Mouse Mode is checked. And they are the four buttons that I can see on the toolbar: Save, Undo, Redo, and Touch/Mouse Mode. As you see there are several other buttons that I could check if I wanted to. So for instance, if I wanted to have an Open button, all I need to do is to check Open and you’ll see the screen tip there, Add to Quick Access Toolbar. I now have an additional button, an Open file, Open Word document button available. Now I can do the same for any of the standard options here and I use the opposite approach to remove something from the toolbar. So if I didn’t want the Redo button, all I do is uncheck it and it’s removed from the Quick Access Toolbar. So in a nutshell that’s what the Quick Access Toolbar is about. It’s very much personal preference which commands you enable on the Quick Access Toolbar. I would usually have Save enabled because I like to save my work a lot as I go. And for somebody like me who makes a lot of mistakes, Undo is a great option. We’ll come back to Undo in a little while if you’re not familiar with it. The ability to switch between touch and mouse mode may be if you either always use touch or always use mouse you don’t really need a quick way of switching between them. But by default that is delivered enabled as part of Word 2013. The other important part about the Quick Access Toolbar, if I just click on the Customize button at the end again, is that right down one from the bottom it says More Commands. And if you select More Commands, you get yet another page of the Word Options that we haven’t looked at so far and that’s the Quick Access Toolbar page. Now this provides a sort of cut down version of customizing the Ribbon. This is customizing the Quick Access Toolbar. And this lets you put additional commands on to the Quick Access Toolbar. At the moment, I’ve just got those four

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Learn Word 2013 on the right there: Save, Undo, Touch/Mouse Mode, and Open. I can pretty much take any command that’s available, and there are a lot of commands in Word 2013, and put that on the Quick Access Toolbar.

So I’ve got the popular commands list here.

What about All

Commands? Now that is a long list. If I went down All Commands and choose something; let’s suppose I choose the command Bold. If I select that and then click Add, I will have a Bold command added to the Quick Access Toolbar. Click on OK and I’ve now got that B which basically says if I choose some text, I’m going to choose the word World, and click on that B that text is made bold. And that’s exactly what’s happened there. Now you can add any command to the Quick Access Toolbar. Now, it’s a good idea to keep it fairly limited. You don’t want it to get too far across there. But very often people may be doing a particular job where they’re using a command a lot, find putting that command on the Quick Access Toolbar can really save quite a bit of time. Finally one other point about Quick Access Toolbar, right down at the bottom there, there is an option to show it below the Ribbon. Some people prefer to show it down there. In terms of the distribution of available space in the main window, some people prefer it that way. So, that’s basically it for the Quick Access Toolbar. And a useful exercise for you to do there is particularly when you’ve been using Word 2013 for a while is to just consider which commands it’s most convenient for you to have on the Quick Access Toolbar. So what I’m going to do finally is to click back on the More Commands there. I’m going to select Bold on the right, the one I just added, and click Remove. Click on OK. So I’ve removed that bold command. Go back in here. I’m going to switch off the Open because I don’t really use that that way and I’m going to leave on the switch between touch and mouse mode because I’ll be using both on this course. I’m finished working on the Quick Access Toolbar for now and it’s time to turn our attention to the mini toolbar and minibar. We’re going to do that in the next section. I’ll see you then.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Mini Toolbar/Bar Toby: Hello and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at the mini toolbar in Word 2013. I probably say the mini toolbar and the minibar because within the concept of touch this particular device in Word 2013 tends to being referred to as the minibar so far. But effectively although they are two slightly different things they achieve similar effects. So I’m going to talk about them both in this section. Now we haven’t looked at selecting text yet, but I’m going to select some text here just to demonstrate what I mean by the mini toolbar. And I’m selecting this text with the mouse. So I’m going to select the text of the word World and as I release the mouse button just watch what happens. I get a little toolbar just up on the right of where the cursor is pointing at the moment. That’s the mini toolbar and on that I have a selection of commands. One of them, the one that’s highlighted in blue on the left there is the Bold command. This text is currently Bold; that’s why it’s highlighted. I could if I wanted to move the cursor say on to the I, select that as well, and the text now would be Bold and Italic. And then, of course, all I have to do to switch off Bold is to just click on the Bold button and it’s now just Italic text. Now let’s look at doing the equivalent with touch. So let me just select World with my finger. Now having made that selection, I tap on that and I see the minibar. Now the options on the minibar are very similar to the ones that we saw in the mini toolbar using mouse and keyboard. They’re much more spaced out to make it easy to make a selection using fingers. I could, for instance, just make that selection Bold by tapping on Bold. And in addition I have a drop down on the right hand end of the minibar that gives me access to a contextual menu. On that menu I have Font, Paragraph, but I also have commands like Translate, Search with Bing, Hyperlink. We’ll look at those commands later on, but as you can see the minibar that you get in touch gives you access a specific set of commands that are contextual related to where you are. And of course, you still have access to everything on the available tabs on the Ribbon. If you’ve switched to touch mode on the Ribbon, of course, the commands on the Ribbon will be spaced out in much the same way that the ones on the minibar here are as well.

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Learn Word 2013 So that’s the mini toolbar and the minibar. I’ll see you in the next section.

Chapter 7 – Backup, AutoSave and AutoRecover Video: Setting up AutoSave and AutoRecover Preferences Toby: Hello and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, I’d like to talk to you about Backup, AutoSave, and AutoRecover. And I want to deal with Backup first. One of the features of Word 2013 and a feature of Word for a long time really is that it does make it easy to start creating documents, printing documents, saving them to default locations, and so on. But there is no inherent backup facility in Word. And what I mean by that is that it doesn’t make your document safe for you.

If you work in Word, create documents, edit

documents, print them, maybe letters, maybe business documents. If you’re computer fails, if your hard drive fails and you don’t have a copy of those documents anywhere else, then you will lose those documents. It is absolutely essential that you keep copies of the documents you create and maintain over a period of time somewhere safe; and somewhere safe means somewhere other than the computer that you’re actually creating and maintaining them on. Now one great option now is to save copies of documents in the Cloud to backup to the Cloud, to backup to SkyDrive. But you also have relatively cheap ways of keeping documents on external devices, such as just memory sticks if you don’t have a lot of data or if you do have a large amount of data you might want to get yourself some sort of external storage device. External storage devices nowadays can be 500 GB, a terabyte, 2 terabytes in size, capable of storing vast amounts of data relatively cheaply. But it’s really up to you to make sure that you make those external copies. That as a part of your working routine, only if you’re dealing with personal paperwork, perhaps personal letters and so on to make sure that you take regular copies of files, Word documents, and of course other types of document that you create and maintain and keep copies of those elsewhere. There is no built-in facility in Word 2010 to make your document safe for you in the long term. However, in the short term there are the AutoSave and AutoRecover features which are what I’d like to talk about next.

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Learn Word 2013 Now no matter how safe and secure you think that you’re working environment is things can go wrong. One of the most obvious things that can go wrong, particularly if you’re working on a PC rather than say a laptop with its own battery is that the power can fail. And if you’re halfway through doing something in Microsoft Word 2013, if the power fails and Word stops working, your file may well be left in an indeterminate state. Another thing that can go wrong is that Word itself can fail. Now my experience of more recent versions of Word is that they are very stable. But I have yet to use a version of Word that does not fail, does not get one of those not responding messages that it doesn’t it recover from. And when it’s failed, you have to stop it someway, maybe just switch the PC or laptop off. Now in order to give yourself the maximum chance of recovering of your work when failure happens and I don’t say if, I say when because it will, is to have AutoSave set. And what this entails is going into the Word Options and in the Save page right at the top in the Save documents section there is a Save AutoRecover information option. You should have that set On. I can’t really think of a situation where you wouldn’t have that set on. In the past some people have said, well if I do AutoSave it interferes with me working while it’s happening. Maybe in an extreme situation that may be the case, but for the vast majority of people you should have Save AutoRecover information every so many minutes. Now the default is 10 minutes. You can enter any number from 1 to 120. One minute may be overdoing it a little bit, but 10 always seems to me a pretty good option. And what will happen is if something does fail, if Word fails or the power fails, then you will be able to recover from the last saved version of your document that will be at most 10 minutes old. So the most you can lose is 10 minutes of work. Now what happens in that situation is that when you next start Word, Word realizes that it didn’t close properly last time you closed it and it says to you, well something went wrong last time and you didn’t close me down properly. I’ve got an AutoSaved version of the file you were working on. In fact, it may have several AutoSaved versions of the file you were working on. And it says Do you want to restore this last version? Do you want to go back to where you were? And it gives you the option of recovering a version you were working on. And that means you can minimize the amount of work that you’ve lost.

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Learn Word 2013 Now hand in hand with that feature is another that was introduced recently. And that’s this one, straight under Save AutoRecover information it says “Keep the last AutoSaved version if I close without saving.” Now when you’re working in Word, when you close a document it pretty much always says to you at the end, Do you want to save changes? And you will usually say Yes. Occasionally if you’ve been working on something, you’ve changed your mind about it, you might say No. But something else that might happen is you’ve been working on a document, you are asked if you want to save the changes, and you accidentally say No. And you click on No and then you go, Oh no! I haven’t saved those changes. All that work I’ve done I’ve just said No and I’ve not saved any of it. Well, what Word will do if you have this box here checked, it will keep the last AutoSaved version if you close without saving. So let’s suppose you’ve been working on something for an hour, you’ve been saving AutoSave versions every 10 minutes, you get to the very end and you indicate that you want to close the document, and Word says, “Do you want to save changes?” and you say No. You close it and you go, Oh no! I didn’t mean that. There is an option to recover the last AutoSaved version when you reopen Word again. So basically you can go back to the last AutoSaved version which is going to be at most 10 minutes away from when you closed the document and that gives you a good option of recovering the last AutoSaved version even though when you last closed the file you said you didn’t want to save the changes. So let’s suppose that you’ve made that mistake. I’m in Word now. Go into Backstage View, Open, Recent Documents, and down at the bottom here under the list of Recent Documents we have Recover Unsaved Documents. And if you click on Recover Unsaved Documents, what you see in the list here will correspond to the last unsaved document that you closed and you’ll be able to identify that one, recover it, and then carry on as normal. So we’re ready now to start putting some great content in some Word documents. And on the basis of this section, you should know how to make that content as safe as you can, both in the short term, in terms of making sure that if something goes wrong you don’t lose hours of work, and also that as you create, edit, and finalize your documents you’re putting them somewhere else safe as an offline backup of your documents. So I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

© Copyright 2008-2013 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Word 2013

Chapter 8 – Entering and Editing Data Video: Typing, Editing, and Deleting Text; Customizing Status Bar Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. We’re now going to spend some time looking at basic entry and editing of text in Word. So from now on we’re going to be making Word documents and putting all sorts of content into them. We will format the documents later in the course. For the moment we’re primarily concerned with entering and editing the content and to some extent moving the content around as well. So let’s begin with a brand new document and we’ll put some text into it. So there’s a really straightforward keyboard shortcut for creating a new document, that’s Control and N. It gives us a new blank document and note that with a new blank document, the cursor is flashing at the point where text will appear. If I just start typing with my keyboard now, this is where the text will appear. So if I start typing, that’s it. Now for most of this section, I’m going to be just using a conventional keyboard on a PC. If you don’t have a conventional keyboard, if you’re using an on-screen keyboard, then there are a couple of possibilities. If you have Windows 8, then there will be a button on the taskbar where you can bring up the on-screen keyboard. So for instance if I click it here, the onscreen keyboard looks like that and I can, of course, type conventionally on that on-screen keyboard. Also within Windows 8, there is an available on-screen keyboard as well. You can normally get to the option to switch that on using Windows plus U to go into the Ease of Access settings. So one way or another if you’re not using a physical keyboard, you’re obviously going to need to enable your on-screen or virtual keyboard and as I discussed earlier on it does a problem in terms of how much space you’ve got to type in, but you can, of course, hide the Ribbon as we saw earlier on. For the moment, I’m going to use a physical keyboard, so I’ll assume that if you need to use an on-screen keyboard by now you know how to set it up. Now wherever you are in terms of entering text in Word 2013, the text always appears at the cursor. So if I move the cursor, suppose I move the cursor before the word First, so I move it to the left of the F in First and start typing, that is where the text appears. If I reposition at the end,

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Learn Word 2013 press the Space, carry on typing, again that’s where the text appears. If I make a typing error, click back to where the error is, correct it, and so on. Now apart from moving the position of the cursor using the mouse and just clicking elsewhere, I can use the arrows on the keyboard. So the left arrow, if I press left arrow repeatedly, I move back through the text. If I press right arrow repeatedly, again, I move forward through the text. And don’t forget if you’re using touch, you can just touch somewhere within the text and that will put the cursor into that position. Now sometimes when I’m using touch, you’ll see the onscreen keyboard leap up at the bottom there. Just ignore that. I’ll get rid of it each time. Now the next thing I’d like to look at is what’s right down at the bottom of the screen and that’s the status bar. Now the status bar has two halves at the moment. We can see a load of buttons and a slider on the right. I’m going to look at those later on in the course. I don’t want to worry about those at the moment. I want to concentrate on what’s on the left. What you see on your status bar may be different from what I see on mine. What I can see on mine at the moment is an indicator to say that we’re currently on Page 1 of 1. So with this new document I’m still working on the first page. It then says 12 words and in fact if you count the words there, there are indeed 12 of them. Then there’s a little symbol, then it says English United Kingdom, then there’s another little symbol. What you see on your status bar, what you see on mine may be different, but we can reconcile the differences by right clicking on the status bar and looking at what all of the options for the status bar are. Right click on the status bar and we have a long list of options. Now with all of these, the value of whatever the option is, is shown in this long list. It’s basically a sort of menu. So for instance, the formatted page number is one, the section we’re in is one. I’ll talk about sections later. The page number is Page 1 of 1. The vertical page position is one inch. The line number is one, the column number is 23, word count 12 words; a whole load of values. But the only ones that are shown on the status bar are the ones that are ticked. You can show as many of these as you can squeeze into the status bar. So for instance, if I didn’t want to see the page number, if I uncheck that the first entry on the status bar, Page 1 of 1 no longer shows. But if I tick on section, then I see the section number appear instead. I can, of course, have both ticked and then I’ll see both. So that’s basically how we control what appears on the status bar.

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Learn Word 2013 But one of the particular entries I want to look at now is about three-quarters of the way down the list and it’s called Overtype. And we normally refer to it as the Overtype Mode and the Overtype Mode at the moment is set to the value on the right which is Insert. Now I’m going to show this on the status bar, so I’m going to tick that so that it’s on the status bar. Then I’ll click away to close the Customize Status Bar list and you now see the word Insert down here on the status bar. The cursor is currently to the left of the word Line in the sentence “This is my very first line of text.” And I’m going to type in the word Short followed by a space. I want you to watch what happens to the word line as I do that. You notice that as I type the word, Line moves to the right and that’s because the mode I’m in, the overtype mode I’m in, is Insert, which means that as I type what I am typing is inserted before the character to the right of the cursor. Now if I click on Insert on the status bar, it toggles the setting from Insert to the other available mode which is Overtype mode. Now note the cursor is still to the left of the word Line and I’m going to type the word Short with a space again, but I want you to watch what happens this time. As I type now, what I am typing overtypes what is there already. It basically obliterates whatever was there before. And this is a very important fundamental thing when you’re using word even if you don’t use Overtype Mode very often. If you manage to get it into Overtype Mode, that will be happening and you’ll probably wonder what the heck’s going on. Why is what I’m typing deleting what was there before? If you want to use both modes that’s fine; the most important thing is you need to know which mode you’re in. I will almost always on this course be in Insert Mode and I’m going to go back into Insert Mode now. So here’s a pretty good situation. I’ve just obliterated some text that I didn’t mean to. Well, that’s where Undo comes into it. There is an Undo command. The simplest way of accessing it usually is from the Quick Access Toolbar, so one of the buttons up there. Click on the button once, Undo typing, click once. Now watch as I click that button time after time, one by one the last bits of typing I did are undone and what was there before returns. So Undo, Undo, Undo, Undo, Undo. And I’m back to where I was before I started typing in Overtype Mode. And of course, if I went a little bit too far I could go back and get rid of the Short that I did before. But, supposing I got back to that point and I though, Ah I’ve undone both of those Shorts. I really still wanted the first one, then I can Redo the first one and the Undo has got a button pointing to

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Learn Word 2013 the left there. The Redo over here has an arrow pointing to the right. If I do Redo, I can put back the Short-space that was actually correct. So that’s Undo and Redo. Now I should point out that Undo and Redo are not restricted just to typing actions. They can pretty much Undo or Redo any action that you take in Word 2013. And in the case of Undo, if you look at the arrow there’s a drop down to the side of it and the drop down lists the last so many actions, how many is one of the things that you can set in Word Options. And if you go back to some old action, say the one where I started to type First there, if I click on the typing F in typing First, it will undo everything back to and including that step. So if I clicked there, I’d pretty much wipe out almost everything I’ve typed so far, which I don’t aim to do at the moment, but you can undo back a long way like that. Now let’s look at one or two other important aspects of entering and editing text. At the moment, the cursor is to the left of the L in Line. If I press the Delete key, the one that’s on the keyboard labeled either Delete or Del, it deletes a single character to the right of the cursor. So in this case, it will delete the L in Line. If I press the Backspace key, Backspace or BS, it’ll be labeled, it deletes the character to the left of the cursor. So in this case, it would delete the space to the left of the I. So they’re the two delete keys which do one character at a time. Now as we’ll see in the next section, we can delete more than that at a time if we want to. But if you’re just deleting single characters, Delete deletes a character to the right of the cursor and Backspace deletes a character to the left of a cursor. So now let’s look at another important option when you’re entering text. Depending on your keyboard, normally pressing the End key on the keyboard takes you to the end of the current line. And once you get to the end of the current line, if you press the Enter key, you start a new paragraph. So at this point that’s my second paragraph and I could go on to type a third paragraph, which is what I’m going to do now, but watch carefully. Now you may or may not see this, but I have made some deliberate spelling mistakes there and those spelling mistakes have caused some underlining. Now it’s possible that you won’t see that sort of underlining on your installation of Word 2013 because it depends on a couple of Word Option settings and I want to look at those now.

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Learn Word 2013 So let’s go back into Word Options, click on Proofing, and just over halfway down this page, when correcting spelling and grammar in Word and there are two options there: Check spelling as you type and mark grammar errors as you type. Now the whole question of spelling checking and grammar checking, I’m going to go over in detail in a later section. The reason for mentioning this now is that particularly if you’re new to Word, seeing all those underlinings may be a little bit baffling and they may be a bit annoying. If you’ve used Word for a while, you’re probably used to it. If you really don’t want Word to check things for you as you type, so you don’t want it to tell you about spelling mistakes or suspected spelling mistakes and/or suspected grammar mistakes, you can uncheck of both of these now and then that won’t happen. I’m going to leave them set on at the moment partly because if I do type in any spelling mistakes, I don’t want them to find their way into this course. So it’ll help me to spot them and make sure that you don’t finish up the victims of my spelling mistakes. But if you want to switch that checking off, you can do. I haven’t made any changes so I’ll Cancel. Is if it switched off then when I’d made those mistakes nothing would have happened. They wouldn’t have been underlined. I just would have been able to make those mistakes. So in this section we’ve covered the basics of entering text, a little bit about editing text, and dealing with things like deleting text, the difference between insert and overtype mode, and just making sure that you know how to switch on and off spelling and grammar, what’s called AutoCorrection as well. In the next section, we’re going to look not only at a few other aspects of entering and editing text, but the all important question of how to select text. So I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Navigation; Word Wrapping; Making a Selection Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look some more at entering and editing text. In the preceding section, we looked at some of the basics. This time we’re going to look at dealing with a little bit more text and some of the things that arise. Now in order to make things a little bit more straightforward for me and hopefully for you as well, I’m going to show you a little trick about how to get plenty of text to work on in Word 2013. If you type in a new empty document or in fact in any document this character sequence: the equal sign, then R-A-N-D, and then a pair of round brackets, and press the Enter key. What Word 2013 will do is to enter some random text into the document for you. So I’m going to press Enter now. Now I’m going to do that again. Now I’m going to do that once more and then that will be enough text for me to demonstrate what I want to demonstrate. So first of all, we’ve now got more than one page and you cannot see all of the text at once. If you’re using a mouse and keyboard, you can scroll through the available text using the scroll bar on the right, grab the bar with the mouse, and pull it up and down like that to find your way through the document. And of course, it works exactly the same as a standard Windows scroll bar. If you’re using a touch device, of course, all you need to do to scroll your way through the document is to just swipe in the normal way up and down with your finger to move through the document. Of course, you can also use the scroll bar as well if you want to. Now if you’re at one end of the document, let’s suppose I’ve got the cursor at the very end of the document, the bottom of the document. To get to the beginning, it’s basically Control and Home. Now keyboards do vary so it’s impossible to say exactly where the Home key is on your keyboard. But Control-Home will take you right to the very beginning of the document, that is it will put the cursor at the beginning of the document and Control-End will put the cursor right at the very end of the document, ready to type some more text. As I mentioned earlier, if you’ve got the cursor within a line, let’s say I put the cursor in the middle of that line, just pressing Home takes the cursor back to the start of the line and pressing End takes it to the end of the line. Now this is particularly for anybody following this course who’s not used to using a word processor at all.

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Learn Word 2013 One of the conventional issues when you’re typing a lot of text is what happens when you’re typing and you get to the end of a line. Well in the case of Word 2013, Word automatically handles that for you by what’s called wrapping the text. When it can’t fit the word you’re typing in at the end of the line it starts a new line for you. It’s very important that you don’t watch what’s happening, get to the end of the line and then press an Enter key to start a new line yourself. You only need to press an Enter key to start a new paragraph, in which case you get the equivalent of a gap like this one where you’ve gone from one paragraph to the next. So the wrapping of text is automatic. I’ll demonstrate that now just by typing a sentence. I’ve got the cursor positioned here to the right of the word Device with a full stop at the end of that paragraph and I’m just going to type a sentence to demonstrate the wrapping of text when it gets to the right hand of a line here. Now it’s time to look at one of the most important actions that you can take when you’re using Word and that is selecting of text. In fact, you can select more than just text in word, but let’s just think about selecting text for the moment. Let’s suppose that I wanted to take one of these paragraphs and move it within the document. Let’s say this one here that says, Reading is easier to, where I’ve added the extra sentence at the end. To select something in Word with a mouse it’s pretty straightforward really. In principle, let’s say I wanted to select the whole of this paragraph. One very simple way of doing it, although it might take you a little bit of practice if you’re not quite used to it, is to click with the mouse at the beginning of the paragraph, so put the cursor at the beginning. Now click there and drag the cursor to the very end of the paragraph. And when everything is selected, release the mouse button, that’s the left mouse button, and that is now selected. Now making a selection in Word 2013 is a very important action because various things can follow on from making a selection. One thing that might follow on from making a selection is that you might delete that selection of text. So for instance, having selected that text if I just press the Delete key watch what happens. That text is now deleted. I’ll do an Undo, the text is back again. You may also have noticed when I made that selection, let me just make the selection again, but after I’ve made it, mini toolbar appears. And I can use the commands on the mini toolbar to format the text, but we’re going to come back to that later on in the course.

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Learn Word 2013 One very significant thing that I can do with it, which is relevant to what we’re doing now which is entering and editing text, is that I could move that text somewhere else in the document. But I’ll come back to that a little while later as well. What I’d really like to look at now is some of the other options for selection. Now there are many options for selecting text in Word 2013. We’ve already seen how to use the mouse to drag over a selection, but let’s look at some of the others. If you wanted to select one word, let’s suppose you wanted to select the word Demonstrates here, you could, of course, just drag the mouse over the letters and select that way, but also a double click within the word selects just that single word. Now having made that selection, I can deselect by clicking anywhere else. Now do a triple click. That selects the whole paragraph. Deselect again, click somewhere else within the same paragraph, hold the Control key down and click, and that selects a single sentence. Now as I said, there are many of these. For instance, still looking at the same paragraph if you move the cursor towards the left, you see the normal cursor changes into a right pointing arrow. If you click, you will select the line of text, not the sentence, not the paragraph, but the line of text that’s in line with the tip of the arrow. If you double click, you select the whole paragraph. There are many more of these, but let’s just look at a couple of really important ones. Let’s suppose you want to select a long sequence of text, say three paragraphs from there to the end of that one. All you need to do is to click at the beginning of the passage, hold down the Shift key, click at the end, and you get the whole passage. And your selection does not have to be contiguous. So let’s suppose I want to select say two paragraphs with something between them that is not selected. Let’s say I select that first paragraph, hold down the Control key and select another paragraph, and I’ve got two noncontiguous paragraphs selected. And, of course, I can increase that to three or more and I don’t have to use whole paragraphs. That could be single words, sentences, lines, any combination of those things that I want. So just one more very important option and that is that the keyboard sequence Control-A selects all of the contents of a document in Word 2013.

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Learn Word 2013 Now to find out even more about selections and you’ll realize pretty soon how important being able to make selections is, then I refer you to the online Help and it’s pretty comprehensive in terms of these and other ways of making selections within Word. So let’s now have a look at some of the selection methods when using touch. Let’s suppose that I’m looking at that same paragraph where I added the sentence at the end, if I’m using touch, if I just touch within that paragraph, then the cursor is placed. I can see the cursor flashing there and the little circle is a little handle that I can use in order to extend a selection. So if I touch within the circle and pull off to the left, I extend the selection to the left. I’ve now got two circles. I’ve got one near the beginning of the selection and one near the end. And I can use the lower or right hand one, the one near the end now, to make a complete selection within the paragraph. Now using those little selection handles on a touch device, I can make fairly sophisticated selections. One of the issues with this, of course, as it always is with touch, is how big your fingers are, what the resolution of your screen is, how small or large the text is, and so on. So there’s always a big amount of experimentation with this. But if you do have trouble, don’t forget the option you have of using larger text but also as you’ll see later on in this course, you can actually zoom into what you’re doing. You can make everything a little bit bigger and a little bit easier to work with, with some of the methods that we’re going to look at later in the course. But that’s the basic way of making a selection using touch. So that is enough on selection for now. In the next section on entering and editing text, we’re going to look at a couple of special cases of entering content into a Word document. So please join me for that.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Inserting Symbols, Date and Time, and Document Property Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In the preceding two sections, we’ve been looking at ways of inserting and editing text in Word 2013. Much of what we’ve looked at would apply to graphics, for example, as well to images, photos, and the like. In this section, we’re going to look at some special cases quite briefly, but they’re primarily also relate to text. And we’re going to start by looking at inserting symbols. Now to make these examples a little bit easier to follow, I’m going to make the font size a little bit bigger. It’s currently 11 point. I’m going to move it up to 18 point. And what I want to do is to suppose that I’m going to write a copyright notice here. So Copyright 2013. And between those I want to put in a copyright symbol. So how do I do that? Well, if I go to the Insert tab right over on the right one of the options in the Symbols Group is Symbol. Click on the drop down and I’m offered a number of symbols. Now recently used symbols, most popularly symbols initially will appear in a list at the top, and one of those is the copyright symbol. So if I click on the copyright symbol, it appears there exactly where I want it. So that’s a very straightforward symbol to insert into a document in Word 2013. So let me look at another couple of options, the similar kind of thing. Supposing I wanted to put a trademark symbol in; I could follow exactly the same procedure but this time I’m going to click on More Symbols. And if I look at More Symbols, I can see two tabs. There’s a Symbols tab and there is a Special Characters tab. On the Symbols tab with a font of normal text, which is basically the same font or I should say an extension to the same font that you’re using in the body of the document which in this case the Calibri font. And then there are subsets. Now I’m not going to go into all these font subsets. Suffice to say that if you have a particular font selected, you want to find the TM symbol, you can scroll down a very, very large number of additional characters corresponding to different alphabets, Cyrillic, Scandinavian, all sorts of alphabets and different combinations of characters there. And normally you will find the one you want. If for any reason you cannot find the character that you want then you can try the Special Characters tab over here and not only does this give you several special characters but in some cases, there is also a shortcut key to achieve the same affect. So for instance, let’s suppose

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Learn Word 2013 here I’m going to put the trademark symbol in. There’s trademark, TM, click on Insert, Close, the trademark symbol is there. But with the registered symbol, there is actually a keyboard shortcut. So let me just go back into that again, Symbol, More Symbols, Special Characters, the registered mark it’s Alt-Control-R. So let me cancel that and here type, hold down the Alt key, hold down the Control key, press the R, and I get a registered symbol. Now I may well need to resize any of these symbols depending on the effect, whether they’re visible, whether they’re too small, too large. But that’s basically how you put these various symbols in, and the symbols you can insert include accented characters. So if you’re say writing a document in English but you need to put in a couple of French terms with accented characters, you can follow that kind of approach as well. And now there’s just one other little group of commands that we need to take a quick look at here. To the left of the Symbols Group is a Text Group, and within the Text Group, there are various ways of inserting text into a document that can save you a great amount of time. Now to take a specific example of that, the last option here, the bottom right one, if I hover over it, I see the screen tip of object, but if I click on the drop down one of the options is to insert text from a file. And if you have text from a file, you can quickly insert it just by choosing that option, browsing to find the file, and then all of the text in that file can be inserted into your Word document. It’s a very useful option. Above that is an option which you can use to insert the Date and Time at wherever the cursor in your document. So click there, the Date and Time dialog appears. You can choose a format for the Date and Time; so for instance, Monday, December 17, 2012. And then you can also check this box here. If you do check it, it will cause that Date and Time to be updated automatically.

So somebody looking at this document

subsequently would see an updated date. Now, of course, sometimes you may want it to update automatically, sometimes you may not. But the option is there. Now there are various other options in this Text Group for text that I can enter into the document. The last one I want to look at is the middle option, top one here, click on the drop down, and one of the options is Document Property. If I hover over that, it gives me a list of some of the properties of a document that I might want to insert at this point. We looked at Document Properties earlier in the course. So let’s choose one of those. What about author?

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Learn Word 2013 Supposing I want to put the author name somewhere in a document; click on author, there it is. And that in itself may not seem much of an achievement but supposing I went in now to this document, having inserted that and I changed the author name. So let me just go into File. So let’s suppose I want to change that. Toby wasn’t actually the name of the author. I want to change that property. I want to change it to say fully Arnott. Okay, that’s the correct name. Click on OK. Now let me go back into my document and, of course, that has been updated. Now the important thing there is that when we inserted that text from the Text Group we didn’t just insert the word Toby, we inserted a thing called a Field. The Field’s value was Toby when we inserted it. We went back into the Document Properties and changed the name to Toby Arnott and that updated the name in the document. So if you’ve got something in a document that may change over time you can use that approach. So that leads us neatly to the second exercise for you on this course. I would like you to make a very straightforward Word document with just two lines in it. It will be example-02 and the one that’s supplied with the course, example-02 will be my version of that. It should just be a document that looks like this. It should say Copyright, copyright symbol, your name, but not your name typed literally. I want it so that it’s using your name as the author of the document and such that if you go in and change the author of the document the words there will change as well. And I’d also like it to have a single line underneath that with the current date and inserted in such a way that if you opened it on a different day, it would have that date on it. So that will be your example-02. It’s my example-02 if you’d like to check my version. And of course, you need to make sure yourself that both lines work correctly. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 9 – Copy, Cut and Paste Video: Various Methods of Copying, Cutting and Pasting Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at Cut, Copy, and Paste. And these are the techniques that we use in order to either move content within a document or between documents or to make additional copies of content. You can actually Cut, Copy, and Paste all sorts of things in a Word document, including graphics, shapes, photos, and so on. We’re primarily going to be concerned at the moment with text. But what you learn about text pretty much applies to everything else as well. In order for it to be straightforward to see what I’m doing here, I have formatted one paragraph in this document differently from the others. I’ve colored it red, given it a different font, given it a different font size. And that’s the paragraph that we’re going to Cut or Copy. Now you should be familiar with the concept of Cut and Copy, if you’ve used Windows software before. So I’m not going to go into that in any detail, but I am going to show you two or three of the ways of doing this in Word. Initially, we’re going to use keyboard and mouse. So first of all, let’s select that paragraph, quite straightforward. Move the cursor off to the right, double click, that selects the whole paragraph. We don’t need the mini toolbar on this occasion. And on the Home tab the left most group, there’s a group there Clipboard with a set of buttons. And these buttons if you use the Ribbon buttons for this, they’re ones you’ll use a lot. The top one, the pair of scissors of course is Cut; the next one, the two sheets of paper is Copy; then we have one that we’re going to look at a little bit later on, that’s Format Painter; and then we have the Paste button. Now, of course, as you’ll know, the Paste button won’t be available until we have something on the Clipboard to Paste. Now the first thing I want to do here is to Copy that paragraph to the Clipboard. So I’m going to click the Copy button. Of course, nothing visible happens, other than the fact that the Paste button becomes enabled. So now let me move the cursor down to a point a couple of paragraphs further down. I’m going to click in front of the word Video in that paragraph there. I don’t have anything selected now, I just have the cursor flashing in front of the word Video and then I just

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Learn Word 2013 click on the Paste button. And that makes a copy of that paragraph in that position. Now, of course, if I’ve copied something to the Clipboard when I’ve pasted it again it’s still there. So I could make another copy. Let me scroll down the document, put the cursor in there, and click on Paste again, and there’s an additional copy of the same piece of text. Now I’ve just undone the two pastes that we did and this time instead of doing a copy and then pastes, I’m going to do a Cut and Paste. So again I’m going to select that same red paragraph. I’m going to do it just with the mouse here, so I’m just going to drag over it. When I drag I make sure that I drag to the beginning of the following paragraph without actually selecting anything in the following paragraph. Now instead of clicking on Copy, I’m going to click on Cut. And when I click on Cut, the paragraph actually disappears from its original position. Now if I move down to a different location and click on Paste effectively, I have moved the paragraph to a new location. So Cut and Paste removes the original and effectively moves it to somewhere else. Let me now put the cursor a couple of paragraphs below that and click on Paste again and, of course, that will still work but now I get an additional copy of the text. Now if you’ve used Windows software before, you’ll be familiar with the keyboard shortcut equivalent for these three operations. I’ve got that same paragraph selected here. If I hover over the buttons in the Clipboard Group, it actually shows you the keyboard shortcuts as well. So Cut is Control and X, Copy is Control and C, Paste is Control and V. And of course, they work in exactly the same way. If you like to use keyboard shortcuts, then they work absolutely fine in Word 2013. Now I’m going to deselect that paragraph and I’m going to show you the same operation using touch. For the purposes of this, I’m going to switch back on the touch mode, give myself a little bit more space around the buttons. I’m going to use the buttons on the minibar at the moment. So I’m going to tap within that paragraph and I’m going to drag the handles from, make sure I’ve got the whole of the paragraph selected. And now if I tap I bring up the minibar and one of the options on the minibar is Cut. So I’ve obviously got Copy as well. Click on Cut. Now all I’ve got to do is position the cursor where I want the cursor to be. So let me tap down at the beginning of another paragraph down here and if I want to just now do a Paste from there, I can

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Learn Word 2013 either bring up the minibar or I can use the Paste button on the Ribbon. So let me use the Paste button on the Ribbon, tap on Paste, and it’s pasted in. Now as with many other touch operations in Word 2013, it takes a little bit of getting used to. But I think, particularly, if you use the touch settings on the Ribbon, you soon get the hang of it and it works absolutely fine. So now I’m back in keyboard and mouse mode and what I’m going to do is show you a couple of other very specific things related to Cut, Copy, and Paste. I’m again going to Copy that red paragraph. So I’ve copied it, Control-C to copy it to the Clipboard. Now instead of putting the cursor in front of one of the paragraphs above it, the one beginning with the word Video, I’m going to select that paragraph. But bear in mind the paragraph on the Clipboard is the red one, although I’ve selected that one. If I now Paste and this time I’m going to use the keyboard shortcut of Control-V, what happens is that the paragraph on the Clipboard replaces the one I’ve selected. Whenever you do a Paste, you replace whatever is selected. If you’ve got nothing selected then what you’ve got on the Clipboard is inserted at the point where the cursor is. But if you’ve got something selected as I have here, then that is obliterated, it’s deleted by the Paste. So here goes the Paste, Control-V, and that paragraph has now gone. The next thing I’m going to show you is also I think a pretty useful thing to be able to do. Let’s suppose I’m still working with this red paragraph here. What I’m going to do is to select the paragraph and this time instead of copying it or cutting it, all I do is click with the mouse button, the left mouse button once and hold inside the paragraph and now move the mouse up two or three paragraphs, say to the beginning of the paragraph with the word Video at the beginning again. Release the mouse button and what I’ve effectively done is a Cut and Paste but this was a move by dragging. So I’ve moved that paragraph by dragging it elsewhere in the document. So that paragraph is still selected. This time before I click within it with the mouse, I’m going to hold the Control key down, click within it, now drag again up three paragraphs. I’m going to go before the paragraph that begins with the word To, release the mouse, and this time because I held the Control key down, I’ve actually made a copy of that paragraph. So that’s an equivalent of Copy and Paste just by using dragging with the mouse and in that case holding the Control key down.

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Learn Word 2013 Now so far we’re talking about Cut, Copy, and Paste. We’ve really been cutting, copying, and pasting whole paragraphs. Of course, you don’t have to do whole paragraphs, you could do individual characters, words, sentences, and as we’ll see later pictures, graphics, and so on. But there’s another aspect of Cut, Copy, and Paste which we do need to look at briefly now and that is the fact that when you Paste something, there are often additional factors that you need to take into account. Now I’ve got two copies of the paragraph Beginning Themes and Styles and I’ve made them very different. This one is in a different font, it’s green, smaller point size. If I click inside that paragraph, you can see it’s the Black Oak standard font and it’s 8 point. If I click inside the red one, its Algerian 12 point and the regular one is Calibri 11 point. Now what I’m going to do is I’m going to Paste part of what’s in the green paragraph into the red paragraph; just watch what happens. So let’s take, start at the word Theme. I’m going to just take a few of the words. I’m going to Copy them, so that’s Control-C. And then I’m going to put the cursor inside the red paragraph somewhere, say to the right of the word Graphics there, and then Paste with a Control-V. Now note how the formatting is kept. Note that the green has been kept, the fonts been kept, every aspect of the formatting there has been kept. Now let me Undo that and I’m now going to do the same thing but in a different way. Now note that the content of the Clipboard hasn’t changed. I still have that green text on the Clipboard, but instead of using Control-V to Paste that text into the red paragraph, I’m going to go the Home tab, Clipboard Group, Paste, and I’m going to use one of the options on the bottom arrow there. So I’ll click on the drop down and I get three Paste options. The first one, Keep source formatting. Now notice that you get a live preview of what keep source formatting would do. See how there you can see the green words, theme, the pictures, charts, and SmartArt in the red paragraph. That’s basically the default. That is what the Paste did just now. But if I go to the second option which is described as Merge Formatting, then I still get the same words pasted but the formatting is merged with what’s there already, which basically means in this case that the formatting that’s in what I’ll call the destination paragraph, the red paragraph, overrides what’s in the text already. So the fact, for instance, that we’re using the Algerian font in the red paragraph will override the font in the text we’re about to paste. So when we do the paste, we actually get a paste with the same format as the destination paragraph, the red paragraph. So you

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Learn Word 2013 have two options, you’ve got the option of I want to Copy and Paste some text and keep the source formatting or I want to Copy and Paste some text but I want it to be basically the target, the destination format. Now it’s called Merge Formatting because sometimes there will be a defined formatting element in the target or the source which is not in the other. And in that case, the formats will be merged; so where there is a definition that will be used. Now we’ll be looking at formats in quite a bit more detail later on in the course but for the moment, I just need to make it clear to you that sometimes when you’re copying and pasting and the formats are different, then you will need to be careful which Paste option you choose. What I’d like to do quickly now is to show you a couple of other things in relation to Cut, Copy, and Paste that are worth knowing. I’m not going to go into them in detail. They’re both things that you could certainly investigate a little more yourself, but knowing they’re there I think is the most important thing of all. If you look at the Home tab, Clipboard Group on the left, there’s a little dialog box Launcher in the bottom right corner. Its screen tip is Clipboard and if you click on that, it shows you what’s on the Clipboard. The Clipboard is currently empty. If you’re used to doing Copy and Paste in Windows, you’ll be aware that you can Copy and Paste items in much the same way as we’ve already done in this section. Let me again select that paragraph and then Control-C, copy it to the Clipboard. I actually see it appear on that Clipboard. This is the Office Clipboard here. Now let me take another paragraph, say the one two down from there, the one that begins Save time in Word, let me copy that. And what you find is that you can have multiple items on the Office Clipboard. Let’s take the red one next, Copy, Control-C. I’ve now got three. And if I wanted to paste something, say, before the word Reading in that paragraph, I could choose any one of these three to paste. The most recent is at the top; that would be the red one. The oldest is down there, the bottom; that will be the green one. So let’s say Paste and I get the green one pasted in. So you can have multiple items on the Office Clipboard at any one time. You can in fact paste them all if you wanted. There’s a Paste All button. And of course, you can clear the Office Clipboard by clicking on Clear All. And finally something that we’re going to be using later on anyway, but I’ve got this document that I’m working on here with all these mixed formats. Supposing that while I’m working on this I decide to create a new document and work on a new document at the same time. Very

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Learn Word 2013 straightforward way of creating a new blank document, as you should know by now, Control-N. And with my new document if I go to the Clipboard drop down again, I still see that my three copied paragraphs are there. If I did Paste All, of course, they all get pasted into the new document. And that’s a pretty neat way of copying a number of pieces of content from one document to another. Although, of course, I could quite easily copy them one at a time, reorder them in whatever order I wanted, and so on. So that’s it on Cut, Copy, and Paste for now. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 10 – Navigation and Find Video: Uses of Navigation Pane Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. As your documents become longer it becomes more and more difficult to find your way round a document, maybe to find a particular point, particular phrase, or maybe even a particular image within a document. One of the tools that can help you with this in Word 2013 is the Navigation Pane and we’re going to look at the Navigation Pane in this section. Now by default the Navigation Pane is not visible but it’s easy enough to make it visible. On the View tab in the Show Group, the bottom option there is Navigation Pane; so click on Navigation Pane and the Navigation Pane appears normally on the left of the Word 2013 window. Now one thing that may be useful to you possibly later on is to know that the Navigation Pane although it normally appears in that position can be moved around and you may well find that it’s a pane you use quite a bit for particular things, as I’ll point out in a couple of minutes time. But if you want to move it around, if you hover over the pane itself, you normally get that four-arrow cursor, that sort of heavy cursor. If you click with the mouse and hold that you can normally drag the pane around. This will sometimes be useful if having it in its normal position obscures something or if indeed you’d rather have it hover over the content of the document to give you a little bit more space to work with. So you could for instance drop it just where I’ve left it there and then it may be a better position to work with. If you want to dock the Navigation Pane back where it was all you’ve got do again is grab it, pull it over to the left, and then it will snap back into place. Now there are really three main uses for the Navigation Pane and the first of them won’t really help us much at the moment because we need to introduce an outline and some headings to our documents, which we’re not going to deal with for a little while yet. So one of the options there is Headings and this is create an interactive outline of your document. When we get on to longer and technical documents later on and when we’ve looked at formatting, we’ll be looking at outlines of documents. At the moment, we’re going to skip that and come back to it later.

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Learn Word 2013 The second option, however, the Pages option is a very useful one. If you click on Pages, what you see is a representation of each page of your document. And although these little thumbnails are very small, they can actually give you a very good idea of how a finished document is going to look. The one with the heavier outline is the page that’s currently selected. So if I click on the second one, it gives me a thumbnail of the second page and takes me to the beginning of the second page in the main document window there. And the third option that I’m particularly interested in is this one, Results. Click on Results. This is a way of finding something in your document and you can use the Search box above to look for text. Or if you’re looking for something else, such as a particular picture for instance, if you click on the little magnifying glass there, it gives you a number of options of things that you can look for: Graphics, Tables, Equations, Footnotes and Endnotes, Comments. Now we’re going to be looking at many of those later on in the course. For the moment, I just want to do a straightforward find of some text. So let’s suppose I want to find the word Video in my document. I know that word is in the document at various places. So if I click the word Video, just stop typing because as you type, Word 2013 is already looking for what you’re typing, and it gives you several occurrences of the word Video. In fact, it’s found 12 results. Now as you can see the Window on the right each of those is highlighted. So in this case, it’s emphasized in yellow. And the occurrence of each is listed in this list on the left. So you can see where the word Video appears in a number of sentences in the document. If you say selected the first one, click there, the first occurrence is now emphasized in a slightly darker color. And then these little, this pair of buttons here lets you step through all of the occurrences. So if you’re looking say for a phrase which has the word Video in it but there may be several phrases with the word Video in it and you’re looking for a particular one, you can use these little arrows here to step through them. So let’s start with that one, let’s look at the next occurrence, and notice how as I step through the currently selected occurrence of the word Video is highlighted in that different color. So I can work my way through the document in either direction. I can obviously go back, go through them in that way, and in each case apart from seeing the occurrence highlighted in the document I’ll see it in the list here as well. So I can perhaps get a good clue which one I’m interested in. If I think, Oh! it might be that one, if I click in that one it takes me straight to that

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Learn Word 2013 one. So there are various ways of looking at the occurrences of in this case the piece of text and choosing which is the one that I am particularly interested in. Now having used the Navigation Pane to find something I could, if I wanted to, type a different term in to find that. But otherwise when I’ve finished if I click on the cross here at the right hand end of the Search box, I go back to the initial state. So as you can see it’s pretty straightforward to do a find in Word 2013 using the Navigation Pane. You can make up a more sophisticated version of a find. Suppose for example I really wanted to look for the word Video with a capital V and not just either with or without a capital V. If you click on the drop down at the right of the Search box, the very first entry on there is Options, and you can set Find options. Now there are quite a few of these. The first of them is Match case, and with Match case what it does is to match the case. So if I type in as my Search term Video with a capital V, it will only find the occurrences that have a capital V. The second option there is Find whole words only. So if I check that option and typed in Video with a capital V, it would not find a word like Videography because it wouldn’t match the whole word. So let’s say in this situation that I want to match case and I want to find whole words only. Click on OK. Now I’m going to type in the term Video with a capital V and in this case it only finds six results, the six results where there is a capital V involved. But other than that the find works in exactly the same way. Now if you click on the drop down at the right hand end of the Search box again, you find other options here, Advanced Find and Replace, but we’re going to look at them in the next section so I’ll see you then.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Find and Replace; Go to Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In the previous section, we looked at the use of the Navigation Pane and one of the uses of the Navigation Pane is to find text or other objects within a document. Now there is another way of finding text within a document although it largely overlaps with the method you saw in the preceding section. And it uses a dialog that’s been a feature of Word for a few versions now, and it’s the Find and Replace dialog and that’s what we’re going to look at in this section. Now the exercise that I’m going to perform on this file is to replace the word Choose in it everywhere that it occurs with the word Select. Now I don’t know how many times the word Choose occurs in this document. At the moment within this document, the cursor, what’s called the insertion point is before the word Reading there in the sixth paragraph, so it’s just there. On the Home tab, the right hand editing group at the top there is Find and we’re going to go for the second option which is Advanced Find. Now if I select Advanced Find, I get the Find and Replace dialog. Now it’s a pretty straightforward dialog to use. You type what you’re looking for; in this case Choose and you click on Find Next. Now, watch what happens. The insertion point is just before the word Reading, paragraph six, click on Find Next, and it finds an occurrence of Choose in paragraph seven actually. Now the reason I’m mentioning these paragraphs and paragraph numbers is to point out an important difference between this and using the Navigation Pane and that is that when you’re using this Find and Replace approach the Find starts at the insertion point; so it starts where the cursor is now and it carries on from that point to the end of the document. When it gets to the end of the document, it goes back to the beginning and cycles right round to where you started from again. So, back into Find and Replace. I put the insertion point back where it was at Reading, click on Find Next, it finds a Choose, Find Next. Quite a bit further down the document, you can just see that one above the dialog. Again there’s no Navigation Pane here to list all these occurrences. As you click Find Next again and again, it just hops from one to the next. And then it’s getting towards the end of the document now, click again, click again, and then before too long it gets its way back up to the beginning again. And there we are, that’s right near the beginning of the

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Learn Word 2013 document. So that is a pretty straightforward way of stepping through the occurrences of the word Choose in this document. In addition to being able to do a straightforward Find like that, there is a button at the left hand corner one here, More, and if you click on More, it gives access to a number of other options which are basically very similar to the options that you get in the Navigation Pane. So you have options like Match case, Find whole words only, etc. Now in addition, there are additional options down here. I’m not going to look into these now but I’ll briefly describe them. Format and Special, you can look for the text that you’re looking for in this case the word Choose, with a particular font or in a particular font or with some kind of special characters in or around it. So it is a very, very flexible and powerful way of finding. Now the use of Format and Special and many of these options is outside the scope of this course, but that’s another great area to experiment in. And if you’re looking for something in a large document sometimes being able to narrow it down with some of these additional options can be really helpful. Okay, so let’s get back to what we were intending to do which is to replace all occurrences of the word Choose with the word Select. Now I’m going to remove these options by clicking on Less, remember that button said More before. And I’m going to click on the Replace tab. Now when I click on the Replace tab, it leaves my Find what there Choose but let’s me specify what I want to replace it with. And I want to replace it with Select. Now at the moment, I have an occurrence of Choose actually highlighted. So having typed in the string of characters, the text that I want to replace it with, Select, I can click now on this button which says Replace. When I’m doing Find and Replace in Word using this dialog, I always do a little test first as a sort of sanity check. So click on Replace and let me just move that dialog down again, where that said Choose before you notice the word Select has gone in its place. And automatically Find and Replace finds the next occurrence and I could replace the next if I wanted to, if I wanted to do another check. So let’s replace again, yep, that looks fine. You see it says Select there now. Once I’m happy that it’s working correctly, I can click on Replace All. Click on Replace All and Word says to me All done. We made 8 replacements. Click on OK and the jobs finished.

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Learn Word 2013 Now one thing worth pointing out, if you’re doing an exercise like that and you don’t really want to replace all, let’s suppose that I decided I was going to put these back. I was going to change Select back to Choose everywhere and I started by saying Find Next and on that one I clicked Replace, then I came to the next one I thought I don’t actually want to replace that one, I want to leave that one like it is. You can skip one by instead of clicking on Replace just click Find Next and then it doesn’t replace that occurrence. So you can go through and manually choose which ones you want to replace and which ones you want to skip over, that is to leave as they are in effect. So that’s basically how Find and Replace works. I want to look at one other option here quite quickly. The Find and Replace dialog or its earlier equivalence has been around a lot longer than the Navigation Pane and one of the options that existed then and still exists now is Go to, which is actually within the Find and Replace dialog as well. If I click on the Go to tab, it actually gives a way of going to specific points in a document. Now to a large extent, people now tend to use the Navigation Pane for much of this functionality, but this is still here. So if you want to go to a particular page, a particular section, a particular line, a bookmark, a comment, various other types of object within a document that’s one way of doing it. Some of these won’t mean much to you at the moment. Hopefully most of them will by the end of the course. But you may well find a use for Go to later on. So that’s it for now on this section. I’ll see you in the next one.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 11 – Keyboard Shortcuts Video: Keyboard Shortcuts and Key Tips Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at keyboard shortcuts. Now I must confess that I’m not a great user of keyboard shortcuts myself. I tend to use keyboard shortcuts that are common across the pieces of software that I use on a day to day basis, things like Control-C to Copy, Control-X to Cut, Control-V to Paste. But there are so many commands and I use quite a few different pieces of software that I find it very difficult to remember them all and to not get them confused between the pieces of software that I use. But I know many people who are great fans of using keyboard shortcuts and if you’re good with keyboard shortcuts, they can provide a very fast way of working. So in this section, we’re going to look at some of the key things you need to know in Word 2013 and primarily about where to get the information you need about keyboard shortcuts. Now I’ve mentioned quite a few keyboard shortcuts already and the first one that I mentioned already that we’re going to use now is F1 to bring up online Help; so just press F1. Now once online Help is available type in Keyboard Shortcuts and hit the magnifier and we get a list of links to help with keyboard shortcuts. Now the very first item on the list when I did the search now was this one, Keyboard shortcuts for Microsoft Word, Article Word 2013 Keyboard Shortcuts for U.S. keyboard layout. That looks like exactly the thing that we need. Now in terms of using the keyboard shortcuts this particular item in Word, Help is really the mainstay of the information that you’re going to need. There’s a short discussion about finding and using keyboard shortcuts and then it takes you into Office basics, navigating the Ribbon that we’re going to talk about in just a moment, and then there is a quick reference for Word which takes you through all of the keyboard shortcuts by task. So if I choose a task from these, so something like Insert Special Characters which we looked at earlier on in the course. It gives a number of keyboard shortcuts for a number of special characters you might want to insert. So for instance, to insert the copyright symbol, it’s Alt-Control-C; the trademark symbol, AltControl-T, and so on.

When you’ve looked in a particular category like Insert Special

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Learn Word 2013 Characters, press the minus to collapse it and maybe go to another category, Select text and graphics, press the plus to expand it, select text by holding down Shift and using the arrow keys to move the cursor. So that’s the instruction for keyboard shortcut there. Note, Shift and arrow keys are all you need to use. But basically for each of the tasks it gives you the keyboard shortcuts that you’re likely to need. So that’s a great source of information for pretty much every keyboard shortcut you’re likely to need within Word 2013. I’m now going to close the Help and go back to Word itself with a document open and talk about what are called key tips. Now before the Ribbon came along, Microsoft Office in general and Word in particular had a menu system and you would select a menu, a number of options would present themselves, and against each of those, there would often be a keyboard shortcut. You could type in the keyboard shortcut and you’d be able to execute whatever the command was. Now many commands that you can see in Word still have equivalent keyboard shortcuts but some don’t. So for instance, if you look at the Home tab here, if you look at the Paragraph Group in the bottom right hand corner of the Paragraph Group, there’s a dialog box Launcher. If I hover over it, the screen tip says Paragraph Settings. No keyboard shortcut. If I hover over the dialog box Launcher at the bottom right hand corner of the Font Group, I get Font Control-D. So if I press Control-D on the keyboard now I will bring up the Font dialog. That’s really what keyboard shortcuts are all about. But it’s a bit of a mixture as you’ve just seen and there is a system within Word 2013 and Office 2013 in general using the Ribbon of what are called key tips that can really help you to find your way round the Ribbon. Now the first thing you need to know is that if you’re looking at a Word document in general, you want to use the Ribbon, press the Alt key. You don’t need to hold it down, just press it once, and notice what happens. You get a number of little symbols that appear on the top of various things. There’s one each for the items on the Quick Access Toolbar numbered one, two, three, four, and then there’s one each for the tabs on the Ribbon; so there’s F for file, H for Home, N for Insert, G for Design, P for Page Layout, and so on. And all you need to do is to type either one of those numbers for the Quick Access Toolbar, one of those letters for the Ribbon and it

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Learn Word 2013 will take you to the next step. So let’s suppose I want to go to the View tab, I just hit the W on the keyboard. Now when I’ve hit the W on the keyboard, it then gives me the equivalent for each command on the View tab of the Ribbon. It gives me a keyboard shortcut. Well, it’s actually a key tip really. So F if I want to go into Read Mode, P for Print Layout, L for Web Layout, and so on. And there should be one of those for everything I may want to do. Notice that some of them are grayed out. You can’t necessarily do everything. It’s the same obviously whether you’re using key tips or not. There are always tends to be some commands you can’t execute at that time. But that’s a great way of using the keyboard to find your way around Word 2013. Now one very important point that I should mention here is that this isn’t only a matter of personal preference. I appreciate that some of you are restricted in some way and that you need to use the keyboard because you may not be able to use a mouse or you may not be able to use a mouse well enough to work accurately within a Word document. So I don’t consider keyboard shortcuts always to be an option, sometimes it’s a necessity, and I think the system of key tips in the use of the Ribbon in Word 2013 is a really good system. So you can follow that approach to pretty much execute any command you might need to use when you’re using Word 2013. And there’s one more step beyond this that I need to point out as well. So by now if you’re aiming to use keyboard shortcuts or if you use them or have to use them, you should be able to find your way around Word 2013 with quite a bit of confidence, although you may need to look a few things up when you first use them. Now one of the areas that’s a little bit tricky and something that people get stuck on is how they access the status bar if they’re using keyboard shortcuts. And there’s a little tricky way of doing that. There is one of the function keys, the F6 key which basically takes you through the panels and panes that are on the Word 2013 workspace. Now you’re going to have to watch this slightly carefully but if I press the F6 key once, it will select the Ribbon or the Information Bar on the right that we haven’t talked about yet, but eventually and this may require me to press it two or three times, it will select one of the items in the status bar. So let me press it once, now let me press it again, and now you may just be able to see that it’s selected section one in the status bar at the bottom. You see that that’s slightly highlighted. If I then use the arrow keys on the keyboard, so I’ve used F6 to get to here,

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Learn Word 2013 now I use the arrow keys, I can step through the options and if I choose one, suppose I choose that Language option there, hit Enter, I can then use the keyboard to choose the Language. In this case, English United States, press Enter to select that, and I have changed English United States. Again, if I wanted to change from Insert to Overtype Mode, press F6 to select the status bar again, right arrow to Insert, press the Enter key, and it’s changed to Overtype. So that’s the way that you can access the status bar and change options on the status bar as well. So that’s it on keyboard shortcuts and key tips for now. There are one or two other things that will crop up a little bit later on in the course, little extra things to mention. But that should be enough for you to be going on with. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 12 – Views Video: Print Layout, Web Layout and Draft Views; Ruler and Gridlines; Split and Switch Windows Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at Views in Word 2013 and basically by that we mean different ways of looking at the document or documents that you’re working on. Now so far in this course, we’ve primarily been using Print Layout View and in this view the document or documents we’re working on look most like they will if they are printed. There are some alternative views and each of those alternatives has its own use. Now a couple of them we can access using the buttons in the bottom right hand corner of the screen and the right hand end of the status bar.

If you look down there, you’ll see that one of the buttons is actually

highlighted at the moment, that’s the Print Layout View, that’s the one we’re using at the moment. But there are two other buttons down there. One of them is for a new view in Word 2013 which is called Read Mode and the one to its right is Web Layout View. Now in Web Layout View, what you see is most how a page will look if it was displayed as a webpage, so if you saw it in a web browser. Now to the right of these three buttons, there is a zoom control. I’ve mentioned this before. I’m not really going to look at the zoom control just at the moment. I’m going to come back to the zoom control in the next section. And in the section after that, I’m going to come back and look at Read Mode, the new view. So at the moment we’re in Print Layout View. Let’s quickly take a look at this document in Web Layout View. The difference is that we don’t get the pagination as though we’re printing on a sheet of paper. The text, obviously the content of the text is the same, but in a browser the way this is now, if you actually published this page as a webpage that is how it would look in a web browser. Now as I mentioned before there are a couple of other views as well. If you go to the View tab on the Ribbon, you can see two other views. So if you look at the Views Group on the left of the

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Learn Word 2013 Ribbon, you’ve got Read Mode, Print Layout, and Web Layout, the three we’ve talked about so far. But there are two other views. One of them is Outline View. Again, I mentioned that earlier on. That is a view that you would primarily use with say a longer document, although in fact it can be used on any document. But in order for Outline View to have any benefit, you need to have a structure to the document, so you need Headings and so on. And that’s something we’re going to come back to later in the course. But basically in Outline View, you can look at the structure of a document and you can show and hide sections and so on. And then the other view options we’ve got here is Draft View. Now with Draft View, the idea is that a lot of the content such as graphics is not shown and you just get a sort of rough draft of something. This can be quite useful for proofing something. So supposing you’re working on a document and it’s got lots of text, tables, graphics, all sorts of complicated things in it, but really all you want to do is to be able to read the text and maybe markup areas in the text. Well, Draft View can save you a bit of ink in your printer, save you a bit of reading and navigating your way around by just giving you what is in effect a rough draft of a document. So now I’m going back into Print Layout View and I’m going to look at some of the other options on the View tab. In the group to the right of the Views Group where we have Show, in that group we have the option to show the Navigation Pane, which we looked at earlier in the course. And we also have an option to show Ruler and show Gridlines. Now if I select Ruler, then I see a horizontal ruler at the top of the document Window and a vertical ruler on the left of the document Window. These are currently graduated in inches here, but you can graduate them in different units and you can change the graduation units in Word Options. One of the things that you can use the ruler for is to set and unset tabs on the page. But you can also use the ruler for things like aligning items on a page. As you can see it’s very straightforward to switch the rulers on and it’s of course very straightforward to switch them off again. Now when it comes to aligning items on a page, another very useful feature is the Gridlines option here. If I click on Gridlines, you get a set of gridlines on the page. These gridlines will not appear if you print the document, by the way. So they’re not going to appear on the printed page. But they’re really useful for aligning objects. When you come to put any kind of graphics

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Learn Word 2013 on to the page they can really help. The setting and unsetting of the spacing of the gridlines is not done via Word Options. It’s a little bit hidden away this. If you go to the Page Layout tab and go over to the right hand group, Arrange, there’s then an option up there, Align, and right down at the bottom of Align, there’s Grid Setting. So if you want to change the Grid Settings, that’s where you go for that; so straightforward to show the gridlines and straightforward to switch them off again. Now we’re going to come back to Zoom in the next section, so I’m going to skip that for now. I’m going to talk very briefly though about the Window Group. Some parts of the Window Group are only really relevant when you have two documents open at once. But there are one or two features here that you will find useful, although I won’t be going into them in detail on this course. One of them is the Split option. If you click on Split Window, what happens is the window gets split into two parts and each part is effectively a separate window on the current document. So if I use the scroll bar on the right of the top, I can scroll through the current document but independently I can scroll through it in lower window as well. This can be very useful. Let’s suppose you were putting in a very long table of data. You could display the header part so that you could remember what appears in each part of the table up here and then you could actually enter the data in the lower part. Or if you had a reference in the top, perhaps referring to a diagram with three or four sections, part A, part B, part C, and it was difficult to remember which was which and you were writing text about it, you could put the text in the bottom part while you’re looking at the diagram itself in the top part. That can be very useful. Most of the rest of it really relates to a situation where you have two documents open and you’re switching between the two. And again that can be very useful if you’re comparing documents or if you’re using one document to help with another. So by way of a very quick demonstration of that, let me remove the split here, let me go to Backstage View, Open, and I’m going to open say example-02. So I’ve now got two documents open. If I now go to Switch Windows here, a little arrow at the bottom; that actually displays the names of the two documents that I’m working on. It gives them numbers. One is the one that I’ve just opened, two is the one that was open before, and then I can just switch between them using that command on the View tab.

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Learn Word 2013 So in this section we’ve seen the available views in Word 2013. We didn’t really look at Read Mode but I’m going to concentrate on that after the next section. And in the next section, we’re going to look at Zoom. So please join me for that.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Zoom Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at Zoom. And in fact in terms of controlling zoom, there are a number of options in Word 2013 and we’re going to start with a very simple one at the bottom right hand corner of the Word 2013 workspace which is the Zoom Bar. So all I need to do is to put the mouse over the little slider in the middle, click with the mouse, hold it down, and then basically move from left to right. Going left zooms out so I see more of the document and the text, etc. looks smaller. And if I go to the right I zoom in, the text gets bigger, and I see less of the document at any one time. So really that is zoom. Now while I’m doing that if you look to the right of the slider, there is an indication of the current percent zoom. So let me just slide to the left again, goes down below 100%, 60%, 50%, 40%, so on; then I pull out the right it goes 200, 300, 400%, and so on. Now I can also click on that number and currently it says 100% and if I click on that it opens the Zoom dialog box. And the Zoom dialog box gives me control over zoom in a number of ways, including the ability to select from one of a range of preset zoom levels. So we’ve got 200%, 100%, 75%. But I can also type in the zoom level that I want. So if I want a particular percentage, say I wanted 82%, I can type 82%, click Enter, and that is now zoomed at 82% or I can use the little rollers at the right there and go through until I achieve the zoom level that I want. Now there are other options within this Zoom dialog and some of them correspond to commands which are in the Zoom Group on the View tab. Let’s have a look at one or two of them, but I’m going to use the Zoom Group. So I’ll cancel the dialog and for instance the setting of one page here shows one complete page in view. But if I click on multiple pages in this case, I get two pages in view. I can also zoom so that the view includes one page width. So I get the full width of the page even though I don’t get the full height in this case. Now a couple of other important commands in the Zoom Group; the 100% command takes you to 100% zoom. And if you click on the zoom button in the left most button in the Zoom Group, it brings up that Zoom dialog.

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Learn Word 2013 Going back to the question of zoom itself, if you look at the bottom right hand corner again, we used the slider. If you use the minus sign and the plus sign at the end they zoom out and zoom in, in 10% increments. So if you want to go to one of those sort of 10% multiple steps, that’s a great way to do that. And if you have a wheel mouse, if you hold the Control key down then using the wheel on the mouse does zooming as well, and some people find that useful. If you zoom out far enough, you actually get multiple pages. So let me go back to 100%. And the very last thing I’d like to go through with you about zoom is the use of touch because to zoom when you’re using touch, apart from of course using these buttons by tapping on the various buttons in the Zoom Group and so on, you can actually use pinch and stretch. So I’m going to pinch the current contents of the screen and that affect is to pinch that down as small as I’d like and then, of course, I’ve got the option put two fingers together on the screen, move them apart to stretch. Normally people do that with two fingers or with thumb and finger, stretch apart, and again you can stretch out to whatever level of zoom you want, and to zoom back in if you’re using touch, you can just tap on the 100% button. So that really covers the main things you need to know about zoom. I’ve left out one thing which we’re going to return to later in the course and that is one of the new features of Word 2013 and it’s called Object Zoom. But in the next section, we’re going to take a look at Read Mode which is also a new feature of Word 2013. I’ll see you then.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Read Mode Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at one of the new features of Word 2013 and that is Read Mode. Now if you’ve used an earlier version of Word, you may be familiar with a view such as Full Screen reading mode and really Read Mode is a development from there. The basic idea of Read Mode is that if you really want to read the document rather than work on it, rather than edit it, then Read Mode hides the writing tools and menus and it gives as much room as possible for the pages themselves. The other aspect of Read Mode which is important with the various devices that we’re now running Word 2013 is that Word 2013 fits the page layout to the device. So it will adjust columns, it will adjust font sizes, and so on, but also it lets you adjust the settings to make the reading of a document in Word 2013 on your device as comfortable as possible. I should point out that when I say it removes the tools for editing, it does actually leave certain things in place, as we’ll see in a moment. So to enter Read Mode, you can either click on the button on the status bar that’s the left hand one of the group of View buttons or use the one in the Views Group on the View tab on the Ribbon. Click and it takes you into Read Mode. Now in Read Mode, there is no Ribbon and you just have at the top these three words: there’s File to take you into Backstage View, Tools that lets you do a restricted number of things, there’s a Find function, a Search with Bing function, and an Inking function and I’ll talk about those in a moment, and then the View let’s you view the Navigation Pane. Clearly if you were in Read Mode with a long document, it would be useful to be able to find your way round and the Navigation Pane is a great way of doing that. And you also have an option to show Comments. Now we haven’t looked at Comments so far, but basically if people put comments on the document, you may want to be able to see those as you’re reading through a document. This may for example be a document that you’re reading but which you’re ultimately are going to need to make comments on yourself or in fact you may need to respond to comments about it.

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Learn Word 2013 Within Read Mode, there are a couple of additional things you can do to make things more comfortable for you in terms of reading a document. You can remove the toolbar all together by using this button in the top right. So to the left of the Close, Maximize, and Minimize this button says Auto-hide reading toolbar, but I’m going to leave the toolbar in place at the moment because I want to go over to the View Menu here and look at the bottom option which is Layout. There are two choices of layout. There’s Paper Layout and as you can see that’s the selected one at the moment, which means that I can basically scroll up and down through the document. But there’s an alternative layout called Column Layout, and in Column Layout it’s much more like the modern style of book or document reader where you have a button to turn pages. So for instance here I can read that page when I finish with it. I can click on the button to take me to the next page and there’s a button there to take me back as well. So that’s an alternative mode of working your way through the pages of a document. And if you’re in this mode you can also use a number of other settings on the View Menu such as changing the page color. This can be particularly useful if you’re reading in bad light or you have some kind of issue with your vision which makes it easier, for instance, for you to read white on black or indeed for you to use a sepia background. Also within this the column width can be varied. At the moment, we have the default which is really using the width of the screen for the text on the page. You can choose the narrow or the wide option. So with the narrow option you basically here can get the content of one page fitted on to the screen by making it a two column page. So there are some good options there for you to experiment with in Read Mode. Now I’m just going to change back to Paper Layout Mode and I’m going to click on the Tools tab and I’m just going to cover a quick look at Inking. Now Inking is a special type of commenting. It’s more marking up a document in the way that say an editor might mark a document. I’m going to use the Highlighter Tool and let’s suppose that I want to markup some of the content of this page for somebody else to have a look at maybe I’m effectively commenting on their grammar or perhaps questioning whether a particular sentence or paragraph is needed. But basically you can markup using a tool like the highlighter tool in much the way

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Learn Word 2013 that you would with a paper copy of a document that you were marking up as an editor or subeditor. If you press the Escape key when you finish with that, then effectively that disables this case the highlighting tool. Once you start making any changes at all and bear in mind that you’re not really changing the text of the document here, you’re really marking it up, you’re inking it. You still do have things like Undo which will undo the last inking that you did. And then let’s look at just one or two other things you can do in Read Mode. Let’s suppose I click on the Tools Menu again. There is a Find option which will bring up the Navigation Pane and let me find a particular string within the words in the document or find a heading or go to a particular page. And there is also an option, let’s suppose I’m reading this and I think, I wonder what SmartArt is about. There’s the term SmartArt. I can click on Tools, click on Search with Bing, and it will do a Bing search on the selected term, in this case SmartArt. So there we are. When you finished in Read Mode, if you go to the View Menu here click on Edit document and it will take you back into the Print Layout View for you to continue working on your document. So that’s pretty much it on Read Mode, but now you have your next exercise to do and your exercise is actually pretty straightforward. It doesn’t involve Read Mode at all. But I just need you to create a document in Word, a single document with only words. It must be at least 500 words long. The one we’ve been using here for practice is just over 1,000 words, so it needs to be at least half as long as this; so around about a page of A4. Make it longer if you can and I don’t mind where you get it from. You can get input from somebody else. You can Copy and Paste text. You can insert text. You can type something, maybe on a subject that you’re particularly interested in. The one thing is it must have at least two proper names in it; names of people, names of places, and it must have a couple of spelling mistakes in it. And that is going to be your example-03 and my example-03 is amongst the example files that you got with the course and we’re going to use your example-03 and my example-03 in the next section. So I’ll see you then.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 13 – Spell Checker Video: Spelling and Grammar Errors; Language Settings Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. From the title of this section, you’re probably expecting it to cover the spell checker, which indeed it does. But when you do spell checking in Word 2013, you optionally do grammar checking and in fact style checking as well. Now I’m really going to concentrate here on spell checking, but I’ll cover some of the basics of the other two as well. Now following on from the previous section, you should have written and saved your own example-03 which we’re going to use in this section. If you haven’t done that or if perhaps you’re not happy with the result, then you can use the example-03 that is provided as part of this course. Unfortunately an article about soccer in the U.K., football as it’s called in the U.K. and I’ve specifically setup in this document a number errors or at least a number of things that might well be errors. Now from now on when I refer to spell checking, I’m really referring to spell checking and grammar checking and style checking. When you’re doing spell checking in Word 2013, you really have three approaches to it. One approach is to let Word 2013 show you what it believes are the errors in your document by marking them. Now the main markings you’re going to see are the two that you can see on this page and that is a sort of red squiggly underline and a blue squiggly underline. And depending on the options you’ve got set in your copy of Word, if you’re looking at my example-03, you should see some red underlines and some blue underlines. Now don’t worry if they appear to be different to mine because there’ll be a good reason for that and that should become apparent over the next couple of minutes. But that’s only one option. Another option is that you can ask Word to correct your mistakes as you go along. And in many cases it will do it automatically. In some cases, it will need some intervention from you. But basically you can get to a situation where as you are preparing, presenting, editing a document any issues that arise are fixed there and then so you actually never finish up with any of these underlined terms for any length of time.

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Learn Word 2013 The third option is to just prepare the document, type the document, edit the document, whatever you need to do to it and then to run a pass, what’s called a spell check on the document to sort out any errors or suspected errors that remain. And in this section, we’re going to pretty much look at all three of these approaches. Now before we start doing that, I’d just like to point out something about one or two of the errors in this document. I’ve placed the errors in this document quite carefully and they reflect some of the most common mistakes that are made in documents.

For instance if you look at the

beginning of the second paragraph it says, “The memory of there Christmas dinners”. Now in English the possessive There; that is the belonging to them Their is T-H-E-I-R, not T-H-E-R-E. So that’s effectively a grammar error. It’s not a spell checking error because the word T-H-E-RE is a perfectly valid spelling in English. But it’s the wrong there, it’s the wrong word. So that’s a grammar error. That’s why it’s underlined in blue. At the top, this one, Eastlands, there isn’t a word in the English language Eastlands, but it’s a proper name and almost always proper names that are not well-known proper names will appear as potential spelling errors. Now when you see a proper name like this one, you have an option of saying to Word that word’s fine, just ignore it; it’s absolutely fine. Or you can even add it to what’s called your dictionary, your custom dictionary. And this enables you to supplement the standard dictionary for the language that you’re working in with words that you’re going to use in your documents. Now these words will quite often be proper names like Eastlands. Other names, like for instance, a Roberto on the second line there, that’s a perfectly straightforward Italian name and that wouldn’t be flagged as an error. Similarly, the place, Manchester, that’s not flagged as an error because your dictionary or my dictionary has Manchester as a place. Now one or two other points to make here, one of them is that you’ve seen that Eastlands there is underlined. Sometimes if you’ve used a proper name or made a mistake, a term will be flagged wherever it appears in the document. So sometimes, let’s take this one here, Eastlands, it appears again down here and the name that appeared further up, Robinho, which is a Brazilian family name, Robinho’s with a possessive apostrophe S there appears as well. You also get proper names that are good proper names but may not be the right proper name for the situation in which you’re using it and so on. So the issues that arise both with spelling and with grammar

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Learn Word 2013 and to some extent with style are not necessarily very straightforward and do need to be looked at pretty carefully. Now although we have these three approaches to spell checking a document, they all depend on some fundamental option setting and you need to make sure that you’ve got this right for spell checking for you to work. The first thing you need to do is to look at the Review tab and on the Review tab, you have a number of groups. We’ll be looking at some of them related to tracking and changes later in the course. In fact, we looked earlier on briefly at Inking which is on the right here. But here we’re interested in what’s on the left. And specifically at the moment in the second group, the Language Group, there is a button here, Language, and if you click on the little drop down there, you have two options: Set proofing language and Language Preferences. Now let’s start by having a quick look at Language Preferences. Now this is one of the Word Options that we looked at earlier on. It’s the Language tab in the Word Options. I explained it briefly then. I’ll just quickly mention it again now. I work in two different languages.

I consider them to be different languages; English United States and

English United Kingdom. I do some work in French and Spanish as well, but I haven’t been using them on this machine so they’re not setup as languages for me in Word 2013. You can add whichever languages you need to the one or ones that you have already setup. But it is very important that you have editing languages setup that you are going to edit in. Now you also have choices down here just above the middle of this page, Choose Display and Help languages. Which languages would you like Display and Help in? Now the display will be things like what appears on the display as prompts for various things to complete on pages and so on. Now generally speaking you’ll stick with match Microsoft Window. So you’ll match the language that’s being used for Windows, but you may choose to have these in a different language and you can add and select a different language from those you’ve got loaded if you want to. So first of all, make sure you’ve got that set correctly. My primary editing language is English United States but I also have English United Kingdom setup. So I haven’t changed anything. I can cancel from there.

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Learn Word 2013 Now on to the top option, Set proofing language. Now this also is extremely important because you need to set the language that you are going to proof, that you are going to spell check in at this case. Now my top two languages there, my two selected loaded languages appear at the top. Your language, your languages will appear as well and you can select either to use. If for instance here, you want to set one of these as your default and at the moment my default highlighted there is United States, you’ve got a little button there to say Set as default. Do you want to change the default language to English United States? This change will affect all new documents based on the normal template. That means whenever you create a new document based on your normal template, I’ll talk about normal template a bit later on, it will default to English United States for proofing as the editing language. I’m going to say Yes. Now there are two other options here which I’m not specifically going to go into. One of them is do not check spelling or grammar with which you can suppress spelling and grammar checking. This is useful if you have perhaps a long technical document and you only want to read it, you don’t need to proof it or edit it in any way. And you can also use automatic language detection which can be useful if you receive documents in multiple languages and you need to be able to switch to the right language for proofing very easily. So it’s very important that you make sure that you have your language set correctly here. And in this case mine is set, as you can see, at English United States. So we have the proofing language set. Now we need to go through and look at the Word Options that relate to spell checking and we’re going to do that in the next section. So please join me for that.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: AutoCorrect; Proofing Settings; Language Settings Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In the preceding section, I talked about some of the options for spell checking and we looked at the kind of errors that will occur and the sort of factors to take into account when deciding how to deal with spelling, grammar, and style errors. We also made sure that you have the correct language setup for proofing your document. In this section, we’re going to look at the relevant Word Options that we haven’t looked at so far and then correct the errors in this sample document. So let’s get started. Now the first thing I want to look at is what we call auto correction. So of the three options I mentioned in the previous section, this is the one where you get Word to correct things as you go along. So first of all, let’s go into Word Options, choose the Proofing page, and then near the top there AutoCorrect Options. Now with AutoCorrect Options, we can do quite a few different things and I want to demonstrate just a couple of them here. There are a number of options on the AutoCorrect tab for standard types of corrections as we go. Things like “Correct two initial capitals”. If you have a tendency to type two initial capital letters which is apparently a very frequent typing error that people make, then you can check the checkbox here and have Word correct that for you. If you want it to automatically capitalize the first letter of sentences, checkbox there. Capitalize names of days. These are all options here. In addition, you can setup text replacements. Now this is a great way of setting up to enter special symbols. For instance, if in your work you use the copyright symbol a lot, we saw earlier on how to put a copyright symbol into a document but you can define a key sequence which will do that for you. Now the ones that are setup by default here on Word include bracket-C-bracket, we’ll get a copyright symbol; bracket-T-M-bracket will get you a trademark symbol. And you can actually define your own. So if you’ve got a particular sequence of characters, you can effectively setup your own shortcut for getting that sequence in. Now there are various other AutoCorrect options you can setup here:

Math AutoCorrect,

AutoFormat as you type. So for instance, if you have this option set, the first one, straight quotes with smart quotes, when you put in just regular double quotes, double quotes at the beginning or end of a quote, they actually become smart quotes with 66 at the start and 99 at the end. You can

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Learn Word 2013 have it automatically format fractions and so on. Plenty more there for you to look into and experiment with. So you have all these AutoCorrect options. Most of them here are enabled. One other and that is right at the bottom down here, Automatically use suggestions from the spelling checker. I’m going to click on OK and now I’m going to demonstrate those options to you in that document. Now I’m just going to show you what happens with a few bits of typing with these AutoCorrect settings on. If I do open bracket-C-close bracket, that becomes a copyright symbol; if I do double quote-Hello-close double quote, the quotes become 66-99’s without me typing any particular characters to achieve that. And now I’m going to make a couple of spelling mistakes. Let me misspell the word Protected. Note how it corrects that after I’ve typed it, but some types of spelling mistakes, supposing I try the word Copyright spelled wrongly. That it hasn’t got a correction for but it does underline it in red to indicate that it’s probably a spelling mistake. So that’s a couple of examples of auto correction. Now back in the Word Options on the Proofing page, let’s look at the other important options here. There’s a section when correcting spelling in Microsoft Office programs and here we define some general rules about what to check and what not to check. So for instance, Ignore words in upper case, Ignore words that contain numbers. Words that contain numbers quite often it’s a good idea to ignore them because it might include things like part numbers, A-B-C-12-3 where there definitely wouldn’t be a need to spell check. You can also say Ignore internet and file addresses. Very often they have strange words that Word will just think are spelling mistakes. You can also get Word to flag repeated words. So there are a number of settings here. And there are also settings specifically for French and Spanish. Now in this section when correcting spelling and grammar in Word, this is where you define whether you want Word to do things like check spelling as you type. If you uncheck this, it won’t check the spelling as you type and that’s the setting you would use if you just wanted to check spelling at the end and you didn’t want all those annoying squiggles. Mark grammar errors you type, the same sort of idea. You don’t want it mark the grammar errors, you’re happy to check those at the end. And then you can also disable the correction of frequently confused

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Learn Word 2013 words. In fact with words like There and Their and Its and Its with an apostrophe, Word will try to correct some of those and in my experience sometimes it does it the wrong way around. So it’s one to be careful with. You can also suppress here the checking of grammar with spelling and if you’re checking grammar, a little couple down from there, writing style. Do you want it to check grammar only or do you want it check grammar and style? I generally don’t check style myself, but it’s a good option for you to try out. And right at the bottom of the options here, you can define exceptions for a specific document and in this case the document that’s open. You can say hide the spelling errors in this document only; hide the grammar errors in this document only. So you can treat the currently open document here as having exceptional settings. So they’re the settings I’ve got at the moment. What I’m going to do now is to look at a couple of the flagged errors and just show you options for correcting those and then I’m going to run a spell check itself. So let’s start at the beginning, let’s start with Eastlands and let us right click on the Eastlands and you can see that, first of all, there are three suggestions as to what that should be. Now none of them are correct because the name of the stadium is Eastlands, that’s the correct name. And I also know that this name occurs at least once in the rest of the document. So it’s not just one occurrence. And I basically have two choices here. I can say Ignore All which means wherever this occurs just ignore it. I’d use this if it was a word that I was using in this document but probably wouldn’t use again and I don’t particularly want to clutter my dictionary up with it. Or I could add it my dictionary and say, well, this is a word I use quite a bit and I don’t want Word 2013 to flag this in future. I just want it to accept it as a perfectly legal word and not a spelling mistake. In this case, I don’t often use that term so I’m going to say Ignore All. And not only is Eastlands no longer flagged as a spelling mistake but anywhere else in the document that it’s occurred it’s also no longer flagged as a spelling mistake there as well. So let’s move on to the next apparent error. There is underlined in blue. That means it’s grammar rather than spelling and as you can see T-H-E-R-E is a perfectly valid English word, but, of course, it’s not the correct There for that syntax. The memory of there Christmas dinners.

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Learn Word 2013 It should be the possessive Their. So if I right click on the word, what Word 2013 does is to suggest what the word should be T-H-E-I-R, which is of course correct. Sometimes Word gets it wrong and in that situation I may say to Word ignore that, just accept what I’ve done and then that blue squiggle underline would go away. On this occasion, Word 2013 is absolutely correct, I did use the incorrect version of the word There. So let me just change that now by clicking on T-H-E-I-R and that’s that one corrected as well. Now I could manually go through step by step dealing with each of these problems as they arise. That would be a perfectly reasonable way of proofing this document. However that’s not what I’m going to do. I am going to actually run a spell check. And to do that I use the big button in the left of the Proofing Group, so click on that and I get the Spelling Pane over on the right. Now the way the Spelling Pane works, it’s actually quite similar to the manual method that we just used with a couple of important differences. One of them is that as I correct each error, it automatically goes on to the next one. So it helps me to find my way through all of the flagged issues in the document.

It will also offer me a longer list of

alternatives and a couple of other advantages as well. So the next one it has is Stoke’s. Now Stoke is a city in the U.K. and Stoke-apostrophe S is a perfectly valid word to use. It’s not one I will often use though, so for this one I’m going to use Ignore. In fact, I’m going to use Ignore All because I may well have used that term elsewhere. So let’s go for Ignore All. It now picks the next problem. Now this sentence says, “He was also confident that despite his almost 68 years he would seen out.” Ah, I see that’s actually a grammar error as it says there. It should say, He would see out; so “see” I’m going to change. So having chosen the word I say change. Note that it does propose another perfectly valid correction. It’s possible that I meant he would seek out. You see how Word has said maybe that should be “seek out”. That would be a perfectly valid sentence as well. But I need “see” so click on Change. “Few would have bett against” and B-E-T-T, ah that’s not how you spell “bet”. It’s only got one there. I’ll just say for that one, well maybe I’ve made that mistake a couple of times. I’ll do Change All. Amusingly, the replaced Robinho; now Robinho is a Portuguese name. It’s again one I’m not planning to use very often so I’ll click on Ignore All. The next problem is “chequered”. Now “chequered” is a perfectly valid English word but Word 2013 isn’t aware of it so I’m going to add that to my

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Learn Word 2013 dictionary. So click on Add. Next problem Mourinho, that’s another proper name. And so I carry on correcting, ignoring, changing, and eventually when everything is resolved, I get a message from Word 2013 that says Spelling and grammar check complete. You’re good to go. And I have completely proofed or proofread my document and all of the issues have been resolved. So you should complete the spell checking and correction of example-03. If you’ve provided your own example-03, then make sure you correct that. If you’re using the example-03 provided with the course complete that and my corrected version of that is example-04. There was a little trick in there that you may or may not have spotted and that is the name of Roman Abramovich, the very well-known Russian oil multi-billionaire. I think the 50th richest man in the world if I’m not mistaken, is actually Abramovich not Ibramovich and that reflects one very important point that there are certain types of mistake that you can make which no software can correct because basically you just put the wrong word in and it was a valid and legal in this case proper name. It was just the wrong one. So that’s spell checking in Word 2013. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 14 – Formatting Video: Fonts, Font Size, and Font Colors; Text Effect and Text Highlight Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. I’ve put some text into a new empty document and in this section we’re going to start to look at formatting the text. So far we’ve taken it with default font, font size, coloring, everything else, but now we’re going to start to format it according to taste and requirements really. And the first thing we’re going to look at is what’s called Character Formatting. Now eventually we’re going to be formatting whole documents, long documents, technical documents, but we start at the other end of the scale. We start with the single character, the single word, and so on. And with Character Formatting, there are a couple of important things to realize right at the outset. First of all, if I say put the cursor, the insertion point somewhere in this paragraph, let’s say put it within this paragraph just to the left of the word Way, W-A-Y there. Many of the character formatting commands, many of the character formatting options that I’ve got are on the Home tab in the Font Group. Then in theory, I can change say the size of the font just by changing the font size using this drop down here. So if I say 24 point, which is much bigger than 11 point, look what happens or more specifically look what doesn’t happen. The formatting only applies from the point where the insertion point is or to any selected text. So if I wanted to start typing now note that I haven’t moved the cursor and I’m now going to type the word New; watch what happens. The word New takes on that new size. I change the size at a point in the text. Now I could have selected some text first. Let me now select this word down here, Compliment, and now let me change that to 24 point and that does actually change because I’d selected the text first. And that’s a very important fundamental point about character formatting. It applies at the point where you apply it or to any text that is already selected. Now the good news is that you know how to make a selection. We’ve seen several ways of doing it. So for example if I selected from the beginning of the word Provides over a few words, including one of the big words there; it doesn’t really matter where that selection starts and ends.

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Learn Word 2013 I could change all of that text to a different size. Now one of the other fundamental points when you’re dealing with character formatting is that when you make a selection like this, Word 2013 will tell you on the Ribbon what the current settings are. So for instance having selected all that, if I look at the Ribbon, I can see that the font is Calibri Body but the control where the font size normally is blank. And the reason it’s blank is because within the selection, there are a variety of font sizes. So we know the text that was there at the beginning is 11 point, the word New is 24 point. When there’s a mix, it keeps it blank. So if I now click on that drop down and say go for 18, then 18 point will apply to all of it. The important point here is that as I try different sizes, I get Word 2013s familiar live preview of whatever I’ve chosen. So if I were to say go up to 48 point or even 72 point, I can see exactly how that will look. So if I decide in the end on say 16 point and then click and select all of the selected text has changed to that font size, that 16 point font size. Now most of the basic options for character formatting are on the Home tab in the Font Group. So you can certainly choose the font there. You can choose the font size. You have a pair of buttons to the right, this one increases font size. This one decreases font size. So for instance, you can go a step at a time smaller for the selected text, a step at a time bigger for the selected text. And then you have another control here which is changing case. Options there include sentence case which is the normal one, convert it all to lower case. Note what happens to the capital on the word When, W-H-E-N, all converted to lower case. Or you can have all upper case, etc. On the right, here you have “Clear all formatting” and what clear all formatting does is to basically remove all the formatting from the selection. So if I did that, everything will be back the way it was at the beginning. I’m going to undo that clear to go back to where I was. Now on the second line here, you have commands to do Bold, Italic, Underline and with underline a number of options in terms of the shape of the line, the underline color, and so on. I’ll leave you as usual to experiment with those. And you also have options here for Strike through, using Subscripts, using Superscripts. And then in this bottom right hand corner, we have some options for coloring and for artistic effects.

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Learn Word 2013 Now let’s start with this one which is Text Effects and Typography. If I click on that one, I get a gallery of text effects. If I hover over those, I can see within my selection what effects I get. Now some of them are related to color, some of them involve reflections like that one, some involve outline and fill. And then the options here further down, you have outline options, shadow options, reflection options, and so on. So there’s actually a huge number of options there in terms of formatting text. Now some of those we’re going to come back to later in the course when we deal with themes and styles and headings and so on. But for that moment, I’m going to leave you to experiment with those. Now the next option in the Font Group here is Text Highlight Color and I can effectively with this do highlighting in a similar way to the inking that I did earlier on. So if I select a bit of text, I can click on the drop down there and choose one of the highlighting colors, such as that yellow color there. But what I want to do now is to talk specifically about the last point which is font color. Font color works in the same way as the others but it does involve using the Color Picker which we have not looked at in detail yet. And since we’ll be relying on the color picker a couple of times later on in the course, I’d like to just spend a little bit of time on it now. So first of all, I’m going to select the whole document. Now do you remember how to select the whole document? That’s Control-A and then I’m going to click on Clear formatting, put everything back the way it was. Notice that that bit of highlighting doesn’t disappear because it doesn’t count as formatting of the document. But I can easily remove it, say no color and that’s gone. And now what I want to do is to change the font color for the whole of one paragraph. So let’s choose the second to last paragraph. And then let’s click on Font Color. Now by default this is automatic with the settings we have at the moment. But we can choose colors in a couple of different ways and some of the meaning of this will not be apparent just yet, but I’m just going to quickly go through it now anyway. When we’re using Word 2013, then generally speaking a document has a theme. We’ll talk about themes later on. And within a theme there are a number of colors that are compatible with the theme. These are the theme colors and if you choose a theme color for something, note we’ve got the live preview so as I hover over here, I can see the effect of the color on the selected paragraph. If you choose a theme color, then that color will be compatible

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Learn Word 2013 with everything else that is colored according to the theme. If you go for something that isn’t necessarily a theme color and generally speaking I’ll refer to these for the moment as standard color, so that’s one of these, then although it’d be a perfectly valid choice, it won’t necessarily fit in with the theme that you’ve chosen. Now apart from the colors that are available for selection, there we can click on More Colors and that takes us into the Color Picker itself where we can either select from this hexagon here and then just click within a color there and you can compare the current selection which is the automatic which defaults to black here with the color we’ve selected above it in this split box here, so visually try different colors. Or you can go into the Custom tab and in the Custom tab, you can select a color either using this color chart here or by typing the RGB codes, the RedGreen-Blue codes or indeed switching and using the HSL Codes. So on this occasion, I’m going to stick with this selection here and I’m going to click on OK and I’ve now got a new font color for the selected paragraph. Now I’d like to look at one or two other things in relation to character formatting. One of them is let me now select the paragraph above the one where we’ve just changed the color of the font. And note when I release the mouse button, I do see the mini toolbar. And of course, a mini toolbar is another way of accessing most of the commands that we’ve just looked at, so we can use it to change font or font size. We can do the size up or the decrease font size. And we also have options there for font color, text highlight color, and then bold, italic, and underline. So the mini toolbar can be used for that. Similarly, if I go to the paragraph above that, touch the screen, I’ll just dismiss the on-screen keyboard and then drag to select the paragraph or even if I like just part of the paragraph, then when I tap within the selected part, it brings up the minibar and the minibar also has that same number of character formatting commands. So I can change the font there. I can change the font size, increase, decrease, bold, italic, underline, etc. So they’re available in both mouse mode and touch mode. Now there’s just one other important thing to go through in character formatting and that is to look at what happens with the dialog box Launcher in the bottom right of the Font Group on the Home tab because with that dialog box, we have all of the same options arranged in a more

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Learn Word 2013 traditional, conventional kind of way. So for instance the font choices here, the font style is this list in the middle, the size is over here. Then we have font color choice, underline style choice. There are many underline styles to choose from. And then we have strike through, double strike through, superscript, subscript, etc. But then we also have some Advanced Settings. Now I’m not particularly going to go through the advanced setting on this course. They’re beyond the scope of the course. But we can adjust things like character spacing, that’s the spacing between the characters. If you want to condense the font, to tighten the character up, and make them a little bit closer together or to space them out a little bit more you can do that. And you also have open type features such as the ability to do ligatures. And you can also go into number spacing, number form, stylistic sets; a number of different options. And with these you have a preview facility down here. Now these are beyond the scope of this course, but again, every options for you to look at, particularly if you need to achieve some kind of advanced styles of typography. And then you also have from here text effects and the text effects include the ability to fill text and to outline text; effectively to build some of the artistic effects that we saw earlier on. So they are the main character formatting options. We’ll be doing quite a bit of character formatting from now on, on the course. I leave you to experiment with those and I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Alignment; Line and Paragraph Spacing; Indent Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to carry on looking at formatting but we’re going to turn our attention to paragraph formatting. Now the significant thing about paragraph formatting is, as the name implies, that generally applies to a paragraph. And although there are a couple of little caveats on this, in principle, when you apply paragraph formatting, it will always apply to at least one paragraph. You don’t even have to select the whole of the paragraph first in order to apply paragraph formatting. Now I’m going to demonstrate one or two of the basic features using the first paragraph in this document. So first of all, I place the cursor somewhere within the paragraph; it doesn’t really matter where as long as it’s in there. So it’s in there between the words The and Video. And then on the Home tab one of the groups is Paragraph and I’m going to look first at this, the Alignment buttons. By default, using the template that I’m using here, paragraphs are left align, which means the left hand edge of the paragraph is straight. It’s aligned with a vertical line here, but the right end is what’s called ragged, it’s not straight. So this is justified left or what a printer would call ragged right. Now the second option here is what’s called center or center aligned. And if I click on Center, the paragraph is now center aligned which means that both the left and the right edge are ragged. The third option is align right. Now we have a straight edge on the right and its ragged left. And the final option is what’s called justified or justify. Now the principle of justify is that it’s straight on the left and straight on the right except for the last line, the last line may not be aligned on the right for obvious reasons, to stretch that out to the right and align with the right would leave some pretty big spaces between the words; so that’s justify. Again, if I click into the second paragraph, justify, there you’ve got three lines aligned on the left and on the right and the fourth line is ragged on the right. Now we’re going to look at some of the other paragraph formatting options, but before we do, I’d like to point out something that’s really very important. When you are usually working in Word 2013, you will not be formatting individual paragraphs in the way that we’re doing it here. What I’m really showing you here is what the paragraph formatting options, tools, and techniques are so that you can be familiar with the terminology and see what the possibilities are.

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Learn Word 2013 But in reality the way that you would actually set these up is in a much more efficient and effective way using styles and themes and templates so that you don’t usually have to worry about formatting individual paragraphs. Having said that, let’s look at some of the other formatting options for paragraphs. These four buttons that we just looked at were the ones for alignment. The one to the right of those is one that can be used to govern line and paragraph spacing. Now let’s start with line spacing. If you look at that first line “Video provides a powerful way”, you’ll see that between that and the next line, not between the paragraphs but between the lines in a paragraph there’s a certain amount of space. And you may want to increase or decrease that space either to make the paragraph more readable or to squeeze a little bit more content into the space available or to suit the style that you’re using for this document. And you can do that by adjusting line spacing. So let me show you some line spacing on paragraph one, click on the drop down, and I’m going to go for three line spacing. I’ll just do the live preview. Notice how spaced out the lines are and also notice that this only applies to the paragraph currently selected, which is the one that the cursor, the insertion point is in. And using live preview, I can see the affect of all of these different line spacing options. Now if I go right down to one, you’ll see that at one the spacing is probably slightly less than in the other paragraph. So the real spacing will be indicated by this 1.15. Now the spacing that’s set in any document that you’re working on will depend on a number of things. It will depend on the template you’re using, the local options, and the way we setup and so on, and of course the use of any styles or any changes somebody else has made. But you’ve got a pretty free reign there in terms of how much line spacing you can setup. And apart from these preset figures that we’ve seen, if you go down there a little bit, we get line spacing options, dot, dot, dot, click on that, and unsurprisingly you get a dialog. Now this dialog is the one that really covers all of the paragraph options and as you look at each of the options with the Paragraph Group on the Home tab they’re each special cases of part of this dialog or at least most of them are anyway. So for instance the line spacing setting here that we were using just now from the Paragraph Group corresponds to this part of the dialog here where it says line spacing. And if you wanted to experiment with some different spacing’s you could say I’m going to go for Exactly and then you could say something like 10 point line spacing. So you can

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Learn Word 2013 choose in a much more flexible way exactly what spacing you want. That gives you a lot more options than the ones that come straight off of the drop down that we were just using. So having looked at line spacing, let’s take a look at paragraph spacing. If I click within the second paragraph and then bring up the Paragraph dialog. I’m going to leave it just where it is there. There is a section of that that says Spacing and the paragraph spacing part is the left hand part. The right hand part, the line spacing is the one that we dealt with just now. Now at the moment for this paragraph and in fact for every other paragraph in this document, the spacing is before zero points and after eight points. Now you can actually achieve spacing with any combination of before and after, but very often people set the before spacing as zero point to make sure that the very first paragraph in the document has no excess spacing before it. And then by saying eight points afterwards, the eight points after each paragraph provides enough space to separate it from the following paragraph. Now you can adjust these figures in any way you want to achieve any affect that you want. So for instance, if I wanted to increase the spacing for one paragraph I could put more space after it or I could put some space before as well. Let’s say with paragraph two that I set those to pretty big numbers; then, of course, only paragraph two is selected because that’s where I’ve got the cursor. Click on OK and I’ll only get that big spacing around paragraph two. But I could set each paragraph differently. I could select many paragraphs and set them the same. A lot of flexibility in setting paragraph spacing. Now as I’ve indicated already, very often the controls, the buttons that are on the Ribbon are a straightforward simple version of some much more flexible controls. And one of the other things you can setup on a paragraph is an Indent. Again, I’ve got the second paragraph selected. I haven’t, of course, got to select it as long as I have the cursor in that paragraph. And what I’m going to do is to increase the indent. Now if you’re not quite sure what an indent is, you’ll see in a moment. There’s two buttons up here, Decrease Indent and Increase Indent. If I click on Increase Indent, look what happens; the paragraph is indented from the left by a fixed amount. I could increase the indent again and similarly I can use the other button to decrease the indent. And if I want a more flexible, powerful way of dealing with indents then I go into the Paragraph dialog and the second section down here, Indentation, I can choose a left indent, a right indent, mirror indents will make them the same if I check that, and then I also have a special facility

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Learn Word 2013 over here and one of the options is first line indent and another one is hanging indent. Now let me quickly show you what those do. Let’s set a first line indent of say 1 inch, click on OK, and what happens is that just the first line of the paragraph is indented.

This is a sort of

typographical effect that printers used to use, some still do, and you may still like this. I think it’s probably seen as slightly old fashioned nowadays but some people still like to do it. Let’s undo that, go back into the Paragraph dialog again, and now I’ll show you what a hanging indent is. Again, I’ll do it with say a 1 inch hanging indent and that pretty much does the opposite really because what it does is it leaves the first line hard up against the left but all of the other lines are indented in this case by 1 inch. Now at this point I’d like to quickly go to the View tab and on the View tab, I want to click on Ruler and bring the ruler back. Now in this case what I’m going to do is to stick with the second paragraph where we’ve done this hanging indent and show you a different way of doing a hanging indent because if you look at the ruler, there are some markers there that are actually usable, first line indent marker if I hover over it and this one which is called hanging indent. And instead of using the Paragraph dialog for these indents, you can in fact achieve them by sliding those markers. So you could have a first line indent of roughly half an inch and then a hanging indent which is an additional inch, so it’s 1.5 inch in total indent. So that shows you one way in which you can use the ruler alongside these dialogs in order to adjust your Word documents visually to the settings that you want to use. So in this section we’ve looked at the basic paragraph formatting options and in the next section we’re going to look at the rest, which include the ability to fill, to color in a paragraph, but also to draw a border around a paragraph as well. So please join me for that.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Fill/Shading; Border Tab; Format Painter Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In the preceding section, we looked at the main ways of formatting a paragraph. And in this section, we’ve got two or three more options to look at and we’re also going to look at one or two of the other issues arising from copying and pasting formatting. So on this occasion, I’m going to put the cursor into the third paragraph which is a left align paragraph. We haven’t done anything special to the third paragraph at all at the moment. And what we’re going to do is to apply fill to that paragraph. And I’m going to do it in two ways. First of all, I’m going to do it using the mouse. So there is a button here called Shading in the Paragraph Group on the Home tab, click on that and it gives me access to the color picker. Now at the moment, there is no shading on that paragraph. I’m going to choose one of the theme colors. And so I’m going to go with I think that one, click on that, click away, and that paragraph is now shaded. Now notice this is not the same as highlighting text. It’s not the same as coloring the text. It means that the paragraph is shaded. Note that even though it’s a left aligned paragraph the shading goes from a straight left edge to a straight right edge. Let’s put shading in this indented paragraph above it and I’ll choose a different color. Again, a theme color; I’m going to use that one. Again, the shading applies from the left edge to the right edge. Its shading of the paragraph not of the text and it’s not something like highlighting either. Now I’m going to apply fill or shading to the first paragraph, but this time I’m going to do it using touch. So I’m going to switch to touch mode and I’ve still got pretty much the same commands available to me. Touch within the paragraph, the first paragraph, and then within the Paragraph Group on the Home tab which obviously I’ve got the same buttons basically, but they’re spaced out a lot more. I’m now going to tap the Fill or Shading button, same drop down, but notice how the theme colors and the standard colors, etc. are much bigger in this version. This is another difference when you’re using touch. Using touch to select a color from a tiny little palette of colors will be incredibly difficult. So in Word 2013, the palette of colors you’re offered although it’s got the same colors in it, has a much bigger touch sensitive palette for you

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Learn Word 2013 to choose from. So again I’m going to go for a theme color. I’m going to go for that one. Tap that color and I’ve achieved exactly the same thing using touch. The next thing I’m going to do is to add a border to the first paragraph. Now in order to do that, there is a specific button in the Paragraph Group on the Home tab and if I click there, its screen tip is Borders, click there, and I’m given a range of possible borders. Now again, it’s live preview so I can preview what will happen with each of these. I’m going to go for the All Borders option, that one. Now whichever option I choose appears then as the little thumbnail on the button so that if I wanted to do the same command again, it’s available as a sort of one click option there. If I decided say to go for just a bottom border, click bottom border, bottom border would’ve become the thumbnail on that button instead.

And then if I’d gone to another

paragraph and I wanted to do the same thing, selected the second one for instance, I could apply a bottom border just by doing that Now apart from this way of choosing from this sort of gallery of available borders, there is a dialog that you can use to control borders and it’s the Borders and Shading dialog; click on that. It appears and with the Borders and Shading dialog not only can you adjust the borders and the shading but within a border you can control the style, the color of the border, the width of the border, and then you’ve got a preview facility to let you know what it would look like. Now, I currently have the second paragraph selected so let’s build up a more sophisticated border around the second paragraph. So first of all, let me suppose that I want a different style of border. So I want to have say a three, a triple line around it, and I want to change the color of it. I want to make the color of the border a sort of very dark green. So let me go for that very dark green there and then maybe wider. It’s only 0.5 point wide. Let’s make it say 1.5 points wide. Now having chosen that new style, all I need to do to apply it, note this says Apply to paragraph. All I need to do to apply it is to then click that on whichever of the size of the paragraph I want to apply that new border to. So say I want it on the left side and the right side only. I have no idea why I’d want to do that, but supposing that I do. If I then click on OK, then that’s exactly the effect I’ll achieve. I’ll have

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Learn Word 2013 got that border on the left and the right side and, of course, the original border along the bottom is still there. Now the next piece of paragraph formatting is a little different from the others, but it’s also an important thing to know about. So first of all, I’m going to go right back to the beginning of this document which means I can use the keyboard shortcut Control and Home to go to the beginning of the document. And then if I want to put a paragraph in at the beginning, I’d normally just press the Enter key to make an empty paragraph. Now one of the issues there, of course, is that that picks up the formatting of the paragraph that was there, but we know how to do that. If we select that particular character, go to Home, and click on Clear Formatting, the whole of that paragraph is cleared. And in that paragraph what I’m now going to do is to type the word One, then I’m going to press the Tab key, enter Two, press the Tab key, Three, and finally at the end press the Enter key again. And now I’m going to show the ruler, so that’s on the View tab, click on Ruler, and you’ll see these do line up pretty well. You’ll see that in Word 2013, the tabs are set at half inch intervals. So in this case, you’ve got the One is at the left edge there, the 0.5 inch, the half inch, that’s where the tab for the two is set, and so on. That’s the default in Word 2013. Now within one paragraph or a selection of paragraphs or all the paragraphs in a document, we can set the tabs to non-default values. And you may guess if I go to Home and click on the dialog box Launcher for Paragraph Settings in the Paragraph Group, one of the options there right down at the bottom there’s a button, tabs. Click on tabs and then the tab stop positions can be manually entered and manually changed. Now if there are no tab stop positions and there are no tab stop positions here at the moment, then it picks up the defaults and the spacing for the default tab stops if you’re using inches are half inches, as I pointed out just now. But if you wanted to put your own tab stop positions in you could. So for instance, supposing I was going to set a tab stop at 1 inch. Now if I type a one, I then choose what alignment I want for that. Let’s suppose I want that to be left aligned. And then I can also say whether I want a tab leader. That is dots or dashes or something leading up to that tab. Now I’m going to have no tab leader for that. So I’m going to click on Set for that. Now I’m going to add another one. I’m going to set this at say 2 inches. Again, left aligned, no tab leader, Set; 3 inches, left aligned, no tab

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Learn Word 2013 leader, Set. And then finally I’m going to finish off with my last tab as a right align tab. I’m going to set this at say 5 inches, right aligned, and I’m going to have a dotted tab leader. So I’m going to set that. So I’ve got a tab at 1 inch, 2 inch, 3 inch, and a tab at 5 inch which is a right align tab with a tab leader dots. Click on OK and you can see the affect. The first word on the line in the paragraph, One, of course is left aligned on the paragraph. Tab to two, tab to three, tab to four, and then the fourth tab which has got the word Five against it is a right aligned tab with a dotted leader. Now having set these up they appear on my ruler and I can move them around on the ruler. So for instance, I could move that right tab around a bit if I wanted to, similarly that left tab I could move that one around, and I can always go back into the dialog and change any of these tabs. Now notice these will only apply to the paragraph or paragraphs I had selected when I did this, which at the moment is only that first paragraph. So I have just one other thing to show you about paragraph formatting at the moment, although in fact it’s about formatting more generally and that’s the use of the Format Painter which is in the Clipboard Group on the Home tab. I did mention it briefly much earlier on in the course. Let’s suppose you wanted to apply the formatting of this green paragraph to one of the others. Now bear in mind that it’s got not only a fill and an indent but it’s also got this strange border with a triple border left to right and a single border underneath. So if you wanted to do that to another paragraph, it would involve quite a bit of work, but you can actually paint formats using Word 2013. So if you select this paragraph and then click Format Painter and then all you need to do is to click inside the target paragraph. I’m going to make this bottom one, the one that begins with the words Reading is, click inside there and you’ll see that all aspects of that formatting have been applied to that last paragraph; the indents, the borders, the coloring, and any other formatting that we’d applied to it. So that is a great way of taking what might be quite a complex format and applying it very easily to another part of a document or indeed to another document. So now it’s time for your next exercise. I’ve provided you with an example-05. It’s a very straightforward document. It’s got about a dozen lines in it. It’s got a heading Character Formatting and then a list of features: font, font size, bold, italic, underline, text effect, text highlight, and font color. And then it’s got another heading, Paragraph Formatting and another

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Learn Word 2013 list: alignment, line spacing, paragraph spacing, hanging indent, fill or shading, and border. Now these are some of the topics we’ve covered while we’ve been looking at formatting in Word 2013 and your next little job is to produce a document which will be example-06 and my example is example-06 in the ones provided to you. But it must be a document of your making with all of these things demonstrated in it. So a change of font, a change of font size, bold, italic or underline or preferably all three, etc. etc. right through to at least one paragraph which is filled, at least one paragraph with a border, and so on; so a demonstration of all of these effects. Now that requires quite a few things in it and you can check that list because it’s all in example05 and you may think that sounds like a heck of a lot of typing. Well you can overcome that problem if you want to by cheating a little bit and using that RAND function that I’ve used a couple of times already. Remember you need to type in equals, RAND, and then a pair of brackets and you get some random text. But you can actually improve that a little bit. If instead of just typing equals, random, brackets, you put say RAND 3, comma, 4 what you get is three paragraphs with four lines in each. So there’s your three paragraphs with four lines in each. Or you can do say two paragraphs with eight lines in each, equals RAND, 2, 8. That’s two paragraphs with eight lines in each and so on. So in that way you can build up a lot of text to demonstrate a lot of things. And to be honest with you that’s how I’m going to cheat with example-06 as well. But we do need some nice big body of text to demonstrate all those changes and I want to make sure that you know what each of them involves. So that’s the exercise for you to do now and if you get stuck or if you want to compare it with mine, mine is example-06. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 15 – Lists Video: Bulleted, Numbered and Multilevel Lists Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at Lists. You may have noticed earlier on when we looked at paragraph formatting that there was a little group of buttons, the top left hand group within the Paragraph Group on the Home tab that I didn’t mention. These correspond to Lists. Now it’s really quite a common occurrence that a document you’re preparing requires a list to be made. For example when I was preparing the storyboard for this particular lesson, I started to write down the things that I needed to cover; so Introduction and then I soon had quite a long list of topics that I wanted to cover as part of this course. Now a conventional way of presenting something like this in a document is to use a list. And it’s basically a very straightforward thing to do because all you have to do is to select the items that go into the list and then on the Home tab in the Paragraph Group, top left hand corner one of the buttons is labeled Bullets. And if I click on Bullets, they’re turned into a bullet point list, and it really is as straightforward as that. And to the right of that button is another one that has the screen tip of Numbering. Click on Numbering and I get a numbered list instead. Now, of course, the major difference between these is that a numbered list implies a sequence and perhaps more importantly than that if you want to refer to the items in a list then having them numbered has a great advantage because you can say Point 4 or Point 7 say in this list. Whereas with the bulleted list, it’s much more difficult to refer to a specific item. Now once you’ve setup a bulleted or numbered list, then whilst you’re working within the list, the bulleting or numbering will be maintained. So for example, if I typed after item three there what types are there, put the cursor at the end of that line, after the question mark, and hit the Enter key to enter some more data, watch what happens.

The new item automatically is

numbered four and the others have their numbers increased to accommodate it. Similarly, if I put the cursor at the end of the last item, nine, and press Enter, Word 2013 assumes I want to continue the list and numbers the next item ten in the sequence.

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Learn Word 2013 Now I’m going to return this list to being a bulleted list for the moment and I’m going to look at some ways that you can customize a bulleted list. If you look at the drop down to the right of the button we used to create the list, there are a number of options on there. At the top, you have a list of recently used bullets. Well, the only bullet used so far is this black circle, this point. There is a Bullet Library and as usual you have a live preview, the various ways that the bullets can look. And then further down on the menu, you have two other important sets of options. One of them is to change the list level. I’ll come back to that in just a little while. But then you can also define a new bullet. So you can use a symbol. We’ve seen this list of available symbols when we looked at inserting a symbol earlier on. You can choose one of those symbols for your bullet list. You can even choose a picture, and the dialog here let’s you choose a picture from a file, from the Office.com ClipArt, you can do a Bing Image Search, and so on. And if you’re using a symbol or other font character, then you can go into the Font dialog box option here and set things like the font color, underline color if ones needed, and so on. So there’s a lot of flexibility there in the bullets that you can use in a bulleted list. Now there is also a lot of flexibility when it comes to numbered lists, and I’ve now returned this to being a numbered list. If you look at the drop down to the right of the numbering button, we used to create this list in the first place, click on the drop down, you have there recently used number formats, well that’s the one that we’ve got at the moment. It’s the normal numeral, full stop, and then the list item. We have other options. Again, I’ll show you them in live preview. So you can have one with brackets instead of full stops. You could have Roman Numerals. You could have upper case letters, lower case letters, lower case Roman Numerals, and so on; so quite a few options there as well. If you go down again, you’ve got this Change List Level thing that I’ll talk about in a little while. And you can also define a new number format. So you could go in there and define your own numbering style. Now to some extent this is going to be particularly advantageous when we come to looking at outlines of documents later on. But it’s also very useful within a numbered list as well, as we’ll see in a little while. You may also have noticed on that menu there towards the bottom, there’s “Set numbering value”. You could split a numbered list into parts and continue the number at another point later on in a document. Let me just show you how you can do that.

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Learn Word 2013 So let’s suppose that I’ve made a list of 10 things as I have here, but halfway through I need to do something else for a little while. Say I’m going to put a note in here to the effect of saying, I’m not really sure that I need these other five. If I put the cursor after the fifth item to the right of the line, after the question mark, press the Enter key, of course, I get number six. Now if I go up to the button we’ve used already in the Paragraph Group for numbering and unclick it, that line is no longer numbered, it’s no longer part of the numbered list. So I might write something like this. Now notice that although I’ve got a piece of text here which is not part of the list, the list carries on afterwards to item six where it left off after item five. Now I may or may not want that to happen. And I can actually if I go say here to item six, if I go back up to the menu there and then down to set numbering value. Now if I have “Start new list” selected which is what it’s selected for me it says “Set the value for the new list to six”. So it’s really treating these as two lists, but it started the second one at six. If I were to set the second one back to one and click on OK watch what happens. I now have two separate lists going one to five and, as I said just now, that may or may not be what I wanted to happen. So if what I really wanted was for this list to carry on from that one, I can either set it up as a list to continue from or I can give it an independent start number that carries on from here anyway. Doing it as a continuation is better though because if I do that, if I make a change to the first list, the second one will keep track. Now let me show you how to do that, but I’m not going to use the button in the Paragraph Group, I’m going to write click on this line, the one, the line one of the second list. And there are a number of options available there related to lists and one of them is Continue numbering. So let me select Continue numbering and that means that if I type a new value here, Word 2013 will automatically update the starting value for the second list. Now it’s also possible to setup multilevel lists and I’m going to create one here as an example using the list we’ve got already. So first of all, I’m going to select that line I put in the middle which is not part of the list. I’m going to click on Delete and what I’m going to do is to take the second line, I’m going to select the second line. Note by the way that the basic list commands are on the mini toolbar, so you can do your bulleting and your numbering there and both of them have got their drop downs. So that’s pretty handy as well. But on this occasion I’m going to take the second line and what I’m going to do is I am going to indent it. Now watch what

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Learn Word 2013 happens when I indent it. First of all, I’m just going to use this button here, the increase indent button, watch what happens. That item is no longer item two. It’s an item within item one. So it’s a second level item. If I did the same with the new item two and again increase the indent, that also is not numbered now; it becomes part of a multilevel list. So in the context of what I was doing here, the structure can be the structure of the sort of Table of Contents for my lesson about lists. So let me do a little bit more tidying up on this list, make it more of a structured list. I’ll be back in just a moment. So I typed quite a few more list items in there. I put them in various places and now I’m going to tidy it all up a bit. I’m going to start with an Introduction and then I really want a section on bulleted lists. Now I entered Bulleted Lists there but it’s gone in as under a main heading. So what I’m going to do is I’m going to decrease the indent for that. Similarly, Numbered List is another heading so that should be out there. Multilevel list should be out there as well. Now one of the next points, the point that’s number five here, are there optional shapes for the bullets? That should be part of my bulleted list item. You can do this quite easily. If you move the cursor out until it changes to an arrow and then selected, move the cursor back, click on the item, and drag it to be just below bulleted, and then indent it. Now that’s better. So I’ve got Bulleted List, “Are there optional shapes for the bullets?” Next item I’ve got number five, “Where are the commands?” That’s a general question really, so that should be up in this section and then that can be indented. And as you can see, you can really start to get a shape really to the overall contents of this lesson plan. Now I’m going to do the same with the rest of these and then I’ll join you again in just a moment. And there is my multilevel list. I can, of course, extend it beyond two levels. It only has two at the moment. So for instance, if I wanted to extend to a third, if I put the cursor after what is a list there, press the Enter key, whenever I start a new line it assumes that it’s going to be at the same level as the line I started it from, but then I can, of course, indent one further level. So I could indent there and get a third level of the list or clearly I could go back the other way and make this another top level heading. And then, of course, I can change the formatting of the list if I want to. So for instance if I selected the whole list and then went to this third button in the Paragraph Group, the one that’s called Multilevel List, click on the drop down, there is a gallery there of

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Learn Word 2013 available numbering systems for a multilevel list. That one’s a pretty complicated one. Another one there which give the sort of library classification type numbering system: 1, 1.1, 1.1.1, and so on. And then I also have one that’s purely based on bullets. So for instance, if I went for that numbering system, the list would look like that. You may have noticed when we’ve looked at these menus for the bulleted list, the numbered list, and the multilevel list, each of them has a None option. You can, if you choose the None option you still get the structure but you don’t get any markings on it at all. So let’s revert back to say that one and we have a multilevel list. So that just leaves us with a little exercise for you to do. I’ve chosen a pretty easy one this time. All I want you to do is to make a multilevel list. It needs to cover up to five rooms in your house, apartment, flat, whatever you live in, and in each of those five rooms I want you to list the three largest items. So in my house in the master bedroom the three physically largest items are a wardrobe, the bed, and a chest of drawers. So, up to five rooms; if you’ve got five rooms, five rooms would be great, and then three items, the three biggest items in each room. You can include members of the family if they’re big. So that’s it on lists. My answer to that is example07. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 16 – Managing Document Video: File Formats Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at managing documents and in particular we’re going to look at handling different formats of document in Word 2013. And the first thing I want to do is to talk about the standard types of Word document. Now, first of all, I’d like to open an old document, one that was created in a version of Word before Word 2007. So I’m going to click on File, Open. I’m going to go to Computer, to the exercise files folder, and there’s one in there, it’s called Roberto Mancini.doc. Now so far the documents we’ve looked at have a .docx extension. And if you look here at the screen tip that appears there, it says Type: Microsoft Word 97 – 2003 document. It’s an old format of document. But I’m still going to open it and I’m going to talk about some of the issues with older formats of document. Now the first thing to note is that when it opens, I see an expression in the top, Compatibility Mode. And what Compatibility Mode means in essence is that although I’m using the latest version of Word, Word 2013, I’m able to read older documents and to deal with the format of older documents. But there are a couple of issues with this. Now one of the issues arises from the fact that if you know people that only have older versions of Word, so versions of Word older than Word 2007, then if you want to give them a copy of this document then in theory at least you need to give them one in the old format because basically if you converted this to the new format, which we are going to do in a moment, but if you converted it to the new format then people wouldn’t be able to read the new format. They wouldn’t be able to open the document. Now that’s not actually quite true because there is a compatibility tool available free from Microsoft that people with older versions of Word can download and install which enables them to read the new format in an old version of Word. So the first thing to note is that if you do have people with an old version of Word, for some reason, they either don’t want to upgrade or they prefer the old version, whatever the reason might be.

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Learn Word 2013 Maybe they like the old menu system; they don’t like the Ribbon. Then you could still let them have a copy of this document in the new format, provided that they installed the free compatibility tool from Microsoft to enable them to read the new format on an old version of Word. However, there is a complication even on top of that. So let’s have a look at what this complication is. Suppose I want to apply some text effects and typography to this document. If I select say the first paragraph and then go to the Font Group on the Home tab to do some text effects, watch what happens. As I come to that command, I get a warning message: Text effects and typography. This command is currently disabled. This document has been opened in compatibility mode. To use this feature convert your document to a new file format by clicking the File tab and then clicking Convert. Now the problem is that several of the new features of Word that have come in, in the versions of 2007, 2010, 2013, have features which are not supported in the old format and therefore if I apply those to this document, it would have to be as a document in the new format. So I would have to convert it to the new format first. Then if I try to save it in the old format, I wouldn’t be able to save those features. So you should be able to see from this what the problem is. If you use any recent feature of Word, you can’t save the file in the old format. And even though people can open new format files in an old copy of Word, in an old version of Word, they won’t be able to see those new features.

So you have to be extremely careful about this because if you’ve got a pretty

straightforward document like this with normal text in it and no special features, then saving it in the old mode is probably going to be fine, people are going to be able to read it. Even if you saved it in the new document format, provided they had the compatibility tool from Microsoft, they could open it in their old copy of Word, but that would be no good if you tried to use any of the new features of Word. So let’s suppose that you really did want to make the change, you wanted to put a bit of artistic effects on here. The first thing you can do then is to convert the file. You can into Backstage View and then on the Info tab, one of the options is Convert. Note what it says there about compatibility mode. Some new features are disabled to prevent problems when working with previous versions of Office. Converting this file will enable these features but may result in layout changes. It’s generally not possible to produce a version with the new features in it

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Learn Word 2013 completely intact and accurate that can be accessed from an old version of Word. But what Word tries to do is to sort of make a best effort at putting as much of it in as possible. So let’s convert this particular file, click on Convert. Warning. You’re document will be upgraded to the newest file format. While you’ll get to use all the new features in Word, this may cause minor layout changes. If you prefer not to upgrade press Cancel. Converting allows you to use all the new features of Word and reduces the size of your file. So click on OK and we now have the document in the new format. It’s still got that same name, .doc, Word, but it no longer says Compatibility Mode up there. So let’s now select that first paragraph and apply the artistic effects. Let’s go for a nice bit of text effect there. Let’s go back in, we’ll look for what have we got for shadow. Let’s have that sort of shadow. Let’s make that a bit bigger as well. There we are. Okay. So there’s that text effects on the first paragraph only. Now bearing in mind that Word has converted this file to the new format when I come to save it I want to save it with a new name; I want to call it Roberto Mancini 1.doc. Now watch this. File, Save As, on My Computer. Now automatically this will convert it to the new format, Word documents, *.docx. Supposing I want to call it Roberto Mancini 1 and I want to put it in the old format, so this is the 97 – 2003 format, and now click on Save. Note: Microsoft Word compatibility checker. The following features in this document are not supported by earlier versions of Word. It gives me summary of what it will not be able to include in that old version and it basically says the text effects will be removed. And basically that’s the thing you need to be aware of. As we’re now at the 2013 version of Word and the 2010 and 2007 versions have the same format, this problem is not as prevalent as it was just a few years ago, but you still have the issue that there are people with much older versions of Word and you’ll very often have to convert older documents as well. So it’s worth knowing that even though you’ve got the compatibility tool, even though you can do the conversion, there are many features in newer versions of Word that cannot be represented in older versions. So that is something to be very aware of. So let’s look at some of the other file extensions associated with Word and what they mean and I’m going to do that just by doing a File, Save As here, and then double click on Computer, and then Save As Type I’m going to click on the drop down there and look at the list of types. Now

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Learn Word 2013 the default type *.docx is the current Word format and that’s the one you’ll use for Word documents in the current format and it’s compatible with all the versions of Word from 2007 onward so far. I mentioned a couple of times Macros and Programming Word. If you have to include Macros, then you need a format for a Macro enabled document and the extension we use there is .docm. Now we don’t cover Macros on this course, but if you do .docm will be the extension you use to indicate a Word document that is enabled for Macros. The .doc, the one we’ve been talking about so far in this section is a Word 97 – 2003 document format. And Word Templates that we’re going to talk about a little bit later on in the course, by default have a .dotx extension. If you combine Macro-enabled and a template, you get a .dotm format, D-O-T-M. And for the older format, the template format that corresponds to the old Word format, a Word 97 – 2003 template, has .dot format. Now those formats, the ones we’ve covered so far up to there, are the ones specifically associated with this version of Word and the previous version other than a couple of specials that we’ll look at in a moment. So now let’s look at some of these other important formats. The first of the others is PDF format, Adobe PDF format. Word has been able to output in PDF format for a long time now and it’s a very important option, which I’ll return to later on. And Microsoft’s equivalent of that, the XPS document format, which to be fair hasn’t really caught on quite as much as PDF format, but if you use primarily Microsoft software and you do file interchange, then XPS document format can be a useful one. But then we get to the webpage formats. Now I’m going to look at webpages a little bit later on in the course. But in summary, you can save a document as a webpage and if you save it as a webpage, .htm or .html file, then you will also save in a folder with it associated images and so on. There is a way of saving it as a single file webpage in which the images and so on are included within the same file and that’s the .mht or .mhtml format. We have rich text format which has been around with Word probably pretty much as long as Word has as well. And .rtf format is useful in that some other word processing and text processing packages can take .rtf format. Alongside .rtf format, we have plain text .txt format. Plain text .txt format, of course, has no formatting information; .rtf has rich text formatting. You can do some formatting in terms of fonts, font sizes, and certain other font and paragraph characteristics and so on. It’s not as rich as Word itself is but it does have the advantage that it’s reasonably

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Learn Word 2013 universal between a number of word processing and desktop publishing packages and so on. We then have these three other Word formats that I mentioned which are the ones associated with .xml. Now .xml is also outside the scope of this course and I don’t intend to go into these here, but they are supported within Word 2013. And finally there is the open document text format, .odt. So that covers all of the formats available for saving from Word. Now I’d like to talk a little bit about opening documents now. So far we’ve been looking at saving them and the different formats. Let’s take one of these straightforward documents that we worked on earlier on, this one called Video provides.docx. Word isn’t actually running at the moment, but to open that document I don’t have to open Word and then open the document. I can just double click on the document. So if I double click on the name Video provides.docx, it of course opens in Word and so I can immediately get to work on editing the document. Another important point is that if I’m working on a document, there’s nothing to stop me having other documents as well. So I’ve got Video provides.docx open here. I can say File. I can click on Open and I’m going to go to one of the recent documents. I’m going to look at that list document that I looked at before. And now I’m going to open another document and I’m going to open that document. And so now I’ve got three documents open in total. To switch between them, there are a number of ways of doing it. If I go to the View Menu, one of the options on there is Switch Windows. That lists the three documents that I’ve got open. A tick is on the one that’s currently selected. To switch to one of the others, I just select that and that document is now the one that the cursor is in and I’m working on. And I’d just like to point out one important point which is particularly relevant if you’re used to older versions of Word. In previous versions of Word, if you say had three documents open as I have now, if you close Word, so you use the Close button in the top right, you’re not closing an individual document, you’re closing Word itself. When you close Word, it goes through each of the documents and asks if you want to save it. With Word 2013, each document exists in its own window. So if say with Video provides.docx, I close Word with the X in the top right hand corner, it will only close Word for that document, the other two are still there and still running;

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Learn Word 2013 so again List.docx, close that, etc. So each of those has its own existence, which is a change in Word 2013. So now I have a relatively straightforward exercise again for you to do. You produced your own version of example-07; this is my version, with a multilevel list in it. I’d like to save that in the old Word format, so that’s the 97 – 2003 format, a .doc file, and I’d also like you to save it in PDF format, and assuming that you have Adobe Reader installed, just make sure that you can read it okay in Adobe Reader. My versions of those two are example-08.doc and example08.pdf. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 17 – Page Setup and Printing Video: Printing Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at printing in Word and in particular in this section, we’re going to look at the basics of printing, how to choose a printer, some of the main setup options that are available. And then in later sections, we’re going to look at some more advanced features related to page layout and also some of the other features related to printing such as mail merge, which are key features for the use of Word for many people. So let’s get started on basic printing first. In order to demonstrate basic printing what I’ve done is take the Video provides document that we’ve used a few times already and I’ve replicated the text several times within the document to make it a six page document; you’ll see why in a little while. If I want to print the document, the standard way to do it is to go into Backstage View, so click on File, and one of the options in Backstage View is Print. Click on Print and now I have this Print Page. Now the contents of the Print Page, broadly speaking, are a preview area on the right and then we have a big Print button here, the number of copies to print is in this little control on the right here. We have a printer. At the moment my printer says Send to One Note 2013. And then we have a number of settings and the settings are what we’re really going to be talking about in the rest of this section. When you’ve been using Word 2013 for a while, you’ll probably have all of these settings including your choice of printer setup as the default for you. And very often when you want to print one copy of a document, all you would need to do is to come into Backstage View, go to Print, and click the big Print button, and you’ll get one copy of the document on the default printer with the default settings and it’s as simple as that. In fact, you can make it even simpler than that as we’ll see later on. But the key thing now is to understand what these settings do and how they may affect and be affected by the printer or printers that you use, and that’s really what we’re going to concentrate on in this section. So let’s look a bit more closely at this Print Page within Backstage View. If you look at the area on the right, this enables us to preview the document. Now at the moment, the document has a

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Learn Word 2013 lot of text in it. I haven’t done things like put a header on a page or a footer on a page. I haven’t even inserted the page numbers. These are things that we’re going to do a little bit later on in the course. But you can see on this preview area here pretty much exactly what the page is going to look like if you print it. So this is your sort of last chance to make sure you’re happy with the document before you print it. So down here, you have a sort of page counter. It says 4 of 6 at the moment, that’s the current page. You can use the arrows, previous page and next page to take you through the pages one at a time or you can click directly into that box and type the page number that you want. So if I wanted to go straight to page 2, that’d take me to page 2. And of course, that’s particularly useful if you’re dealing with a very long document. On the right here, you have a zoom slider. This enables you to zoom in or zoom out on the page that you’re looking at. It’s currently on 55%. If I zoom in using the plus here, it takes me in multiples of ten, so up to 60, then it goes 70, etc. enables me to zoom in as much as I like. And then also we have a scroll bar. I can click with the mouse, usual way, up and down, or if I wanted to use my finger I can just drag it with my finger in the usual way. So they’re the main controls for finding your way around the preview on the right of the Print Page. Now let’s look at some of the other print settings. We’ve already seen we’ve got the big Print button there at the top left. The number of copies is straightforward enough. You can type in or use the tumblers to choose the number of copies that you need. And then very importantly here is your choice of printer. Now one of your printing options will be set as the default. Mine is currently set to default to using One Note. A lot of the work I do goes straight into One Note for me to work on training course outlines and that sort of thing. But very often I would have the default set to a physical printer and, in fact, most people would have their default set to a physical printer. Now with the choice of send to One Note 2013, I also have an option here for Printer Properties, and what I see when I click on Printer Properties does depend on the choice that’s made here. So with the choice send to One Note 2013, click on Printer Properties and I get a little dialog Send to One Note 2013 document properties and that gives me, in this case, a very small list of options

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Learn Word 2013 and the main option really is to choose an orientation of portrait which is previewed there or landscape which is previewed there. There are some advanced options. I’m not going to look into those now. They’re to do with things like resolution for graphics and so on. But as you can see, if you send a document to One Note, you have a very limited range of options available. So let’s cancel that and look at my other printer options. So let me click on this drop down. My options are I can print to Fax, fax machine. Note the status, ready. I can print to a physical printer, HP psc 2500 Series. Its status is ready as well. I can print to a Microsoft XPS Document Writer, ready. Or as we saw just now send to One Note. Now at the bottom of the list here, I also have an option to print to a file and if the printer that I want to use isn’t listed, perhaps it’s a Network Printer or maybe one I’ve just plugged into my PC, I can click on Add Printer and go through the process of adding that printer to the available list. So on this occasion, I’m going to choose the physical printer, the HP psc 2500 Series printer, select there, and that’s the one I’m going to use for this print. Now let’s take a look at the Printer Properties for that printer. So click on Printer Properties and, of course, I get a much more comprehensive dialog when I’m looking at a physical printer. Now unless you’ve got exactly the same model of printer as mine, you will see a different dialog to this. It almost certainly has a number of tabs. The number of tabs and what each of them are will vary. So in my case the first tab is Advanced will enable me to set things like the copy count, image color management settings, some of the printer features, and then I have paper and quality settings so I could choose for instance the paper size, A4 currently selected. I could, for instance, go for letter size. And then I have other settings here: effects, finishing color, the one’s you get will depend on the specific physical printer that you’re using. Once I’ve made the selections that I want to make, click on OK and again I’m ready now to print, but before I do let’s just take a look at these other settings. So let’s start with the top setting, print all pages by default; that means the whole thing. If I click on the drop down here, I have an option of just printing the current page or I can do custom print. Now with custom print if I click on that, then I can actually make a list of or specify a range of pages that I wanted to print. So I could, for instance, print pages two to four like that. Let’s stick with print all pages for the moment. Now the next option is also a useful and important

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Learn Word 2013 one. It’s currently set to print one sided. My particular printer, the one I’ve got selected here doesn’t do two sided printing as such, but you can do two sided printing by basically asking Word to print all the odd pages first and then you physically turn the paper over and reload it into the printer and it will print the even numbered pages on the other side. So if I wanted to do that the option I’d choose here, it currently says print one sided. If I click on the drop down arrow the option I’ve got here is manually print on both sides, reload paper when prompted to print the second side. Now if you’re using a printer that automatically does two sided printing, then you will get the options appropriate to that or indeed if your printer requires some different process to do double sided printing you’ll get the options there. So these do depend on the selected printer. But if I wanted to do double sided printed on mine, I can do it but it does involve a manual reload. On this occasion, I’m going to stick with print one sided. If you’re printing several copies of a document, then you have a choice. Let’s suppose I wanted to print five copies of a six page document. Do I want all of the page 1’s printed, then all of the page 2’s, then all of the page 3’s or would I like 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 for the first set, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, for the second set and so on? The second option there, the collated option is the one that’s selected here. So if I printed five copies of the current six page document, I’d get five copies one after the other. If I wanted all of the page 1’s together, etc. I’d go for the un-collated option. But I’m going to stick with collated for now. The next option is a very straightforward one. Do I want portrait or do I want landscape? I’m going to stick with portrait. Paper size, pretty straightforward. There’s usually a long list, exactly what list you see will depend on your locale. But you can also go in, More paper sizes, and select custom size for the paper. Of course, whether your printer can handle custom size paper is another matter all together. So you need to be a little bit careful about that. But depending on the capabilities of your printer, you can choose the appropriate paper size, and then you can also go through and set or reset the margins to use. Now I’m going to talk about margins a little bit more later on, but basically this defaults to normal margins. If I selected narrow margins, for instance, you can see from the little thumbnail there how much effect that has if I went for narrow margins. If you look at the preview on the right, you can see what a

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Learn Word 2013 difference that makes to the pages. In fact, it reduces it from a six page document to a five page document. Let me go back to normal again. And the final option down here, one page per sheet. If you have small pages, large paper, or you want to do some kind of rough preview, printed preview of a document, you can actually put more than one page on a sheet and you can also use scaling to the paper size. So you can actually say that you want the pages, the printed pages scaled to fit a certain number on to the size of paper you’ve selected and so on. So they’re the basic options that you have and right below those you have this one, Page Setup. If you click on Page Setup that brings up a Page Setup dialog that includes some of the settings that we’ve already seen and some others as well. So for instance, depending on your printer, you may have more than one paper tray. You may say have headed paper, you may have different sized paper and there are many options here. Many of them do depend on the specific printer that you’ve got and some of them related to margins and to layout, to do with headers, footers, and so on; we’re going to come back to later on in the course. But you need to be aware of this Page Setup dialog because it’s a very good place to access some of the setup options that we’ve seen so far and some of the ones that we’re going to see a little bit later on. So let’s just look at a couple of other things that are really quite useful to know about. Let me go back into my document and one of the things to point out is that the Print button is one of the standard ones on the Quick Access Toolbar. So if you want a very quick way of accessing Print, then there is a Quick Print option here. Click on Quick Print; that is now enabled here. You can see the button here and if I just do Quick Print, it goes to my physical printer and I just print that and away I go to print a document. It’s as simple as that. The last thing I want to show you is really outside the scope of this course but just so that you’re aware of it because it’s something I’m sure you’ll want to investigate yourself and we will cover it a little bit more when we come back to mail merge later on in the course. There are special print facilities for envelopes and labels and the like. And if you have an address such as this one, you go to the Mailings tab in the group on the left, the Create Group, there’s a Create Labels option and there’s a Create Envelopes option. Create Envelopes and if you click on Create

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Learn Word 2013 Envelopes here with this fictitious address it interprets the address as an address, does an envelope preview. You can type in a return address which would appear in the top left hand corner of the envelope and you can specifically print an envelope. Now if your printer can handle envelopes and you have helpful features here like the feed direction and so on, then you can basically print envelopes. And obviously that’s an important part of a function such as mail merge. Then you have other options. You have e-postage options and so on. They’re outside the scope of this course but it’s good to be aware of those both for printing envelopes and for printing labels. So that’s it on the basics of printing. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Page Layout, Sections and Margins Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, I’m going to look at page layout in a little bit more detail than we have so far and I’m going to start by introducing Sections. Now although I haven’t mentioned it before, the layout of the documents that we’ve been creating so far in Word 2013 has been very uniform. We’ve had a single column of text on a page and we’ve had no headers, no footers, we haven’t even shown the page number on the page. Now when we get to longer documents in particular, but in fact this can apply in any length of document, there may be a need to break the document into what are called Sections. And the key thing about sections is that sections can have different layouts. So let’s take this document. It’s the six page document that we’ve been using recently. If I wanted to split this into two sections, I could give section one a different layout to section two. For example section one could have one column on a page and section two could have three columns on a page. So first of all, let’s see how to break this document into sections. I’m going to do it a little bit artificially to begin with. So I’m going to choose at any point in the document, say that point there, and then I’m going to go to the Page Layout tab and I’m going to click on Breaks and I’m going to choose a Section Break. Now when you’re putting a section break into a document, you need to decide what sort of section break it is.

If you think of a typical novel, the right hand pages are always odd

numbered, the left hand pages are always even numbered, and very often a new chapter, which we might think of as a new section, will begin on an odd numbered page, a right hand page. So if you’re section break was really a sort of chapter break and you thought I really want this to start on a right hand page, you would put in an odd page section break. And what Word will do for you is to make sure that the next section starts on an odd numbered page. Now conversely, there are situations I have seen books where they always start a new section on an even numbered page, a left hand page. So you could specify even page section break. If you don’t care and you just want it to be the next page you can just choose next page. If, in fact, you don’t even necessarily want a new page, you can choose a continuous section break and provided

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Learn Word 2013 there’s space the new section will start on the same page. Now on this occasion, I’m going to choose an odd page section break. So I click on odd page section break, click there, and note that where I had the cursor, the beginning of the word Video, that’s now starting a new page. Now note the cursor is there and look at the status bar. I’m in section two and its page 5 of 7. If I go up to the paragraph before where I’ve put the section break it says section one, page 3 of 7. So there is no longer a page four. What it’s done is its finished section one on page three which is a right page, an odd numbered page, and then it’s gone to page five for the beginning of section two. So putting in a section break is as simple as that. So let’s now look at some of the things that we can do once we’ve broken the document into sections. I’ve still got the cursor in section two, in the paragraph beginning Video. If I go to the Page Setup Group on the Page Layout tab, one of the options there is Orientation. Let me click on Orientation and note I’m going to change from portrait to landscape, watch what happens. It only affects the section that the cursors in. So what I’ve now got is a document in which section one is portrait and section two is landscape. Now I can apply it to the whole document. I’ll come back to that in a little while. But it suits me at the moment to have section two landscape and section one portrait. Now let’s look at the columns option within the Page Setup Group on the Page Layout tab. Let’s click on Columns and let’s change to three columns, watch what happens. Again, section one stays one column, portrait, but if I scroll down into section two, I can see that the pages in section two are now landscape pages with three columns per page. Now let’s look at one of the other options here, Margins. Now I could do exactly the same as I’ve done so far with margins. I could set to narrow. We looked at that earlier on. I could look at moderate, wide, and so on. But I want to do this a different way. So what I’m going to do is I’m going to go back to the section one part of the document and instead of using the Margins button here, I’m going to go into the Page Setup dialog launcher. Now with margins selected, note I can change the margins. I can change the orientation, but right at the bottom, Apply to this section. By default these changes apply to a section. If I wanted to change the margins, let’s suppose I wanted to have much fatter margins. So I’m going to increase the left margin to 2

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Learn Word 2013 inches and the right margin to 2 inches. If I just click on OK, it’ll apply just to this section, section one. But I could say from this point forward or to the whole document. So as I said just now, if I want to apply it to the whole document, if I click on whole document and then click on OK, okay the margins in section one are much fatter now. If I go down to section two, the landscape section, note that in the landscape section I’ve got the fatter margins as well. So the changes have been applied to the whole document by making that selection in the Page Setup dialog. So that’s straightforward enough. Let me go back into section one again and now I’m going to go into that dialog again and I’m going to put the left and right margins down to just half an inch. And this time with these narrower margins, I’m going to leave this set at “Applies to this section”, click on OK. Now in section one, of course, the left and right margins are relatively narrow, much narrower than they were. But if I go back down to section two, they’re set at the wide setting because when I reset, when I went back to half an inch, I had this section selected, not whole document. So they keep the setting that I gave them before. So that is fundamentally how you setup page layout differently by section or for the whole document. The other options here include size, paper size. There are the default ones like letter and A4, but you can also go into custom paper sizes. As I mentioned earlier on, be a little bit careful if you’re producing printed documents in terms of custom paper sizes because if you can’t actually print that size, then that may cause you a problem. Having said that, increasingly people are producing documents that are rarely if ever actually physically printed. So, of course, if you’re only transferring something electronically, then paper size doesn’t have the same constraints. And also when you’re dealing with margins, we’ve effectively setup a custom margin here earlier on in this section. But with custom margins in general, as with many of the options here, it takes you into this Page Setup dialog where you can change things like portrait/landscape, you can setup a gutter to allow for additional width for binding and so on, and then you can go into paper sizes, layouts, etc. So you now know how to divide a document into section and how to change page layout features such as paper size, orientation, margins, number of columns either for individual sections or for the whole document.

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Learn Word 2013 In the next section we’re going to look at another important aspect of page layout and that’s headers, footers, and page numbers. So please join me for that.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Headers, Footers and Page Numbers Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to take a look at showing page numbers on the pages of a document and at inserting a header and a footer. So we’re going to use the Video provides document again and this one still has a section break in it. It runs to eight pages, allowing for the section break. And first of all, let me show you how you would include page numbers. So to insert page numbers, we go to the Header and Footer Group on the Insert tab, the third button down there is Page Number, click on Page Number. You can see, first of all, that we have a choice of positions. We can put it at the top of the page, at the bottom of the page, or indeed in one of the page margins. We can also say that we want the page number put in the current position. So you can insert that pretty much anywhere on a page and whichever option you hover over, you’ll see a representation of how it will look in the long list on the left. Now you can’t quite see all of that on the screen at the moment. I’m going to use the top of page option on this occasion and as you can see I can have a plain number and it is in the first option on the left at the top, middle at the top, right at the top and I can also have it with what’s called an Accent Bar just to give it a little bit more of a sort of a nice look and feel to it. Let’s see what the accent bar looks like. And what it’s actually done is to create a header and within that header a note it says Header section 1, it says 1 which is the page number and then it’s got the word Page. Now if I go down to the second page in my document, you’ll see that says 2 Page. Note that the way that it’s laid out is exactly the same; 3 Page, go down, and then it carries on into the second section, Header section 2. So that’s a very straightforward way of putting a page number on a page. Let me just undo that now and now let me try that straightforward option, Insert, Page Number, top of page, the very first option. Again, it does the same thing, it puts the header in but the header only includes the page number and nothing else. Now I could’ve achieved the same effect by choosing initially Insert, Header and that would’ve inserted a header for me and I could’ve then inserted within the header the page number. When you are in the header, when you’re working on or editing the header, which is what I’m doing now, I can see under header and footer tools that I have a context sensitive Design tab with a

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Learn Word 2013 number of options of things that I can do within the header. When I finished working on the header, I have a button over here on the right, Close header and footer which will close that down for me and return me to working on the main document. So if I click on Close header and footer now, the contextual tab disappears and I’m back in the main document again. Notice that I can see the page number here. It’s grayed out. I’m not able to edit it at the moment. If I go up with the arrow from the text, I don’t go into the header. To go into the header, there’s a couple of ways of doing it. One way is literally just to double click on the header that’s already there and it takes you back into a situation where you’re editing the header again. Now there’s actually a lot of flexibility in terms of what you can include in a header or footer in a document in Word 2013. What we have here is just the page number and as we’ve seen that is automatically updated in subsequent pages. If I wanted to make that a little bit fancier, there’s a number of ways of doing it. For instance, if I did want the word Page with it, as we saw just now, I could instead of using that automatic approach of putting in that specific header option for me, I can actually type P-A-G-E, space and then note as I go down to the other pages they all say Page. Now the word Page obviously doesn’t vary but the page number does. So you can pretty much adapt that to anything that you like. Also, if I wanted something else in the heading as well; supposing I wanted today’s date in there. Let me just press the Tab key and that Tab key takes me to the middle of the header there. I could either choose one of these options such as inserting the date and time or I can insert what are called Quick Parts. And if you click on the drop down for Quick Parts these include a number of things such as automatic text, properties of the document, specific fields of which there are many, and various building blocks and we’re going to look at some of these things later on in the course but let’s just look at document property now. Let’s suppose we just want to put in there the author. So click in author and there my name has appeared. And again, that will be on every page. Now using that kind of approach, you can make as sophisticated a header as you like. And as you’ve already seen we know how to do things like set tabs and change the formatting so you could make the font different, the font sizes different. You could color the characters in the header and so on; so many, many options.

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Learn Word 2013 So let’s suppose that I wanted a footer as well. I can close the header and footer here and then do Insert, Footer, but actually if I just click here, Go to footer, even though a footer doesn’t already exist, then Word 2013 will automatically create a footer for me. So click on Go to footer. There it is. Of course, it’s completely empty. Let’s suppose I want to put the date and time in the footer and I’m going to put it in the middle of the page. So I press the Tab key first to take me to the middle and then I’m just going to click on this Date and Time button in the Insert Group on the Design tab, and I’m given a choice of available formats. Let’s say I’m going to choose that one, click on OK. Note update automatically is checked. That means that this is not going to be a date that’s fixed at the date that I set this footer up. So it won’t always say Monday, January 7th. It will be updated. So whenever anybody looks at this, it will show the current date. Obviously this would only be in an online version, not a printed one. It can’t update the printed ones. But click on OK and there we are. I’ve got a footer with the date in it. So I’ve inserted the date into the footer. That wasn’t quite what I wanted because I did say date and time. If I need to change something, there are a few options. One of them is to literally just delete what I’ve done and start again. But also if you right click on this particular item in the footer or any item in the footer, you have an option of Edit field and in this case the field is date which includes date and time, of course. And then the field properties, the second column here, gives me an option of date format. Now the date format, I chose with this one which only shows the date. There are other standard formats that include date and time, such as this one. I’m going to use that. And you can in fact create your own using the sort of coding system here. I’m not going to go into that coding system now, but it’s pretty straightforward to work out if you want to put together your own date and time format. Having chosen that, I click on OK and I’ve now got the date and time shown in the footer. Now as before note that when I finished editing the header and footer I can just click on Close header and footer and I’m back to the document. Let’s take a look at the document again. There’s Page 1, Toby, footer has got the date and time in it, Page 2, Toby, footer has got the date and time in it and so on. It’s quite usual, particularly where you have an uneven header or an uneven footer to have different headers and footers on odd and even pages so that for instance the page number appears on the outside of each page or the inside if you think of it in terms of a

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Learn Word 2013 bound book. This can be less important with documents that are not meant to be read as books, they’re really just continuous scrolling documents. But if you’re in that situation if you double click somewhere in the header one of the options in the Options Group is different, odd, and even pages; if you click on different, odd, and even pages. Now in the odd header page, I’ve got the header that I had before, Page 1, Toby. But on an even page, I now have no header at all. So I would actually start there to build a different one. Now I could make it the opposite of the odd page header. So I could put Toby in the middle and the page number on the right or I could make it completely different all together if I wanted to. Notice that also when I did that, I’ve also got no footer on an even numbered page either. So again I can start from scratch or I can basically build the same kind of thing. Carrying on further down the page, if I go into the second section, I’ve got odd page header section 2 and even page header section 2, that’s blank as well now. But there’s also something over here and that is it says Same as previous. When I inserted the header and footer into this document, originally I did that in section one and by default the subsequent sections, section 2 and beyond, pick up the same header and footer. And when I then specified that, the odd and even headers and footers will be different from each other, I then finished up with those replicated throughout the document. So I’ve effectively got four different things. I’ve got the odd page header, the even page header, the odd page footer, and the even page footer. Four of those and they’re used throughout the document. Now I can have different headers/footers, odd and even page, in each of the sections in the document. By default each section picks up those from the previous one. So looking here at the end of section 1 on page 3, we’ve got odd page footer section 1 and then as we move into section 2, we’ve got the odd page header section 2 and it picks up “Same as previous”. So the odd page header in section 2 will be the same as the previous. It’ll be the same as the odd page header in section 1. Now let’s suppose that I wanted to make the footers different. So let me just scroll down here a little way. I’m going to go down to the odd page footer for section 2 and instead of having Same as previous, if I click on Same as previous, you notice that in the Navigation Group on the Design tab in the header and footer tools this button is highlighted, it’s depressed. If I uncheck it, that Same as previous has gone and now the odd page footer in section 2 is independent of the odd page footer in section 1. So I could, for instance, just delete that all together and put my

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Learn Word 2013 own new section 2 odd page footer. Let’s put something different in there all together. Let’s put in one of the other fields. One field we’ve seen already is the page number so why don’t we just put a page number in there instead. And now page 5 which is an odd page in section 2 has got a footer of 5 for the page number. I go right back up to the top of the document to page 1 which is an odd page in section 1; if I look at its footer it, of course, has still got the date and time footer. So I can remove the linkage which means that the headers and footers between the sections can be made independent in that way. So now I’d like to show you one other thing in relation to headers and footers, and in order to do that I’m going to need to do something that we haven’t covered so far. If you go to the Insert tab, one of the options in the Pages Group on the left there is Cover Page and you can insert a cover page for a document in a very straightforward way. So let’s just click on Cover Page. I’m going to put in a cover page with a nice fairly straightforward first page like that. When you put in a cover page or perhaps a section header or something like that, you’re very often in the situation that you don’t want headers and footers on the cover page. So in this particular case, for example, if we look at the first page there; I haven’t filled in this date and company name and all the other things, but you notice that when I put the cover page in, there is no header or footer on that first page. If I go to the header here of page one and just select it in the usual way, double click on it, notice what’s happened here in the Options Group. What Word 2013 has automatically done is to declare that the first page is different. The first page has no header or footer. Now if I hadn’t done that by means of inserting a cover page, if I’d just manually put another page at the beginning or indeed if I just didn’t want a header and footer on this first page, I would achieve that by checking that box to say that the first page is different. Just one other thing to point out to you about headers and footers; generally speaking to insert a header and footer, we pretty much saw this earlier on, but just to go over that again quickly. On the Insert tab in the Header and Footer Group, there are options to insert a header, insert a footer, and insert page numbers. If you look at the header option, right down the bottom here of the list is Remove header and that’s the option you use to remove a header either from a section or from a whole document. You have exactly the equivalent thing for a footer. And what I’ve done is I’ve removed all the headers and footers from the document we’ve been working on. I’ve called

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Learn Word 2013 it example-09 and that’ll be in the set of example documents that’s available to you. So that’s example-09. You can either use example-09 for the next exercise or you can use a document of your own, but what I’d like you to do with example-09 to produce example-10, and my version of example-10 is available in the documents as well. First of all, I want you to make it into a landscape document. You only need one section. You don’t need to experiment with multiple sections. But I would then like you to make it two column and with a header and a footer. And quite straightforward, in the footer I’d just like you to put the page number and in the header I’d like you to put just the date. And in both cases, the header and the footer, I’d like them to be centered. Now you’re going to need to apply a little bit of trickery here so I’m just going to give you a bit of a clue. I’ve got that same document open. It’s still portrait here. I’ve put the date in the header and if you look its left positioned here. Watch what happens if I put the cursor to the left, press the Tab key, then it goes to the middle of the page. It’s centered. There is a center tab set by default here. Now this is with a portrait page. If I were to change this to landscape, I would need to make sure that that tab, the one you can see the symbol for just there, is centered on the landscape page as well. And when you’ve changed this document to landscape whether or not you’ve done two columns, you’re going to need to make sure that the tab is correct. So you click in the line where your header is, you check the tab, you make sure it’s in the center when the page is in landscape mode. So that’s an extra little challenge for you there using the tabs as well. So that’s the exercise to do and I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 18 – Templates, Themes and Styles Video: Using Templates Toby: Hello and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to take a look at Templates. I’ve mentioned them a couple of times before. We’re going to look into them in more detail in this section and in particular, we’re going to look at some of the new and improved facilities in Word 2013. So, let’s get started. Now almost everybody I know that works with Microsoft Word a lot, whatever sort of job they do, tends to rarely start from scratch, completely from scratch with a new document. If they’re writing a letter, preparing a report, doing a proposal or a presentation, or even when they’re doing things at home like writing letters to family, friends, or to deal with issues at home. It’s very often the case that you start with a document you prepared before and maybe just change one or two things or maybe make some major changes to the document. But you usually use something as a starting point or you use a document to give you some structure to the one you’re trying to prepare, and in loose terms that’s what a template does. It gives you a starting point, a structure, an overall shape for a document. And in fact as successive versions of Microsoft Office have developed further and further nowadays, templates also give you very sophisticated design and style elements as well. Now in order to demonstrate this, what we’re going to do is we’re going to create a new document again but this time we’re going to use one of the online templates that is provided with Word 2013. So we go File, New, and what we have here apart from blank document which we’ve started with before and this welcome to Word helpful link here is a whole list of available templates. Now this is by no means an exhaustive list. This is just a sample of what’s available. If you wanted to Search for a template, you can use this search facility here to just see if there is a template to deal with the specific item that you want. So for example, if I wanted to make a birthday poster for one of my colleagues at work, I could look for a birthday poster. So I could just type in the term Birthday, click on the magnifier to search, and it would find me all of the available templates on Office.com related to birthdays. There are some other suggested searches

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Learn Word 2013 here such as letters, resume, fax, labels. I’ll let you try those yourself. There are literally thousands of templates available nowadays. But I’m going to use the one that you can see right down here in the bottom right hand corner, Birthday Poster. Let’s try and make a birthday poster for one of my colleagues starting with this template. So first of all, we click on the template once. That actually opens up a description of the template and there is a system by which people rate the available templates.

If you’re

considering using one of the ones available from Office.com where there may be many, many templates that might meet your requirements, rather than go to the trouble of downloading them all from Office.com, if you just click once you get this outline, this overview of the template, give you a slightly bigger view of what it looks like, and then the rating will usually tell you either how good the results are or how easy it is to use. This particular template has only got a three star rating which isn’t particularly good. But let’s go with this anyway because I just want to show you the principle of how to use this kind of template. You can also see here how a big a file it is. It’s a 55 KB file so that’s not very big. Use this birthday celebration poster template to spread the word about a work party or personal event. Now once you’ve selected the template that you’re going to use, you click Create and it downloads the template and creates a basically a poster for you with some information that you need to fill in yourself. Now the information that you need to fill in yourself is marked, generally speaking, with these square brackets, these placeholder brackets, and if I click on one of those items like Name here, you see clicking in there selects the whole of the placeholder including the square brackets. Now one advantage of using this approach within templates is that if I put the person’s name in here note that further down the name appears again and once I’ve typed the name in, in the placeholder further up it’ll appear here as well. There are a few of these. There’s the date and time, there’s the location. Let me just fill in the first one to show you basically how it works. So with that one selected, let’s suppose then the person is Sue Adams. Now I’ve typed that using the normal case, a capital S, capital A. Once I’ve left that, so I’ve now gone down to the age field. If I just take a quick look further down the document, you’ll see that Sue’s name in the way that I typed it has appeared further down in the poster. So now I’ll put Sue’s age in. I’ll be

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Learn Word 2013 a little bit generous, and then I’ll carry on and do the other fields. I’ll rejoin you in just a moment. So I’ve filled in the rest of the information I need to and I have my poster. Let’s just go to the View tab and click on the one page in view just so I can see the whole thing. There it is and that’s fine. It’s got an email address to respond to and the details that people need in order to attend the celebration of Sue’s birthday. Now I’ve saved this particular celebration poster and we’re going to use it again in the next section. But for now I’d like to leave you with an exercise to do pretty much the same sort of thing that we’ve just done but this time I would like you to create a business flyer. Now if we go File, New, then you’re going to see probably on the list of new templates here one down here, Color block flyer. If you don’t find it, if you Search on Office.com, you should be able to find that okay. And basically I want you to go in there, if you have a business then put your own business details in. I’m going to click on it now, Color block flyer, to see what it looks like, 222 KB, click on Create. So this is a very straightforward exercise to do. All I want you to do is to use that template and create a flyer. Everything in this template apart from the physical color blocks themselves is text that you need to enter into the appropriate placeholders. You may find that it’s difficult for you to get all the information you need into that available space. So that may be a little challenge for you as well. My answer is example-11 and I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Using Themes and Styles Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at themes and styles and we’re going to start by looking again at the poster we created in an earlier section to celebrate a member of staff’s birthday. Now whether or not you like the design of this particular document, the person that has designed it has put together a combination of fonts, font sizes, colors, shapes, and so on to produce what that person considers to be an attractive document, an attractive poster. You may or may not like it. Maybe if you’d set about producing such a poster, yours would look quite different from this. But one thing about it is that the person who’s made it has tried to use a coordinated set of design elements. Now one of the features of Word 2013 is that to a large extent, we can keep separate the content of a document and if you like the design of the document, the visual impact of the document. Now, of course, you can’t completely separate those two things, but the way that this is done and the way it is in Word 2013 is to use themes and at any time this document, this particular poster will have a theme applied to it and we can completely change the overall appearance of the document by applying a different theme to it. And the first thing we’re going to look at in this section is how we can change the theme that’s applied to a document. Now in this section, we’re going to rely very heavily on live preview. So I want you to just make sure that you’ve got live preview switched on. If for any reason you don’t see what I’m showing you in this section on your own copy of Word 2013 go into the Word Options, the General Page, and just make sure that that box there, Enable live preview, is ticked. If it isn’t tick it, click OK, and then you’ll be able to see what I’m doing on your copy of Word 2013. So select the Design tab and then on the Design tab, there’s a whole group called Document Formatting and on the left of that there is a drop down that’s called Themes. And if you click on the arrow at the bottom there, you see a gallery of themes. Each of the themes has a name. So if you look at the gallery, each of them has a thumbnail. You have Office, Facet, Integral, Ion, and so on. And there are many others available actually. You can find other themes from elsewhere.

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Learn Word 2013 So what’s a theme? Well a theme is a sort of controller of your design. It’s really a coordinated set of elements. It combines fonts, color schemes, special effects, shading, shadow, all kinds of things into one consistent theme really. And this particular poster that we’ve been looking at has a theme. Now if I want to see what one of the other themes would look like, then all I’ve got to do provided I’ve got live preview enabled is to hover over that theme. So let’s start with Office. Notice what a difference that makes, the font changes, the font sizes change, the color schemes change. Now let’s look at the next theme which is Facet, then Integral, then Ion. Notice how the changes in the font in some cases actually make it impossible to read all of the content which just emphasizes the fact that although to a large extent the theme is an independent aspect of a document it is inextricably linked with the content as well. You can’t guarantee that whatever theme you apply to a document it will still work; you’ll still be able to read all the content for example. Now apart from the 20 or so themes that you can see in front of you, there’s a little scroll bar on the right here which gives you access to one more. But you can immediately see what the affect of changing themes is. So let me just apply a different theme here. Let’s try, let’s try that one, Celestial. Once I click on that, then that theme is now the theme that’s applied to the current document. And one thing to note if I again click on the arrow under the Themes button there, the theme that’s currently applied is highlighted and if you look at the options at the bottom there, you can always reset to the theme from the Birthday poster template. So Word 2013 knows which template it used. The template came with a theme. The theme it came with may or may not be in the gallery on your PC, but if you want to reset to that theme at any time, you can. You can browse for themes. Themes are available online to download but also you can create your own, which brings me to the final point here, Save current theme. You can actually modify a theme. You can take one from a template or from your own document. You can make changes to the theme. You maybe don’t like one of these colors. You could actually change it to a different color, and you could save that as your own theme. Now creating your own themes, making changes to themes is outside the scope of this course but it is pretty straightforward. You need to understand styles as well, which we’re coming to a little bit later on in this section. But themes are very flexible, very powerful and you can do quite a lot with them and certainly if you

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Learn Word 2013 have your own clear ideas on the sort of design that you like, you will find that making your own themes, modifying the provided themes is something that gives you a lot of flexibility and a lot of power in your designs. So let’s stick with the Celestial theme for now and let’s look at a different document and look at styles as well. Now earlier in the course, we looked at this multilevel list and the important thing here is that the multilevel list gives us a structure. We have top level items in the list such as Introduction, Bulleted List, Numbered List, Multilevel List and then within each of those top level items, we have another level, What is a list?, When would I use lists?, and so on. Now that is just one way of going about putting together a structured document and it’s not a particularly suitable way if you’re dealing with say a very long document, hundreds of pages. And what you really want is to divide the document into pieces and each piece will correspond to one of these headings. So we might have a piece with a heading of Introduction, the next piece would have a heading of Bulleted Lists, and the piece that’s got a heading of Introduction would have other pieces within it with lower level headings, What is a list? When would I use lists? What types are there? And then within each of those pieces we might well have an answer to the question. So, what is a list? We might have an explanation there of what a list is. Now I’m going to turn this small document into a structured document that uses headings instead of a multilevel list. And the way I’m going to do it is to use what are called Styles. Now let’s start right at the top. Let’s start with Introduction. If I wanted to turn that into a top level heading, I would use Heading 1 and to apply a style the most straightforward way to do it if you look at the Home tab, there is a Styles Group. I can literally just click on Heading 1 and that is now a Heading 1 style or to be more precise it’s a paragraph in the Heading 1 style. Let me go to the next one, What is a list? I’m going to make that a Heading 2 style. I’m going to do the same for that and the same for the others. So having changed this from a multilevel list to a set of headings, the other important factor here is that normally within a document like this, I would have some regular text. So let me just take this particular Heading 2. What types are there?, press the Enter key, and note after I press the Enter key, Word 2013 automatically says that the paragraph I’m working on now has what’s called the Normal style. This is if you like the main content, the standard content within a document is usually defined as being in the normal style.

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Learn Word 2013 So the heading there was “What types are there?” Let me say what types of list there are. Now notice how the appearance of that paragraph is very different, the normal style is very often black, smaller text with no particular emphasis; nothing really fancy about that style at all. But what we have now is a document in which we’ve used three different styles: Heading 1, Heading 2, and Normal. Now let’s go back to the Design tab and click on that arrow under Themes. Bring up the themes gallery again and note what happens if I hover over the Office theme in the gallery. In fact, nothing happens at all. Watch what happens if I hover over a Facet. Now if I hover over Facet, I get a preview of how my document will look using the Facet theme. You should’ve noticed even though you can’t see all of the content of the document, you can see a part of a paragraph in each of the three different styles. You can see how the colors change, the font changes, the font size changes. Again, let’s try Integral, significant changes as well; Ion and so on. And if I preview, the effect on my document of each of those you can see what a big difference each of them makes in my document. Now as we’ll see later on, the style doesn’t just extend to text. It can extend to many other things as well, including things like shading and the way for instance that tables work, but more on that later on. What I’m really showing you here is the basic principle of themes and styles. So having applied a theme in this case, if we click back on the gallery, we can see which one’s applied; it’s the Dividend theme down there because it’s highlighted. Let’s go back now and apply the Facet theme, and you can see how straightforward it is to apply a theme by using styles within a document. Now when I turned our original multilevel list into a document with headings using those three styles I already knew which styles I was going to use. Depending on the theme that you have in force, there may be literally dozens and dozens of styles available to you and you may not necessarily know which styles you want to apply in a particular situation. Now the theme we have in force here is the Facet theme and to see the styles that go with that theme, we literally go back to the Home tab and then in the Styles Group where we picked Normal Heading 1 and Heading 2 before, if there is a drop down arrow here, a More arrow, and if I click on that it gives

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Learn Word 2013 me a gallery of available styles. Now this, the gallery you see here is not the full set. I’ll come to the full set in a moment. But you do have a preview facility. So if I thought okay, well Heading 1 looks fine. What about trying one of the different styles for that first line in my document which just says Introduction at the moment? What about, how would it look with the Title style? And we can see now how Title would look or maybe how that style would look or that style. And we can look at a number of different styles and decide which one we want to use in any particular situation. One other useful thing to know about in relation to styles is if you’ve got a particular line; say the first one here which has Heading 1 style, if you click on that drop down, then one of the options there is Clear formatting. If you’ve done some work on a particular paragraph, say, and you want to just clear everything you’ve done, remove the style and any changes you’ve made to the style. If you click on Clear formatting, it puts it back to the normal style and then you can start again or maybe even leave it as in the normal style. Now when I spoke about themes earlier on, I pointed out that you can customize themes, you can create your own, you can change the existing ones, and save them with new names, etc. You can do just the same with styles. You can create your own styles. If you click on that drop down there again at the bottom right hand corner of the Styles Group you have a Create a style option. The other thing to point out, although we started with a multilevel list and turned these into items that are not list items. If I was to take that line there, “There are three types of list”, and put it back into a bulleted list again, notice that that is a style in itself. If I go back into the style gallery, I will see that what I’ve actually done is to apply a style to that item. So list themselves are style as are many other things. The number of available styles in a particular situation is a very, very long list for most of the themes that are provided with Word 2013. So that just leaves me with an exercise to set you to do. You should have your equivalent of this list, five rooms in your house or apartment or flat or whatever you live in, and with each of those rooms, three of the largest items in the room. There are five for my house and in each case, the three largest items in each of the rooms. I want you to basically turn your equivalent of that list or example-07, if you don’t have an equivalent, into a document with styles instead of using a

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Learn Word 2013 multilevel list like this. I want you to really do two other things as well. One of them is I want you to put at least a paragraph of normal text about each of the objects. Now I’m going to put dummy text in mine, so I’m not going to give a full description of the wardrobe in my master bedroom but I’ll put some dummy text in instead. And then also what I want you to do is I don’t want you to make Master Bedroom a Heading 1 or Lounge a Heading 1 or Kitchen a Heading 1. I want those to be Heading 2’s. So the items of furniture will be Heading 3’s. And I want you to divide the whole thing into upstairs and downstairs or ground floor and upstairs or floor one and floor zero, however you name them, assuming you do live on two levels. If you live on one level just divide the apartment or flat into two parts and they will be your Heading level 1’s, those two categories. So my answer to that question is example-12. That’s it for this section. I’ll see you in the next one.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 19 – PDF in Word Video: Opening and Editing PDFs Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at one of the brand new features of Word which has come in, in Word 2013 and although in some ways it’s quite a small feature, it’s actually a very significant one. For a very long time the PDF format, the Portable Document Format derived by Adobe has been the standard format for the interchange of electronic documents. And although the various components of the Microsoft Office Suite have been able to generate PDF documents for a few versions now, it’s generally not been possible to open or edit PDF documents in Word or for that matter any of the other components of the Office Suite. Well, with Word 2013, you can open and edit PDF documents and I’m going to give you quick demonstration of that now. Now what I’ve done in order to demonstrate this to you is I’ve actually downloaded a PDF from the Microsoft website. It’s a Microsoft document about how to deploy Office 2013. It’s in my Downloads folder. So if I click on File, got into Backstage View, and then with Open, go to My Computer, and then Browse, go to my Downloads folder, and there it is, Deployment guide for Office 2013.pdf and double click to open it. Now what happens is that you get a message here warning you, Word will now convert your PDF to an editable Word document. This may take a while. Now I’m sorry you can’t see all of this message on the screen here because of the resolution of the screen, but I’ll just move this message over so we can read the rest of it. The resulting Word document will be optimized to allow you to edit the text so it might not look exactly like the original PDF, especially if the original file contained lots of graphics. Now I can suppress that message. I don’t need to see that message again and I’ll just explain it to you. Although basically opening and editing PDFs in Word 2013 works absolutely fine, there are some features in the way that PDF documents are formatted, particularly in relation to graphics that are either not supported in Word or work a little bit differently in Word. So if you’ve got a PDF document and as I say particularly if it’s got a lot of graphics and you open that document, it may not look exactly the same in Word as it does in the equivalent Adobe software; Adobe

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Learn Word 2013 Acrobat or Adobe Reader. But let’s click this one anyway and give it a moment to do the conversion. Now if you’re going to try this yourself, you’ll be downloading a PDF perhaps from the internet. You need to be careful about where you get it from because PDFs can carry malware, viruses, etc. So I’ve downloaded this from the Microsoft website which I basically trust. But even then because of the security setup, I’ve got in Word which I’m going to talk to you about quite a bit later on in the course, I’ve got this document open in Protected View which basically means that Word enforces a level of protection and warning on this document to make sure that it doesn’t damage my computer system in any way. Now before I start editing, I need to make a conscious decision and tell Word of that decision; that I’m prepared to edit this document. So there’s a button up here, Enable editing. I’m going to click that. That warning about protected view goes away and I’ll be able to edit the document. So Word 2013 is now ready for me to edit the document and I can go in and just edit it in the usual way. Now note when I’m editing that at whatever point I finish I can do File, I can do a Save. It’s actually treating it as a PDF document. Note in the header there, that it’s still got that same file name, PDF. If I do a File, Save As and then say to my own computer, by default Word will try to save it in .docx format; so the current Word document format which is absolutely fine because I can save it in .docx format if I want to. Alternatively, of course, I can switch to PDF and save it perhaps with a new file name in PDF format. So it’s a pretty straightforward process and it works pretty well. There are a couple of issues mainly related to graphics, as I said earlier. The other thing that I’ve found can cause problems is filling in form fields in PDFs. But for the basic use of opening and editing a PDF document it works well. I suggest that you give that a try, open a PDF document that you believe to be safe and just make sure that you can edit it and you may even be able to detect some of the issues with graphics and so on and things to beware of when you’re using PDF documents for input. That’s it on that subject. I’ll see you in the next section.

© Copyright 2008-2013 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Word 2013

© Copyright 2008-2013 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Word 2013

Chapter 20 – Tables Video: Creating a Table; Inserting, Selecting and Deleting Rows and Columns Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section and the next one, we’re going to look at Tables which are a very important feature of Word and also can provide the linkage to some of the other components of the Office product set, as you’ll see a little bit later on. So first of all, let’s just create a straightforward table so that you can see what we use tables for and how we create them. So to demonstrate creating a table and how to use a table, I’m going to make a list of the top five movies of 2012, obviously this is a very subjective list. You’ll get a chance to do something similar a little bit later on. And what I’m going to do, I’ve written a short statement here. Here is a list of my Top 5 Movies of 2012. And what I’m going to do is to insert a table with details of those five movies. Now I’m going to do it quite badly because I want the opportunity to show you how to correct things a little bit later on in the section. So I go to the Insert tab, click on Insert Table which is in the Tables Group there, just click on the arrow, and what I get is a graphic where I can decide what size table I want. Now I’m thinking five movies so I need five rows. I’m going to put each movie in a row and I’m going to have the title and a number, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and I’m going to have maybe the director, something like that. So that’ll do. I’ll click on that and I’ve now got a table. The table consists of rows. These are the horizontal rows. There are five rows. And Columns, there are three columns, 1, 2, 3. And there’s a border around each of the intersections. These intersections where rows and columns intersect, they’re called cells. So this table’s actually got 15 cells, five by three cells, and that’s basically one way of creating a table. Now having inserted a table, it’s important to understand that when you’re working on your document, sometimes you’ll be inside the table or the cursor rather will be inside the table and sometimes outside. So if I click anywhere within the table, say put the cursor there, note that I have two additional tabs on the Ribbon, Design and Layout. And they are the Table Tools tabs and we’ll be looking at those in just a moment. But when I’m inside the table, I see those; if I

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Learn Word 2013 click outside the table, of course, they go away. Now let me click in the first cell, that’s in row one, column one and to put some content into the table, all I need to do is to type. So I’m going to put a one for my first place movie there and then I can click in the second column, still the first row, second column, and type in now the name of my number one movie. Now, of course, we’ll all disagree about what this might be but I’m going to put in there Skyfall. To go to the name of the director, again, I could click in here the top of the third column, but if I press the Tab key, the Tab key takes me to the next logical typing position. So now I’ll type the director name in there and then I’ll type two or three more of the movies and their directors. Now at the end of the first row I press the Tab key, it takes me to row two, column one so I can just carry on typing. So now I have the basic content of the table completed and although I’ve got in there the information that I set out to put in, it doesn’t really look very attractive and I’ve just realized that I’ve forgotten a couple of things. First of all, I was intending to put some headings on the table to explain what the numbers are, what the middle column is, what the right hand column is. So what I want to do now is to add a row, a new row at the top of the table. So let’s see how to do that. First of all, if I click inside row one so that I have the table tools, I’m going to use the Layout tab and one of the options in the Layout tab is Insert above, it’s in the Rows and Columns Group there. If I click on Insert above, what I get is a new row above, the one where the cursor was placed. So let me now put into that new row the headings that I wanted. Don’t worry too much about the fact that it doesn’t look very nice at the moment, let’s just get the content in to begin with. Now the other omission was that I was going to put the name of one of the lead actors in another column. So I need an extra column, a fourth column. So the procedures pretty similar. If I click somewhere in the third column, it doesn’t really matter where, and then on the Layout tab in the table tools, one of the options is Insert right. Now when you’re doing this sort of insert, let’s suppose I’m going to do an insert right, if I want to insert a single column which is what I want to do, then I would just put the cursor anywhere in that column and the new one will be to the right of that. If I wanted to insert two columns, if I actually select two columns, let me show you

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Learn Word 2013 how that works. Let me just select these two columns with the mouse and then do an insert right. I actually get two new columns. Now, on this occasion, I don’t want two new columns so I undo that. I’ll just put the cursor in the right and if you’ve just got the cursor somewhere and do an insert right, you get a single column to the right of the column containing the cursor. So I’ve got a bit more typing to do now. So hopefully that gives you a good idea of how to insert content into a table, how to add to the number of rows, add to the number of columns. There are a couple of things worth bearing in mind, one of them as I said just now, if you put the cursor somewhere in the table, I’ve got it in that cell with the movie name Looper in it. In the Rows and Columns Group on the Layout tab of the table tools, you’ve got Insert above, Insert below, Insert left, Insert right, and I’ve already explained that if you have more than one row or column selected, then the insert will insert the corresponding number. But there are also some special cases that are worth knowing about. For instance, if I wanted to do not the top five but the top ten, I could, of course, just select a cell in the bottom row, row five here and then do insert below. But in fact, if I type in the name there Jennifer Lawrence and press the Tab key, then when you’re on the last cell in a table it automatically adds an additional row at the end. So that would automatically give me row six. Now, one of the other very important things to be able to do in a table is not to insert rows and columns but to be able to delete them. So for example if I put the cursor into the cell containing the word Looper here, go to the Layout tab in the table tools, there’s a button there, Delete. If I click on the arrow at the bottom there, I see that I have options of deleting a cell or a selection of cells. In this case, there is only one. Deleting columns which will delete the columns containing the current selection, delete rows which will delete the rows containing the current selection, or indeed delete table which will delete the whole table containing the current selection. So for instance, if I selected two of these cells and clicked there, Delete columns would delete both of the columns Movie and Director because the selection I’ve currently got is in those two columns. So let’s suppose that I just want to get rid of the last row in the table, the empty one. If I click in there, click on the Delete, and then delete rows, it just deletes the row that would’ve been row six for me.

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Learn Word 2013 Now one of the things I’ve done a couple of times there but haven’t really explained is making a selection in a table. And being able to make selections in tables is a very important thing to be able to do. If I put the cursor again in the cell with the word Looper in it and go to the Layout tab again, in the Table Group on the left there at the top, there’s a button that says Select and it’s one way of making a selection in a table. Now if I click on Select cell, it just selects the cell that has the cursor in it. So it’s just got that one cell, Looper. And if I want to do something to just that cell that’s the selection I make first. If I were instead to click Select column, it would make a new selection containing the whole of the Movie column. And if now I were to select row what do you think would happen? Well, you might think that just the row containing Looper would be selected, but it wouldn’t be because when you do this select, it’s always based on what you’ve got now. So when I say select row, it says select the whole of the row for every current part of the current selection. So at the moment, I’ve got the whole of the Movie column selected. If I do select row, I’ll effectively select the whole table. So if I just wanted to select the row containing Looper, put the cursor there, select row, and I’ve just got the row containing Looper. Now apart from using those commands, there are various other ways of making selections within a table. For instance, if I wanted to select those two columns, Movie and Director, if I put the cursor to the left of the word Movie and just click there, I can drag with the mouse and select those two columns. And of course, it works in the same way for touch. So if I wanted to select, say, part of the first column, all I could do is to tap on the word Position then just drag down with my finger for a few cells and I’ve made a selection of the first four cells in the first column of the table using touch. Now in this section, we’ve concentrated on creating the table, making it the right number of rows and columns, getting the data in, and also being able to adjust the data in columns to make selections, do deletions, and so on. In the next section, we’re going to concentrate on the design and presentation of the table. So please join me for that.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Formatting Tables Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In the previous section, we looked at tables for the first time and we created this table showing a rather subjective list of the top five movies of 2012. In this section, we’re going to work on the design and layout of this table. The very first thing I’m going to do though is sort of related to inserting data because one aspect of the layout of the table is that you don’t have to have it quite as regular as this. I’ll give you an example of the sort of thing that you can do. Now, first of all, I’m going to insert another new row above that top row. Now you should remember how to do that. We can click in the top row and then use the Layout tab. There is another way. If I right click, I get a contextual menu and one of the options on the contextual menu, about halfway down is an Insert and there’s one there Insert rows above. Now this does rather reflect the fact that when you’re dealing with tables, there are several places in which you can find the relevant commands to insert or delete columns, rows, and so on as well as the Layout tab buttons that we’ve seen in contextual menus. There’s another one or two options that we’ll look at a little bit later on. So Insert rows above. I now get a new row with four empty cells. Now sometimes you don’t actually want a table to be quite as regular as this one appears to be and let’s suppose that I want to put that heading “Here is a list of my Top 5 Movies of 2012” as a title within the table, spanning the whole width of the table. Now one way of doing that is if I click in the first cell in the first row and drag across with the mouse so I’ve got four cells selected and then go to the Layout tab, one of the options is Merge cells and that will cause to happen, let me just click away, is that I have a single cell in that first row of the table. If I then select the text “Here is a list of my Top 5 Movies of 2012”, Cut it, so I’m going to use the keyboard shortcut Control-X, get rid of that colon, click within that single cell and Paste it. I’ve now got a heading, a title on my table. Now it’s actually possible to do all sorts of combinations of merging cells which is what we’ve just done there and also splitting cells. If I select a particular cell, say click in this one, I could split this cell either back into four cells or I could split it into three cells or two cells or in fact

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Learn Word 2013 pretty much any number that I want to. I’m not going to go into that in any more detail now. I just wanted to show you that happening in one situation. And now I want to look at improving the presentation a little bit. I’m going to start with that title. The most obvious thing about the title that would make it look better would be if we could actually center it within its cell. Now doing that is absolutely straightforward because if I just click within that cell, bear in mind that I’ve got here selected a paragraph effectively, although it’s within a cell in a table. I can just use the regular paragraph formatting commands that I’ve used much earlier on in the course. So I could, for instance, just go to the center command and that centers that heading within its cell. Now another obvious area where something like that would probably be useful would be in this very first column where I’ve got the Position but the numbers are all left justified. If I wanted to center align everything in that column, all I would need to do, click anywhere within the column. I can either drag with the mouse or use the finger if I’m using a touch screen, but let’s go back to that Layout tab again and say Select column. I’ve now got the column selected. Note the first column includes that merged one, the one we merged from four into one is actually treated as part of column one. Now let me go back to the Home tab again and press on Center, and now you’ll see that everything in column one which includes that title is centered. So I hope you’ll agree that’s really starting to look a lot better now that table. The one thing now that bothers me is this first column because the first column is much too wide. You don’t need that amount of space to put the numbers one to five. You could even shorten that heading into just Pos or P-O-S-N or something like that.

There’s a very

straightforward way of changing the width of a column in a table in Word 2013, and that is to use the mouse if the mouse is the approach you’re using. There’s an equivalent method you can use with touch. But if I hover the mouse over the line between the first two columns, watch what happens to the shape of the mouse. It changes from the regular cursor shape to a double bar with two little arrows sticking out of the side. When you see that shape click, drag left, and as you can see you can manually change the width of the first column. Notice that it doesn’t affect the title, although the title is technically part of the first column, Word knows that it’s a merged cell and it doesn’t get involved in the same resizing exercise. Now I can see that possibly the Movie

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Learn Word 2013 column is a little bit too wide, maybe not a lot. I could make that a little bit less wide and give both Director and Star a little bit more space as well. And now I think I’ve got the balance of the space a lot better. Now is a good time to point out that you can also use a similar approach to change the height of a row if you want to. So if I click in within the table here, move up or down over the bottom edge of a row whose height I want to change. I can then click, drag down, and that particular row has become taller. I’ll undo that change for now. And of course, I can carry this forward into all sorts of other changes. So for example, if I wanted to center the heading in each column, I could select the three that aren’t centered at the moment, that’s those three, and then go to the Paragraph Group on the Home tab, click on centered, and perhaps even if I select the whole of that row, I could make the headings bold. Now apart from the fact that I could drag across to select a row, if you move the cursor just to the left, there you see the shape of the cursor change to a sort of diagonal black arrow. If you click on that, it selects that single cell. If I move it a little bit further across, I get a white open arrow, click that, and you get the whole row. And I could then make the text bold. So that’s made the headings bold for me. Let’s do the same to the title row, the merged cell. Select, make that bold as well. I could even perhaps make that a larger point size as well. Now as I mentioned earlier, there are many, many ways of doing these things with tables. Let me put the cursor back in the table in the Movie column here and go back on to the Layout tab. If you click on the Properties button in the Table Group on the Layout tab, you bring up a Table Properties dialog. Now with this dialog, you can perform a very wide range of layout functions on a table. Note the tabs tell you what the option you are setting refers to. So the first tab is a set of options related to a whole table, the second one to a row, then to a column, and to a cell. If I look at the table, for example, apart from the fact that you can setup what if effectively the default alignment on the table which here is setup left, and text wrapping at none which means if I have long movie titles, if they don’t fit, they’ll overflow or disappear depending on the other settings. You also have settings for indents and so on. But you have borders and shading settings. So for instance, if I click on Borders and Shading, I can decide whether I want borders

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Learn Word 2013 and shading. So I could, for example, on the table say No borders, click on OK, click on OK again. Now my table has no borders at all. You can also apply borders to single cells, rows, columns, or any combination of those. And just one other thing to point out in that Properties dialog, click on there again; if you look at row, for example, you can specifically enter a height for a row. Similarly, if you go to the Column tab, you can specify a width for a column and you can use these buttons in the case of column say to step through and set specific column widths for each. If you need a very accurately laid out table, of course, you could switch on the ruler and actually line things up with the ruler. So, we’ve seen quite a few ways of making quite a few different settings within tables. There are many more. It’s really a very powerful feature in Word. Now I want to really turn my attention to the design of this particular table. Note that I’ve left the borders off for the moment. I know that I’m still in the table though because I can still see the table tools. So I must still be somewhere inside the table with the cursor. So let’s spend a little bit of time looking at the Design tab. Now the Design tab has really three main groups. The group on the right relates to Borders and then the group on the left has got Table Style Options. I’ll come back to those in just a moment. We’re mainly interested here in the middle one, Table Styles because when you’re working in a table, you can use a predefined style to give your table a nicer look and feel. Let me just click on the drop down to look at the gallery and you can see there’s a very wide range of table styles available. Now with each of them, you have different arrangements for the first row, for the first column, and then you have what’s called Banding. In some cases, let’s take this for example, if you select that style, what you get is a style where you have top row is a darker color, first column is that darker color, but the table in general has a banded style. So the colors change. Visually this makes it easier to read across but also, generally speaking, people think it gives a more attractive sort of look and feel to a table. Now in the Table Style Options at the top left here, there are a number of check boxes. The check boxes can be used to fine tune the choice that you’ve made. So here’s my current choice.

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Learn Word 2013 If I uncheck banded rows in the Table Style Options Group, watch what happens. Turn off banded rows and they’re not banded anymore. I could switch on banded columns. I could switch off coloring for a header row, switch it back on again, and I can switch off coloring for a first column. It’ll be colored the same as all the others. So between table styles and table style options you can achieve many different effects and I think you can see now how attractive we can make a table look in Word 2013. And, of course, the other thing to bear in mind when you’ve chosen a design for your table is that these table designs, these predefined designs are all sensitive to the selected theme. So if I go to the Design tab, go into Themes, and change the Theme here. Let’s say go for Organic or Retrospect or Slice, then that in turn will give me a different design to my table. And, of course, the overall aim here is to make the table fit in not just with the document you’re working on but if you’re preparing a set of documents using components of Microsoft Office, you can select a theme across the whole set of documents and get a nice consistent look and feel to all of the documents that you’re preparing. So I’ve covered pretty much all the basics you need to know about tables in Word 2013. And I’m going to leave you now with a fairly challenging little exercise. I’ve saved this example or something very similar to it as example-13 in the provided example files. You can start with that one or you can start with your own. I’d like you to create your own list of either your top five movies of 2012 or indeed your bottom five movies of 2012. If you’re looking at this course a long time in the future, you may choose a different year. But I want to add something to it. I want you to add an additional column and in that additional column I would like you to include the box office takings of each movie. Now they don’t have to be the real figures. You can look them up on the internet or you can dream up your own figures. It doesn’t really matter. The important thing is that will introduce a column of figures where there is some formatting to do to make those figures into currency figures for the value say in millions of dollars or millions of pounds or millions of Australian dollars or New Zealand dollars, whatever currency you use. And I’d like that to be an additional column in your table. My answer to that is example-14 and I’ll see you in the next section.

© Copyright 2008-2013 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Word 2013

© Copyright 2008-2013 Simon Sez IT, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Learn Word 2013

Chapter 21 – Graphics Video: Inserting, Cropping, Resizing and Positioning Pictures Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to take our first look at graphics in a Word document. This is a very important aspect of using Word because it is very true that a picture can be worth a thousand words and even if you’ve got a thousand very good words, it’s usually the case that a picture adds that something extra that really makes the difference with the documents that you’re working on. Now there are a number of options for inserting graphics in Word 2013 and in this first section, I want to basically run through the types of graphics that we can insert and introduce you to some of the options, tools, and techniques that are available. Now the first job I’m going to do is to insert a couple of photographs into an article about a short trip to Sydney in Australia. And I’ve got a couple of pictures that I want to use; both of them need a little bit of work done on them. But I really want to start just by showing you how to insert a graphic into a document anyway. So I’ve got my text document here. I’ve got a space left here for the picture and on the Insert tab on the Ribbon in Illustrations Group, there’s a whole load of commands and these set of commands really sort of summarize what the options for pictures, for graphics are. First of all, we have a button there, Pictures, and if you look at the screen tip it says From File. If you have a picture in a file which may well be something like a photograph from a cell phone, a mobile phone, then this is the button you use to put that picture into your document. Online pictures, let me just click on online pictures. This gives access to three things really. First of all, it gives access to the Office.com ClipArt that we’ll be looking at later on and as it says the royalty free photos and illustrations. You’re probably very familiar with ClipArt. You may not know it by that name, but we’re going to do a bit of work with ClipArt in a couple of sections time. Bing Image Search gives us access to Bing to search for images on a particular subject. And Toby SkyDrive, that gives me access to SkyDrive. We’ll be looking at SkyDrive a little bit later on in the course. The third option here is Shapes and this gives us access to a whole gallery of shapes that we can put into a document. So if you wanted say to put a colored square or pointy arrows or something like that, this is the option that you

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Learn Word 2013 use. You can also build up more complete drawings by combining shapes together. Again, we’ll be looking at that a little bit later on in the course. The next option is SmartArt. Now SmartArt is very important because it gives us access to some sort of composite graphics that not only can be quite sophisticated drawings but they’re smart. You can actually change them with a high level of automation to suit your requirements. We’ll come back to SmartArt later as well. Then we have an option, Chart. Charts particularly are used for representing numeric data. So a little bit later on in the course we’ll take an example where we’ve got some numeric data and we’re going to draw a chart to represent it. This option is the one we would use to insert a suitable chart. And then the final option here, Screenshot, let’s us take a Screenshot from any other window that’s open on our device, on our computer and include that in a Word document. Again, that’s one for later on. So I have the cursor in the correct position. I’ve got a space left here for the picture. I go to the Insert tab, click on Pictures, and it takes me to a folder where I’ve got the pictures I’m going to choose from to put the couple of photos into this article. Now the first one I’m going to include is this picture of the Harbor Bridge taken from the side of a boat from quite a distance. So I’m going to click on that, click on Insert, and as you can see there, I’ve got a reasonable image of the Harbor Bridge but I’ve got a load of stuff in this picture that I don’t really want as well. So I want to remove part of this picture and that’s called Cropping. And the first thing we’re going to do is to find out how to crop a picture. And that’s a straightforward and a very common requirement within Word 2013. Now it’s very important when we’re doing some of these things on pictures that you always make sure that when you work on a picture, you’ve actually got the picture itself selected. And you’ll know it’s selected because you’ll see these handles in the corners. There’s a little rotation tool up there as well. And when it’s selected, I have an additional tab on the Ribbon, it’s the Format tab. It comes under Picture Tools. And one of the picture tools on the right in the Size

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Learn Word 2013 Group is Crop. So if I click that Crop button, I’ve actually enabled cropping in the picture and what happens is in addition to those sizing handles, you can see these little black shapes in the middle of the sides and in the corners and they’re the shapes that we drag in order to crop a picture. So first of all, let me try to lose the bottom part of the picture. Put the mouse over that cropping handle in the middle at the bottom, drag it up, and I’m going to put that there. And then I’m going to lose a bit of the sky as well by going to the cropping handle at the top in the middle and pulling that down. And what I’ve effectively done is to select the part of this picture that I want to keep, the lighter part, the darker part, the part of the pictures that’s going to be removed when I execute the crop that will actually be removed. So to execute the crop click on the drop down arrow and click on Crop and there we are. I’ve now reduced the picture to a size that includes the parts of the picture that I’m actually interested in. Don’t worry too much about the quality of the images here because I’m actually concentrating on showing you how to do things. We’ll do a few improvements to the images later on. So note at the moment that that picture is now not selected, I can’t see any selection handles on it. So click on the picture to make sure it’s selected. The Format tab appears again. Let me just click on the Format tab. Within the Size Group over here, there are a number of options for setting the size of a picture and we’re going to insert another picture and resize that in a moment. But if you look at the crop drop down that we used just now, note that you have options such as crop to shape. You can actually crop a picture to some fairly sophisticated shapes. So you could make it a cross shape or an arrow shape. You can also specify what aspect ratio you’d like when you crop a picture. So there are quite a few different options and settings within sizing and cropping of pictures. There isn’t time to go through them all on this course, but there’s some great things there for you to experiment with. What we’re going to look at now is a straightforward resizing of a picture. So let’s insert another picture but this time what we’re going to do is to leave the whole picture but we’re just going to change its size. So if I scroll down the document, further down on the second page, the document mentions the Opera House. Take a walk around the Opera House, it says. So let me click to the left of the T in

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Learn Word 2013 Take a walk, go back to the Insert tab, click on Pictures again. This time I’m going to use one of these pictures of the Opera House. I’m going to use that one. Click on Insert and I now have a picture of the Opera House inserted, a little bit more colorful picture. Now I don’t want this particular picture to occupy the whole width of this column on the page so I’m going to make the picture smaller. Now while it’s selected, I’ve got the Format tab and within the Size Group I have a number of options. I could change the height by using this control here. I can type a height in or I can use the little tumblers to change the height. Now watch what happens as I change the height, it changes that height as I go. So, let me just set that back. An alternative is to drag the picture by the handles. Now as you should know when you’re resizing a picture, note that we’re not cropping. If I use say the middle on the side sizing handles what I’ll do is compress the picture in the horizontal direction.

So I’m basically changing the picture.

Similarly, if I do resizing middle ones at the bottom that will squash the picture as well. I don’t want to distort the picture. To keep the aspect ratio, it’s got I would use the sizing handles at the corners. So if I use the one in the bottom right corner and pull up, it keeps the shape of the picture; the aspect ratio of the picture. So let’s assume that that’s the effect that I want to achieve. Now one very important thing here, note what happens to the words “Take a walk around the Opera House where you can enjoy”. Those words start right next to the picture. So they’re not below the picture, they’re on the same line as the picture. And what you can do in Word 2013 is to make words flow around pictures and that’s what we’re going to look at next. Now making text flow around a picture is one of those things that you’ll do a lot in Word and there are not only several options in terms of how you do it, but there are several tools you can use. With the picture selected, for example, on the Format tab there is in the Arrange Group a Wrap Text button. And if you click on the drop down there, Wrap Text, it gives you options of how you want to arrange the picture in relation to the text. So do you want it in line with the text? Do you want it square? Do you want it tight? Now this is live preview. So as I hover over these, you can see what each option looks like. In line with text is what we have now. Square would look like that. So the text is basically starting at the top of the picture and flows around it. Tight, effectively the same result but it’s a tighter fit. There’s less of a space between

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Learn Word 2013 the picture and the text. Through, top and bottom, behind text, and so on. So the behind text might be a good effect if you want to give a sort of background graphic to a piece of text. In front of text, so the text is behind the picture. Maybe you make the picture slightly transparent so you could see through it to the text behind. So there are many options. But you may also have noticed this little control here. This is the Layout Options control. If I click on that I also get Layout Options. So in line with text is what I’ve got now, but then I have square, etc. So this is another control, another way of looking at the options for laying out. Go into More, go into Text Wrapping, and again a different representation of how you want all this to look. I’m going to select square on this occasion. I can control the distance between the text and the picture using the controls at the bottom here. Click on OK and I’ve now got the text flowing around the picture. And something else to bear in mind here is that although we’ve pretty much used an automated approach to get to that point, you can also drag a picture around. So let’s suppose that I wanted to move this picture a little bit further down within the text referring to the Opera House. If I click on the picture to select it and then drag down a little, you can see now I’ve got the text flowing right round the picture of the Opera House. I can even, again if I click on it, hold the mouse down, and pull it over to the right I could even put it on the right hand side of the column. So you’ve got pretty flexible and powerful facilities in Word 2013 for flowing text around pictures and for positioning pictures on a page. So you can now position pictures in a document and the next thing we’re going to look at is some of the work we can do to modify, to improve a picture, and to apply effects to pictures in documents and that’s what we’re going to look at in the next section. So I’ll see you then.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Picture Styles; Picture Adjustments, Corrections and Effects Toby: Hello again and welcome back to this second section on graphics in our course on Word 2013. Before we move on to formatting graphics, I’d like to look again at the insert function. Now when you go to insert a picture from a file, you see the dialog that we’ve seen already and when you’re looking for the file name, there’s a drop down on the right here, let me just click on that to drop down, and that basically lists the graphic formats that you can insert into a Word 2013 document. Now some of these formats are very well known. So for instance, JPEG perhaps the best known of all, very often used for compact cameras, digital cameras in general tend to use JPEG format; even cell phones, mobile phones use that format as well. You have other formats that you may well have heard of such as Graphics Image Format, GIF format, which is very often a format that’s used for images on the web because it’s very small, it doesn’t support a high number of colors. But GIF files tend to be very small. Whereas if you want high quality Windows Bitmap, BMP format is often the one that’s used although it has the disadvantage that the files in BMP format tend to be very big. These are basically the formats that you can insert and the procedure for inserting graphics in these formats is the same whichever format you’re using. You just need to make sure it’s on the list basically. There are some other converters for different formats that are available. You may well have them in your installation of Word 2013. But if you’re in any doubt as to which format of graphic you can insert, just bring that dialog up, check that drop down list on your installation, and you’ll see which formats of graphic you can insert. Now in order to demonstrate some of these formatting options, I’m going to make this picture of Sydney Opera House a little bit bigger again. I’m not really going to worry too much about the text flowing aspects of this. I really just want to do a little bit of work on the graphic. And one thing I should mention to you before we really get started is this, when you’ve inserted a graphic in the way that we have, when you’re making these formatting changes to the graphic, you’re only applying them to the copy that’s in the document. You won’t affect the original picture. So if for instance I changed the coloring of this or I crop it or resize it, the changes I’ve made are on the copy of the picture that’s in the document not on the original. Now there’s a big word of caution there. There are ways of inserting graphics into Word documents where you are linked

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Learn Word 2013 to the original and changes would affect the original. You need to make sure that you’re not in that situation. If you’ve inserted a graphic the way we have so far, then there’s absolutely no problem. But there are ways of doing it where there is a linkage. So just be careful and be aware of that. So let’s do a little bit of work on presenting this picture of Sydney Opera House. The pictures selected. Go to the Format tab in picture tools and we’re going to look first at Picture Styles, this group Picture Styles. Now there are three commands on the right that let us work on individual aspects of how the picture is presented: picture border, picture effects, picture layout. I’ll come back to those in just a moment. But we also have on the left a gallery of potential picture styles. You’ve got an up and down arrow there, but if you click on the lower More button, that’s the one with the little arrow and the bar over it, you see a presentation of picture styles. Now each of these is a combination of factors. There’s potentially a border or a frame around the picture, maybe a rotation of the picture by some amount. In some cases, the actual shape of the pictures been changed, it’s been cropped into an oval shape for example. And these are all live preview. So let’s try one or two of these. There you can see that same picture with a frame round it. Here we have an oval effect. Notice also in this case that you’ve got a reflection under the picture on the page, and there are various different preset styles you can choose for this picture. Let’s suppose we choose that one. Each of them has got a name. That’s center shadow rectangle. And you can see how you’ve got shadow and a sort of slightly rounded effect to the shadow as well. Now apart from using those preset styles, you do have these other commands on the right, picture border which gives you ability to add a border to a picture so you can choose things like what shape to have. So I could just have a solid line as a border. You can also, same thing, go in there and choose a weight for the solid line. So I could have a really thick solid line if I wanted to and I could also change the color of the border. I should point out the colors, as usual, are divided into theme colors and standard color. So if I want to stick with the theme colors, I could choose perhaps that as a theme color. And in that way, I can individually adjust the border or in fact completely remove the border. So say no outline on that image.

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Learn Word 2013 So picture effects is the next command in the group on the right on picture styles. This enables us to go either for one of the presets. There are a number of standard presets here and there are also some 3-D options. But the styles generally can be made up of a combination of shadow, reflection, glow, soft edges, bevels, and 3-D rotation. So I could even do something like this with the picture and basically have it rotated in 3-D. I can also use this little rotation tool here to make it an even more extreme effect. Now the third of these buttons here which is labeled picture layout is one that we use in relation to SmartArt. So I’m not going to look at the moment because we’re going to look at SmartArt later on. And one other thing I’d like to look at in the Picture Styles Group, just go to the little dialog box Launcher down here. The dialog box Launcher brings up a Format Picture Panel or Pane on the right here and with this we can go into these individual effects such as shadow, reflection. And rather than choose from a gallery in the case, say, of reflection, we can look at one of the presets, say, that particular preset which has settings for the elements that make up the preset, transparency, size, blur, and distance, and we can adjust each of these. You’re not restricted to presets on any of these. You can choose a preset to get you started and then you can pretty much adjust it to whatever setting you want, experimenting using live preview and so on. So you’ve got shadow and reflection, glow, soft edges, 3-D format, 3-D rotation, artistic effects; many, many things that you can apply to such a picture. So I’m going to close the Format Picture Pane and I’m going to go back a few steps on this picture. I want to take it back to an earlier status. Now from this situation, we’re going to look at one of the options in the Adjust Group and that is Remove Background. Now one thing I need to point out to you about this is although it’s a really good effect, it sometimes needs quite a bit of manual intervention. So trying this one, I hope it’ll give us a good effect. If it doesn’t, I’ll briefly describe what you would do to improve the effect, but you might find this particularly attractive when you’re working on your documents. So the picture is selected, I click on Remove Background and what Word does is it inspects the picture and it marks in that sort of purple color what it considers to be the part it’s going to remove. Now you can adjust that. You have some buttons here: mark the areas to keep and you

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Learn Word 2013 can actually effectively draw with a pen what you want to keep, you can draw with a pen what you want to remove and you can delete the marks that you’ve made. If as is the case here, I look at that and I think, yeah that might look about right. So let’s assume that I’ve sort of done my adjustments. If I click on Keep changes, it will actually remove the background from the picture. If I make changes and I think, oh no! This is getting a mess. I need to start again. There’s an option here for discard all changes. Let’s go with keep changes for the moment, tick that, click away, and you can see what it’s done. Now in this case, that’s not ideal. Maybe I don’t really want that area of Sydney Harbor, the water in Sydney Harbor but it’s still quite a nice effect and usually remove background in its automatic mode does produce a pretty good stab at what it’s trying to do. I’ve put the background back and I’ve made the picture a little bit bigger because the next thing we’re going to look at in the Adjust Group are Artistic effects. Now once again, if I click on artistic effects, I get a gallery with live preview. One of the things here in terms of showing some of these artistic effects is that it does take Word a little while to do the live preview because it’s got quite a lot of picture data to update. So I’m not going to show you a load of these. Let me just try one or two. Let’s try that one to begin with. Note the little spinning circle over the thumbnail there. While it’s working out that effect, it calls that Pencil sketch. So it’s taken our photo of Sydney Harbor and made it look like a pencil sketch. Let’s try a different one. Down at the bottom, this is a bit of an extreme one down at the bottom. Glow edges. Again, it’s made it into more of a sort monochrome effect but with slightly colored glowing edges. There are many of those and if you want a bit of fine tuning on those, you can go artistic effects options. It takes you into that Format Picture Pane, again with the artistic effects section opened up and again, you can go in and adjust many aspects of each artistic effect. So let me just go back to the top of this document again, back to the first picture we inserted which was that cropped picture of Sydney Harbor Bridge. Let me select that one this time. Now the other two main buttons I want to look at in Adjust are Corrections and Color. Let’s start with corrections. It may well be that you need to correct an image and you may not have the opportunity or the tools or whatever to adjust or correct the image in another piece of software. Well you can do quite a lot within Word itself. Now these are divided into a Sharpen and Soften

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Learn Word 2013 Group. So you could for instance use that one. You see how that’s made that picture much more blurry or I can make it much sharper at the other end of the spectrum. So if I need to sharpen or soften, I can use one of those settings along there. It is in the middle when it begins. And I can also adjust brightness and contrast. So if I thought, well, that’s a pretty dull looking picture. Why don’t I go for that? That sort of brightened up that picture quite a bit. And then similarly, with Color, I can do color adjustments. I can do color saturation. Note that when you go into this the current setting, the middle one, is the outlined one. So that’s what it is now. You can reduce or increase color saturation. You can adjust color tone and you can recolor in some quite extreme way. So if I wanted to, for instance, I could give it a sort of olive green accent like that. So there’s quite a lot you can do in terms of adjustments to pictures from within Word. You can do this once you’ve already inserted the image into Word. So that’s pretty much all the basics that you need to know about in terms of positioning and making various adjustments, corrections, and applying styles to pictures. Many of these things will apply to other types of pictures as well, such as ClipArt for example, where you can also apply some of the effects and the positioning rules pretty much the same. In the next couple of sections, we’re going to look at some of the other options like ClipArt and shapes and so on. Just one last thing to mention here which is quite an important point. If you’re working on a picture like this one, it’s selected, one of the other buttons in the Adjust Group, bottom right hand one, there is a Reset button, Reset picture. What do you think would happen here if you click on Reset picture and size? Let’s just click that and see what happens. It does undo all of those adjustments that we’ve made but when it does that it resets the picture to its very original size. Now when it did the insert, it reduced the size in order to fit into the column that was available. What it will do here is to put it back to the actual original size that it is in the original picture. So you could finish up with a quite unexpected result. And if you’re doing resets which you might want to do sometimes, just be aware that can be a danger. Sometimes it’s best just to do a few undo’s to get back to the point where you need to be. That’s really just a word of warning. That’s it on this section in graphics. I’ll see you in the next one.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Online Pictures and ClipArt Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at inserting online pictures and primarily we’re going to look at ClipArt. Now I have a technical document here about project management and how to track progress on a project and I want to put in a picture just to sort of brighten it up, make it a little bit more interesting. So I quite like the idea of putting in a picture of somebody perhaps sitting using a computer. And rather than use a photograph, I want to use some ClipArt. In earlier versions of Word, there was actually ClipArt supplied with Word; not a particularly big range but quite a few things that you could use in this kind of situation. But increasingly the ClipArt available to Word has been available online in Office.com and in Word 2013 that basically is your source for ClipArt. So if I click on Online pictures in the Illustrations Group on the Insert tab, one of the options as we saw earlier is Office.com ClipArt. If I select that and then actually indicate what sort of thing I’m looking for, ClipArt really covers photos and illustrations. So let me try just putting in the word Computer to begin with, press the Enter key, and then I’m shown a range of available ClipArt. This is all royalty free ClipArt. So I can scroll through what’s available. Okay, I think I might try this one; Man and woman at computer. Select that, click on Insert, and that picture is inserted into my document. Now, of course, I know how to adjust the flow of the text around the picture so I’m going to click on that Layout options button. I’m going to go for the option we did before, square, click away. Yeah, that’s fine. Now although this is a drawn illustration as we’ve already seen, inserting it is pretty similar to the way we insert a photo as is flowing text around it. If I click on the ClipArt, I get the Picture Tools Format here. Look at the Format tab. Some of the effects, I can’t apply to ClipArt. So I can’t, for instance, remove the background or apply artistic effects. But I could adopt a picture style. So for instance, I could do something like that and put them within a frame. And many of the other features that are available which we looked at in an earlier section, things to do with picture border, picture effects, and so on are all available. Similarly, I can grab the picture and I can put it in a different position on the page. So in many ways it works in a very similar way to the way that photographs work.

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Learn Word 2013 Now let’s just go back to the Insert tab again, and again on online pictures, I mentioned earlier SkyDrive. We’re going to look at SkyDrive later but SkyDrive in the context of inserting pictures really works as though it’s another folder on your computer in that you can keep pictures in your SkyDrive storage area and then you can insert those pictures as though they were actually on your computer. The other option I want to look at here is the Bing Image Search. Now with Bing Image Search, it works a little bit like Office.com ClipArt except that this search is the web for images covering a particular topic. If I just put in Computer here, I would certainly get a lot of hits. Let’s just try that. Let’s try. Computer, press Enter, and what it actually comes up with is getting for 300,000 results, 300,000 images. Now this is a restricted search because what it finds, first of all, is images that are licensed under Creative Commons. Now I’m not going to go into a definition or description of what Creative Commons is in detail now. You can certainly look it up on creativecommons.org or on Wikipedia, but basically it’s a fairly open and fairly flexible licensing system, but there are different levels of licensing. I believe there’s about half a dozen different levels of licensing. And the fact that something is within the Creative Commons framework does not mean that it’s free to use and that there are no rules governing the use of something. You may at the very least need to put an acknowledgement of the author or creator of something you’re including. Generally speaking, when you are going to put any document into the public domain with images or indeed text in it, you must be careful that you don’t upset any kind of copyright rules or that you don’t pay royalties on images or whatever it might be. Creative Commons is a good starting point but as it says here, “Please review the specific license for any image you want to use.” Now if Creative Commons doesn’t provide what you want, you can do Show all web results and you’ll get a very big number; in this case over 18 million images of computers. Now with these they may well be subject to copyright. There may be copyright issues. There may be royalty issues and so on. Ensure that you have proper rights before inserting an image. This really is the important thing if what you’re going to do is going to be in the public domain. You need to be careful about copyright and about royalties. But in terms of the mechanism, I’ve shown you how to do it. If you wanted to use one of these you

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Learn Word 2013 could click on that, click on Insert, and that image will be inserted into the document and you could pretty much process it in the same way we processed any other images already. So that’s it on inserting online pictures. In the next section, we’re going to look at inserting shapes. So I’ll see you then.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Inserting and Formatting Shapes and Textbox Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. We’ve been looking at graphics in the last few sections and in this section we’re going to carry on. We’re going to look at inserting shapes into a document. A little bit later we’re going to look at textboxes but let’s start with shapes in general. I’m going to stick with this article about project management, the first few shapes won’t particularly relate to that, but let me make a little bit of space in the document. On the Insert tab in the Illustrations Group, Shapes, click on the drop down and I can see the range of shapes that’s available to me. At the top, there’s a list of recently used shapes. This is particularly useful if you tend to use the same shape several times, perhaps when you’re working on a long document or a set of documents. But other than that the shapes are divided into categories. So we’ve got lines, rectangles, what are called the basic shapes, then block arrows, equation shapes, and so on. Right down at the bottom, we have an option of new drawing canvas where we can start working on a new drawing. Let’s take one of the common types of shapes. Let’s take this picture, this heart shape picture here, and let’s insert a heart into the document. Now, first of all, you click heart and you can’t actually see that anything has happened. But the cursor has changed to a cross hair and I now draw that shape with the cursor. So click once with the mouse and then I can draw out the heart shape. Now by now you shouldn’t be surprised to learn that many of the things that we’ve seen already in relation to graphics apply to these shapes. So for instance, if I look at the Format tab under drawing tools with the shape selected, many of the commands that we’ve already seen are still there. Some of them aren’t and we’ve got some new ones as well. One of them that is, is the commands related to wrapping text. So if I took this shape and moved it into say that paragraph there and then click on the options here. I’m going to use square. The option we’ve used several times before. I can see that I can actually wrap the text around that shape. Similarly, if I select the shape I’ve got drawing handles so I can increase or decrease the size. So many of the things work in exactly the same way, but some of the available commands and some of the available functions do work in a different way for shapes. Let’s look at a couple of examples. On the Format tab on the left, we have Insert shapes as a group. We can insert

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Learn Word 2013 another shape. So I could, for instance, click here shapes. I could go for say a hexagon there as well and I could draw a hexagon. Two shapes on the same picture. I can in fact overlap them and so on. I can also arrange again different word wrapping to cope with the second shape. So you can build up pretty sophisticated pictures and arrange pretty sophisticated text wrapping using that kind of approach. Something I mentioned much earlier on in the course is that you can actually combine shapes together to make more sophisticated and complex shapes. So having added these two they still operate as independent shapes. If I select the first one and then hold the control key down and select the second one so that both are selected, note that I’ve got sizing handles, etc. around both shapes. On the Format tab in the Arrange Group, one of the buttons over there is Group Objects. If I click on that and click on Group, I make those two shapes into a single shape, a group. And if I then move the shape, they move as a pair, a grouped pair. With that group selected, it’s then quite straightforward to ungroup the shapes again. Now I’m not going to go into grouping and ungrouping any more in this course. It’s outside the scope. But you can also change the order in which you can see the shape. So you can bring a shape forward, send the shape backwards, and so on. But let’s look at one or two of the individual properties of shapes that we can set. Now one thing about these shapes and many other shapes is that you can actually put text into them. So with the hexagon there selected, I could for instance type the word Hello. I can then even select the text and on the Home tab say I could change the point size. So having selected the text I could maybe make it say 28 point; nice big text. Go back to the Format tab again and with that shape still selected, there are shape styles I can choose from. So there’s a gallery with a drop down there and I can live preview different styles both for the fill color and for the text, font, and color. So I could for instance go for that color and style of shape. Now I also have in shape styles a number of buttons where I can adjust individual properties of the shape; so for instance the shape fill. I can choose a color, either a color that fits in with the theme, a theme color or one of the standard colors in Word 2013. But I can also do things like I could actually fill this shape with a picture or I could fill it with a gradient. So I could give it a gradient like that. You should just be able to make that out. Or indeed I could fill it with a

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Learn Word 2013 texture; so for instance, something like that. So you can see the range of options that are available to formatting shapes that you’ve inserted into documents in Word 2013. Now one very important aspect of the last change that we’ve looked at when we put the texture in there is as you can see now we have two special tabs on the Ribbon. We have a Drawing Tools Format tab and a Picture Tools Format tab. The Picture Tools Format tab is there because effectively the texture is a picture. The Drawing Tools Format tab is there effectively because we have a hexagonal shape. And what effectively this means is that you’ve got two sets of commands which you can use together to achieve a very wide range of effects. Now we’ve really gone far enough in this. Just briefly show you about the picture tools formatting. If I clicked here, say, on color it would enable me to change the color of the texture within that shape. I could for instance go into this re-coloring option of the black and white re-coloring and get a very different coloring fill there; whereas if I click on the format for drawing tools that enables me to make changes to the shape itself. One of the changes I haven’t talked about so far but which is quite useful and a great one for you to experiment with is over here in the insert shapes box. At the top here, if I click on the drop down here, there is an Edit Points option and you can use this to reshape a shape. When you select that, you get these little black dots at the key points on the shape and you can drag those to actually change the shape a little. So we’ve really gone far enough I think now with the shapes and the options for both formatting drawings and formatting pictures. What I want to look at last in this section is the use of textboxes. Now in order to use a textbox in this document, I’m going to get rid of these shapes that I’ve already added. The heart is quite straightforward. If I select the heart, notice that the perimeter, the bounding selection box is a continuous line; if I just press the Delete key the hearts gone. Now let me select the distorted hexagon. Note how that has got a dashed line around it and the reason is that I actually haven’t got the hexagon selected at the moment. I’ve got the text in it selected. You can probably only just make it out here. You can see a bit of dark shading there where the text selected. This is one of those things that cause a lot of people a lot of grief. They can’t understand why they can’t delete something. All the time you’ve got the text selected when you’re pressing the Delete key, you’re going to be deleting text if there is any. If you want

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Learn Word 2013 to delete the whole shape including the text in it, just click somewhere near the edge until you get the continuous line, now press the Delete key, and that shapes gone as well. So I’ve tidied the rest of the document up a little bit. I’ve moved on to a section here where there’s a bulleted list of three key points for somebody who’s doing some project management work. It’s these three terms: Schedule Start and Finish, Baseline Start and Finish, Actual Start and Finish. I’m just going to open up a little space here and I’m going to insert from shapes, it’s actually in recently used shapes and it’s a textbox. I get the cross hair cursor and now I’m going to draw out a textbox. Now that textbox can contain any amount of text that I want to put in it. Now I want to put into this textbox is those three terms, those bulleted terms. I could type the three terms and then apply bulleting or I can literally just Copy those three, keyboard shortcut Control-C, keyboard shortcut, Control-V and I’ve got those terms into that textbox. Now in order to move the textbox, I need to get the moving cursor. So if I hover over the edge here, I’ve got the four arrow cursor. I’m just going to drag it up the page a bit and, of course, it is a drawing. So that means I get the Format tab, click on format, and I can format that textbox. I could resize it. Let’s suppose I want to resize it like that and like that and then I can look at applying one of these shape styles to it. So what about doing it like that, for instance? Now we have a textbox where we don’t really want the other text to flow around it. So if I look at the layout options on the right here, it’s got a layout option here of in front of text. What I really want is this arrangement where the text is at the top and bottom of it. So I’m going to choose that for my text wrapping option. I also want this to move with the text. So in other words, if I add some additional text, say, before this in the document, that textbox will move down as well. So that’s a move with text option. And then if I click on See More, I come up with some layout options. An important one here is layout options, position. What’s the horizontal position? Well, it’s sort of pushed over to the right here. I’d really like it in the middle. It’s got because of how I put it in an absolute position of 2.29 inches to the right of the column. Supposing I just change that to horizontal alignment, centered on the column, click on OK, and then my textbox looks a lot more sensible. Now you can see from that the level of flexibility we have in positioning a textbox on a page to hold an important message within some text.

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Learn Word 2013 So in this section we’ve looked at inserting and formatting shapes in Word 2013, and in particular we’ve looked at an example of inserting and formatting a textbox. In the next section, we’re going to take a quick look at SmartArt so please join me for that.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: SmartArt and WordArt Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. We’ve been looking at graphics in the last few sections and in the previous section we added this textbox to give a bit of emphasis to a list of three types of scheduling and tracing fields. This is a technical document about project management. A little further up in that document, we talk about four main types of tracking fields: scheduled, baseline, actual, and remaining. And as an alternative to using a list in a textbox like this to emphasis the point that we’re making, we could use a SmartArt Graphic and that’s what we’re going to look at in this section. So I’m going to draw a SmartArt Graphic to show these four main types of tracking field: scheduled, baseline, actual, and remaining. And I’m going to put that diagram in here. So let’s open up a bit of space first and that’s where I’m going to put my SmartArt Graphic. Now on the Insert tab in the Illustrations Group, SmartArt and now I see a dialog, Choose a SmartArt Graphic. Now when you look at this SmartArt Graphic dialog for the first time, you see that one of the pictures in the middle is highlighted, this one with the little blue rectangle around it. That’s the selected SmartArt Graphic. It’s illustrated in more detail and color on the right. It’s called a basic block list and if you look below where it says basic block list, you’ve got a description of what you would use this graphic for. Used to show non-sequential or grouped blocks of information; maximizes both horizontal and vertical display space for shapes. Now this is the sort of diagram you would get if you clicked OK now and inserted this into your document. Now you may look at that and say, Okay that’s fine. But I don’t like those colors and there’s no words in it and I really want not two, two, and one I want three, three, and two. Now the point about SmartArt Graphics is that they are smart. And if you inserted this drawing as basically the sort of graphic you want, you can very easily extend and customize the graphic to your actual requirements. So in this case I could insert that and I could add a couple of extra blocks very easily. I wouldn’t have to draw them in great detail. I’d just follow some standard instructions within the SmartArt Graphic to extend or otherwise customize this particular example.

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Learn Word 2013 So let’s have a look through the available SmartArt Graphics and choose one that might fit our purposes. Now when you open this dialog the selection, the filtering of the available SmartArt Graphics is set to “All” on the left here. That means that in the middle where you look at the basic thumbnails for each of the graphics, you’re looking at all of the available SmartArt Graphics. You can filter them more specifically by using the categories on the left. So the ones that are designed to be used for lists are these ones, process these ones, cycle these ones, hierarchy and so on. And, of course, in each of these if you choose one of the thumbnails, click on it, you get more information about the particular graphic you’ve chosen, what it’s called, and a description of how you would use it in the center. Now in our case, we want to have just basically something with a list of four items in it. So I’m going to go back to the list category, have a look through those. I think I’m going to try that one which is called a vertical box list used to show several groups of information, especially groups with large amounts of level 2 text; a good choice for bulleted lists of information. Well, let’s give that one a try. Let’s click on OK. So having inserted the SmartArt Graphic, what I’m now going to do is to customize it. The first thing I’m going to do though is to zoom out just a little so that I’ve got a little bit more space where I can see what I’m doing. So just use the zoom slider at the bottom to go to 90% zoom. And note that I’ve got two new tabs on the Ribbon: Design and Format, the SmartArt tools, and they basically give me design tools in the first case and formatting tools in the second. So let’s have a look at the design tools first because one of those is add shape. So to add my fourth smart shape all I need to do, I’ve got the first block selected there, click on Add shape. I’ve now got four blocks, and that’s the first requirement in order for me to be able to represent the four categories of tracking field that I want to put into this graphic. Now to add the actual names of the fields, I just need to click into these placeholders for text. So click on that one and I can literally just start typing. So I can type in there Scheduled, Planned, and so on. Now there are a number of commands on this Design tab. Some of them will be enabled or disabled according to which SmartArt Graphic you’re working with and some of them will be enabled or disabled depending on where you are in the graphic. So for example, currently the

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Learn Word 2013 graphic that’s selected is the one with the word Remaining in it. If I wanted to move that down, of course, the command to move it down is disabled because it’s at the bottom. But I could certainly click here to move it up and then, of course, I’ve got both enabled, I can click to move it down. Other commands such as right to left, demote, and so on basically follow the same kind of principle. In terms of layouts, you can choose different layouts. Even though I’ve chosen the graphic that I wanted to use in order to get this list started, if I decided to choose a different type of graphic, for instance supposing I chose the picture caption list; it would automatically adjust what I’ve done to be that completely different sort of list. Similarly, if I go over to SmartArt Styles, the style that I’ve started with I can easily change to be more like that. And then, of course, it’s pretty straightforward to change the color scheme as well. We go to Change colors button here so we can use the primary theme colors or the accented theme colors and perhaps choose a color scheme a little bit more like that for example. So you can see the wide range of options on the Design tab. Let’s look at some of the features on the Format tab. I still have the SmartArt Graphic selected, of course. One of the things you need to be careful of when you’re working on a SmartArt Graphic is that, of course, generally speaking it’s made up of several constituent shapes and when you’re doing things like applying shape styles and so on, then they will be applied to whatever happens to be selected. If you have the whole graphic selected, which is what we have here, watch what happens if I look at shape styles; nothing in fact because it won’t apply the same style to the whole thing. But supposing I selected just the main sort of lozenge styles. I’ll select them; selected the first one then I’m holding the Control key down and selecting all of the others. If I now go into shape styles and let’s choose something that’s not particularly attractive. What about that one? You see how we’ve changed all of those styles. If I wanted to treat one of them differently, of course, let me just treat that one in the middle differently from the others. Just select that one and I could change it to be different from the others. Now amongst the other options for shape styles, we can for instance apply shape effects. So if again, I select three of the four shapes in this case, look at shape effects, I could apply a shadow effect say just to those three. So let’s give those three a little bit of shadow and you can see how they now stand out off of the page a bit. Well, I think on the basis of that you should be able to

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Learn Word 2013 find your way around SmartArt. I often say to you on this course it’s a good thing to experiment with. Well this is a great example of that because there’s so much that you can do with SmartArt to put a really strong, powerful message into documents, particularly technical documents or documents related to sales. But I will just mention one other thing here because WordArt is a well established feature of Word and we’re quite short of space on this course to cover every one of these stylistic effects and features. But WordArt is a pretty straightforward one to use but can give you some very nice effects. It’s available here on the Format tab. Let me just zoom in on this graphic a little bit to make it easier to see. If you’ve got a graphic with some text, let’s say this one with the word Scheduled or Scheduled in it. If I select that text I could apply WordArt. Now WordArt gives me a way of producing colorful text. I can make it do strange things. I can give it a different color fill. I can give it a border, an outline, and I can apply text effects. So for example on the word Scheduled, there I could give it a nice bold effect like that. Notice now how the fill color of the text is changed. It’s got a border around it and so on. And then with the text effects I can give it effects like sort of beveled effect like that. Now it’s quite difficult to see. Let me just zoom in a little bit more and you get some idea of the effect that you get on that text. Now this is not perhaps a particularly suitable location, but WordArt can be used on text pretty much anywhere in a Word 2013 document. So anytime you want to make the text look a little bit fancier with text fill, outlines, effects, changing colors, borders, and so on, then WordArt is a really good tool for that. Now that’s it on SmartArt for now. We’re going to look at another feature of graphics in Word 2013 in the next section and that is the use of Screenshots. So please join me for that.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Screenshots Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In the previous section, we used SmartArt to create this graphic which is now sitting in our technical document and I’m going to move on in this section to look at Screenshots. But before I do, I want to deal with a common situation in Word documents and that is one where a graphic or a big photograph in some cases causes a problem with the way that pages break. This particular graphic is on page two of the document, begins that page, but page one is only half full and the point in the text of the document where the big graphic goes is, leaves a huge space at the bottom of this page. Now there are various ways around this. One way we could get round this would be to make the graphic smaller. But if we don’t particularly want to do that we could, of course, leave the whole thing as it is. But if we don’t want to do that, they way that traditionally people would often go about solving a problem like is to put in a page break in a more convenient place. So if you look at the content of this document, don’t forget we began with some text about tracking progress and we put that ClipArt in. One option would be to say, well, I’m going to make objective start on a new page. Now there are a couple of ways of doing this and one way of doing it, if I go back to the Insert tab is to use one of the instructions, one of the commands on the Insert tab which is Insert Page Break. And if you click on insert page break, you now see that objective starts a page on its own and the whole of that list now fits on one page. In fact, I’ve got one more line than I need there. So position the cursor, click the Backspace key, and I’ve got a much tidier looking objective section.

I could for consistency click in front of Scheduling and

Tracking fields and put another page break in there as well to move that on to another complete third page. So there we are. That’s a bit of a tidying up exercise. Let’s have a look at screenshots now. Now in Microsoft Word, the facility to include screenshots in a document was greatly improved in Word 2010. And with Word 2013, it works pretty much the same way but it’s a very slick way of including screenshots. Typically, you might be in a situation where you’re working in another program and you have something on the screen that you’d really like to sort of take a snapshot of and include in a Word document but you really want to do in as straightforward a way as possible. You might also for example be looking at something on the internet and you want to

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Learn Word 2013 include that. Now given that I’ve got an application open, in fact, I’ve got two or three applications open on this PC at the moment and one of them includes a picture of screen that I need to use in this technical document. To include that as a screenshot, I use one of the commands in the Illustrations Group on the Insert tab and it’s Insert Screenshot. So I place the cursor where I’m going to want the screenshot to go which is just before the word Start there. I’m actually going to open up a blank line to include the screenshot. And then on the Insert tab, Insert Screenshot, click on the drop down, and I’m offered the windows that are available on my PC, the applications that are open. Now the one on the left with the sort of swirling around circle there is the one that’s recording what I’m saying and doing so we’re not going to use that one. The one on the right is Internet Explorer with a bit of the Microsoft website on it. It’s the one in the middle that I want. Now under normal circumstances, if I didn’t want the whole screen, I could use the thing at the bottom, Screen Clipping to crop the part of the screen that I actually want. Now because of the technical issues here with recording, this as I’m doing it I can’t actually demonstrate that. But if you clicked on Screen Clipping on your PC, you would be able to cut out using the mouse cursor, the part that you wanted. I can overcome that here though by including the whole of that screen. So you can see it’s all inserted and now I can set about cropping it. And, of course we saw how to crop it earlier on. So on the Format tab click Crop, then use the cropping handles. I won’t do this particularly accurately, just well enough to give you the general idea. Use the cropping handles to get the part of the screen that I want. That’ll do fine for the moment. And then just click the Crop button and then resize it up a bit more like column width if I want to, and there we are. That’s my cropped screenshot. So that’s it on screenshots. We’ve got one more topic to cover on graphics and we’re going to have a look at Charts in the next section. Please join me for that.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 22 – Charts Video: Creating Charts Toby: Hello and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to carry on with our last section on graphics and we’re going to look at charts. Now the way that charts work in Word 2013 to a large extent depends on whether you have Excel installed as well. If you have Excel installed as well, it’ll work the way that I’m going to show you now. If you haven’t, then it will work using a tool called Microsoft Graph. Now for the purposes of this section, this really doesn’t make an awful lot of difference because I’m going to use a pretty straightforward example. But I think in the majority of occasions, most of you will have Microsoft Excel installed as well so it’s going to look pretty much the same as it does here. Now if you’ve produced charts in Microsoft Office before, in Word or in Excel or any other component, you’ll know that there are many types of chart and the facilities to customize them are pretty extensive. In this section, I’ve only really got time to cover one example in a reasonable level of detail. We’ll create the chart first and then we’ll do some customization, formatting, design work on it. And I’m going to take a pretty simple example. I’m going to draw a simple chart showing the lengths of five African rivers by comparison. Now I’ve created an empty document. Obviously, you would normally be putting a chart into a document that you’re working on so it wouldn’t normally be empty. But it is just like inserting any other graphic. You go to the Insert tab, Illustrations Group, click on Chart, and you see an Insert Chart dialog. Now on the Insert Chart dialog down in the left hand side, you have a list of the main types of chart: column, line, pie, bar, etc. and with each of those there are various sort of sub-categories. So there are different types of bar chart. The first one there, the one that’s currently shown in the sort of thumbnail there is a clustered bar. You have a stacked bar, a 100% stacked bar, a 3-D clustered bar, etc. Now I’m not going to discuss here all the different ways and all the different situations that you would use these charts. We’re going to use one of these bar charts to compare the lengths of these African rivers. So having chosen that I’m going to go

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Learn Word 2013 for the clustered bar and then all I have to do is click OK and I get my chart. Now you may think that’s a bit strange because I haven’t said anything about the African rivers at all yet and yet it’s already drawn a chart in my page. And the reason is that it presents, effectively, a sort of dummy chart. It presents one with dummy data, dummy what are called Series, dummy what are called Categories, and some dummy numbers as well, and it uses those to draw the chart. And all we have to do is to put the real values in, in order to make it the real chart that we want. So first of all, let’s identify the categories. The categories we’re dealing with here are the rivers themselves. If you look at the chart here, the dummy chart that’s drawn, the general idea of a bar chart is that you have categories of something and you’re comparing various properties of that something. So for instance, we might have for four rivers. We might have say the length as one value and say the area of the river delta as another. In our case, we’re only going to have one value for each river but the rivers are the categories. So let’s start by putting those in. This spreadsheet here which is operating as a special case of Microsoft Excel embedded in here. All I have to do is click in one of the cells in the spreadsheet and I’m going to put in the longest river which is obviously the Nile, then I’m going to go down to the next river which is the Congo. Now note what happens as I’m typing these in. As I go through each one look at the chart at the bottom because it’s updating the chart as I go. The next one is the Niger. The next one is the Zambesi. Now you may well be expecting this now to go all horribly wrong because there are only four categories in the chart and I’m going to put five rivers on. So let’s see what happens. I go from Zambesi and I’m now going to put in a fifth river. I’m going to put in the fifth longest which is the Oubangi. Now I’m not going to go down this time. I’m going to go across. Now it automatically because it’s very clever decided that there are five categories here. Now I can reduce the number of categories by deleting a row. I can increase the number of categories as I did there by just entering some more data. Now let me put the actual lengths in, but before I do, let me change what it says there Series 1 to Length and I’m actually going to put length in kilometers. Now the length of the Nile in

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Learn Word 2013 kilometers is 6,695. The length of the Congo is 4,600, the Niger is 4,184, the Zambesi 2,575, and finally the Oubangi is 2,300. So there are my river lengths. Now Word has already worked out that I’m only interested in one series or at least I appear to be only interested in one series because I’ve only put a full set of numbers in for one series. But if there are any doubts about it or in fact this is a good idea anyway, if I select the column there by clicking on the heading, then I can right click and click on Delete, then the second series has gone. Right click on Column C in the spreadsheet again, click on Delete, third series is gone as well, and I’m left with exactly the straightforward bar chart that I want comparing those five lengths. So, it’s as simple as that really to put together a chart. Now there’s a couple of issues with this at the moment. One of them is that because I haven’t put a chart title in the title has come through as Length (km). So all I need to do is to click in there and I can edit that chart title. So let me change it to African Rivers and having done that, I can actually close the data grid there and I’ve got my chart. Now it’s not fully formatted yet but I’ve basically got the information in that I wanted. Of course, I could’ve entered the rivers in the reverse order to have the longest river at the top, but obviously that would depend on the particular situation that I’m in and my own personal preference. So I can now regard the chart as another graphic in a document. If I select the chart, then I have Chart Tools, two tabs. I have a Design tab and a Format tab. I’m going to quickly look at these. Much of this you can probably work out from the earlier parts of the course. But there are a couple of very specific things I want to go through. Design, first of all. If you need to get back into edit the data some more, you can click on Edit Data there and you can bring that spreadsheet of data back up, you can make changes if you need to; maybe add another river or if you find a mistake you can correct it. You can also click here if you want to change the chart type. It will maintain the data you’ve already entered but you can try a different chart. So for instance, if I wanted to change this to a column chart, what about a clustered column? Click on OK and my African River chart will now look like that. If I change the chart style or even if I stick with the original one, also on this Design tab, I have a choice of chart styles. So I can for instance change to that sort of style which looks pretty smart and I can even go in and change the colors that are

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Learn Word 2013 used within the chart. If I want to add something to a chart such as label an axis or add a legend explaining part of the chart, then I have Add chart element here which I can go through and add all sorts of features to charts. So it is a very flexible system. Let’s quickly have a look at the Format tab and there we have things like there’s WordArt again if I want to apply a bit of WordArt to the title for example. And we can also look at this pretty much just as a graphic where we want to say, well, do I want to be able to flow text around it? So hopefully that covers the main features of charting in Word 2013. What I’d like you to do now as an exercise is to take the last example you did and to draw a column chart showing the box office takings of your top five movies. If you didn’t get to the point of putting together your own top five movies, example-14 which is provided with the course will contain some data for you to work with. You won’t need everything in this table but obviously you’ll need the movie name and probably the box office takings will be useful as well. And my answer to this question is example-15. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 23 – Resume Video: Resume Reading and Editing Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this very short section, we’re going to look at one of the new features of Word 2013 and that’s Resume Reading. Now to be fair, it probably ought to be called Resume Reading or Resume Editing or maybe just Resume because the basic idea behind it is that if you’ve been reading a document or editing a document and maybe the documents several pages long, it gives you a way of quickly getting back to the point you were reading or editing before. Now I’m going to demonstrate using this tracking progress document that we’ve worked earlier on in the course. So let me scroll down a couple of pages down the document, maybe go to page three there and I’m just going to make a sort of dummy change to the document. So when I click on File, Close, it asks me if I want to save changes and I say Yes. Now what I’m going to do is to reopen the document. Now obviously there’s only a very short period of time elapsed here. So let’s go back to, get it from the top of the Recent Documents list, and what I get is that little message on the right. Now you’ve got to be quite quick to read that message on the right. But it actually leaves a bookmark and if you hover over the bookmark there, you can just see what the message says. Welcome back. Pick up where you left off. Scheduling and tracking fields a few seconds ago. So if I want to pick up where I left off, all I’ve got to do is click on that message and it takes me back to the point where I was editing before which is a very useful feature. And this doesn’t only apply when you’ve been editing a document. If you’ve for instance been in Read Mode, so you’re strictly just reading through a document, then the resume messages will appear in exactly the same way and you can go back to the point where you finished reading and carry on reading the document. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 24 – Read Mode Video: Object Zoom Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. Earlier on in the course, we looked at the new Read Mode in Word 2013 and one of the features of the new read mode that I didn’t cover there I’ve kept until here because it specifically relates to graphics and to tables, some of the things that we hadn’t covered earlier on in the course. So I’m going to return to that now and this feature is called Object Zoom. With object zoom if you’re in read mode and you want to get a close up view of something, then instead of zooming the whole screen, so going right in on the document, you can choose a particular object, something like a graphic or a chart or a bit of SmartArt and you can use object zoom to just zoom in on that one object. Now for this you need to be in the Column Layout Mode when you’re in read mode. So you may be turning pages using the arrows like this. But if you see an object you’d like a closer view of, say you want to take a closer view of that SmartArt Graphic that we created earlier. If you double click or double tap on that object, it’s enlarged. It’s enlarged. You only zoom in on that, the rest of the content although it’s shaded out is still there in its previous size. You normally will also see a little magnifier with a plus sign in the top right hand corner. If you tap on that, you can make the object bigger still and then return it to its original view size, its original zoom size just tap outside the object, and exactly the same approach would work with an image such as the picture we’ve got here, double tap, see a bigger view of the image, tap again to enlarge it again, and there’s the image at a much bigger size. Tap outside to revert to the original view. So that is object zoom in read mode in Word 2013. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 25 – Mail Merge Video: Mail Merge Wizard Part 1 Toby: Hello and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to take a look at Mail Merge. Now you’ve probably heard of mail merge before. You may even have done mail merges before. And it’s one of the main applications of Microsoft Word in many offices and businesses around the world. Now progressively over versions of Microsoft Word, the mail merge facilities have been considerably improved both in terms of how flexible and powerful they are and in terms of how easy they are to use. But it is still the case that many people manage to find the mail merge a pretty difficult thing to do and do get in quite a bit of trouble with it. Now from the point of view of showing you how to do a mail merge, what I’m going to aim to do here is to take you through one or two very straightforward examples and then I think it’s very important that you practice some of those basic ones before you try to do anything too complicated yourself. As you go into the more complex possibilities within mail merge and I will mention some of these briefly as we go along, the basic procedures, the basic principle still apply. So it’s important to understand the basics first before you try to do anything too complicated. So in this section, I’m going to do a full but straightforward mail merge. First of all, I’ve opened and empty blank document and click on Mailings and on the Mailings tab which we haven’t looked at so far, there are a number of groups and I want to quickly talk about those groups because to some extent they explain what a mail merge consists of. Basically, we can create various types of object to mail merge with. Let’s suppose you’ve got a list of customers and as part of your mail merge, you’re going to create an envelope for each customer to send a letter to. Well, this first group here, the Create Group, is a place where you can create envelopes. If you don’t use envelopes, if you’re doing something where you need to produce labels, then you’ve got an option here to create labels. Now in terms of actually starting the mail merge, that’s the button there. That’s the one we’re going to click at the moment. But before you really get started on the mail merge, you may want to setup a list of recipients. So again, let’s suppose you’ve got a list of customers that you’re

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Learn Word 2013 going to send a mail out to. Let’s also suppose that in some way you need to filter your standard list of clients. So perhaps you’re sending something out to clients who are generally interested a particular type of product. So that’s where you select your recipients. That’s how you get the mail merge started. This group in the middle, Write and insert fields, this is where we actually setup the fields in the document that we are going to merge. Now in order to explain this, I want to take a very simple example. Let’s suppose we’re going to just send a Happy New Year letter to all of our clients. All we really need to do in the letter is to put in the name of address of this client, probably a salutation like Dear Sir or Hello Jim or whatever it might be, and that’s pretty much it, but we want to write one letter and we’re going to mail it to hundreds or maybe thousands of clients and it’s going to look like a personal letter to each of those clients. Now those fields, that’s things like the salutation, the name of the client, and the lines of the address are what are called the Merge Fields and this is where we can control the fields. Now over here this group is the Preview Results Group. When we’ve setup the mail merge before, we actually run it to produce what may be hundreds or even thousands of letters or envelopes or labels, we want to preview it and make sure that it’s working okay. So that’s the preview area. And then right at the end we’ve got as you might expect a Finish Group. So this is basically where we sort of finish the job off. Now having said that for this first example, I’m going to do the whole thing using what’s called the Mail Merge Wizard. And if we take this through in the Wizard steps which basically reflect the outline I just gave when I talked about the groups on the Mailings Ribbon, then that will further explain how the whole of a mail merge works in a typical but straightforward case. So let’s start that mail merge. But before we do I’d just like to point out that I’ve not setup my recipients first. It’s often a good idea to setup the recipients first but we’ll come back to that later on. So click on Start mail merge and then the option right at the bottom is Step by step Mail Merge Wizard and this basically opens a Pane, normally on the right of the word Window here, and you can see at the bottom Step 1 of 6, and then there is in each of the six steps an explanation of what that step includes and very often there are options, there are other things to

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Learn Word 2013 do in order to get through each of the steps. Now in the first step, we have to select what type of document. Now I’ve already mentioned envelopes and labels but we might want to create email messages or we may want to create some kind of directory. Now I’m going to take a very straightforward letter here. I’m just going to do that Happy New Year letter that we talked about. Send letters to a group of people. You can personalize the letter that each person receives. Okay that’s fine. So I’m going to click on Next and I’m going to create a Happy New Year letter. Now the next step is where we decide what document we’re going to use, and there are basically three options. We can use the current document. So we could actually have our document ready to use. We can start from a template. Now if we use that option, then Word gives us access to a list of available mail merge templates.

And the third option is to start from an existing

document, and in this case we can look at any document. We can basically browse to find the document we want to use. Now on this occasion, I’m going to use the current document and I’m going to actually type in my Happy New Year message. Note what it says there. Use the current document. Start from the document shown here and use the Mail Merge Wizard to add recipient information. Now what I’m going to do and the reason I’m doing this will become apparent in a couple of minutes time. I’m just going to move down and just write some text in the middle. So what I’ve done there is to just type a very simple message. The staff of Acme wish you and your team a Happy New Year, etc. I’ve put Regards. I’ve put my name and my role there and I’ve left space at the top for two or three specific things. Now normally if I was doing this I’d probably have about five or six lines of address and I’d have a salutation like Dear John or Sir or whatever I might use and I might add various other things. But just to keep this one relatively straightforward, all I’m going to do is to put in the name of the recipient, the name of their company, and just say one line of their address and the salutation. So that’s just four things that I’m going to put on the upper part of this letter. At the moment, I’m leaving them out and we’ll come back to putting those in, in just a couple of minute’s time. So that’s Step 2 dealt with. I’m now going to move on to Step 3. Click on Next. Now in Step 3, we define the recipients and again there are three options here. And if you look at Select recipients in the Pane on the right, we can use an existing list. So if we’ve already created

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Learn Word 2013 a list of recipients, we can use that. There are various formats that that list can appear in and if you look at the text underneath, Use an existing list. It says Use names and addresses from a file or a database, and then there’s a Browse option there where you can select the source for the list of recipients. The second option is to select from your Outlook Contacts. I’m not going to use that option here because you’d see all my Outlook Contacts, but that’s a pretty great straightforward way of choosing the recipients of a mail merge document. What we’re going to do though is the third option which is to type a new list. Now when it comes to typing a new list it’s sometimes one of the areas where people get a little bit confused. So, type in your list, type the names and addresses of recipients and we click on this Create button to create a new recipient list. So click on Create. Now one of the things that I think sometimes can confuses people here is that you seem to have a list with a fixed number of fields in it. So we’ve got fields like title, first name, last name, and so on. Now in fact, this is really just a starting point and normally when you’re doing a mail merge, you’ll be customizing this list for your specific requirements. Now let me just start putting one person into the list just to show you how that works. So I’m going to put Ms., first name. We’re going to put Jane, last name, oh what about Doe? The company name is going to be Consolidated Metals. You can in fact adjust the width of the columns that we’re putting these into to make it a little bit easier to read. I’m going to put in address line 1, 236 Atlantic Boulevard. Now, I’m only going to use address line 1 for reasons that I said earlier on just to save a bit of time. So that’s all I’m going to use and the only other thing I need is a salutation. Now there is no field there for salutation so what I’m going to do is to customize the columns using this button here, Customize Columns. So first of all, let me get rid of the ones that I don’t want. I don’t want address line 2, so select that, click on delete. I don’t want city, delete. And what I do want is I want to add salutation; so click on Add, Salutation, click on OK. Now with the others, I’m going to delete the other ones that I don’t want and you can also use the move up and move down options to change the order of the fields. So I’m going to now correct that for this particular list of recipients and I’ll be with you in just a moment. So I think that list is now correct. I’ve got title, first name, last name, company name, just address line 1, and the salutation. Now of course, in reality I’d have all of the address lines there

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Learn Word 2013 if I was doing a full letter. So when I finish with that I just click on OK. Now, I’m going to go back now to Jane Doe and put in the salutation for Jane. So that’s going to be Dear Jane and my first recipient is setup. Now I’m going to setup four more recipients. So I’m going to click on New Entry. That gets me another person, type in the information for that person, and I’m going to do five of those and again join me in just a moment. So I’ve setup my five recipients. I’ve entered the fields for all of them. I’ve put in the appropriate salutation for each person and I just click on OK. I can save that list, then partly to use now in case I have to say break off and come back to this later on and partly as I may want to use the same list again in the future. Now by default, it has a Microsoft address list extension of .mdb. So I’m going to choose a location for that. I’m going to call it Demo 1.mdb and click on Save. Now that I have that recipient list setup, I can actually return to it at any time. You might just see on the right there, Edit recipient list. I can always come back to that now, customize it further, and then I can do things like sort it, filter it, find duplicates, and so on. So I’m finished with that for now, click on OK, and that’s the end of Step 3. So now let’s click here to go to Step 4. In Step 4 we actually setup the letter ready for the merge. So what we need to do here is to put all of those merge fields in. So we position the cursor where we want the first one to go and you think well we need to indicate there that it’s going to say Title which will be Mr. or Ms. or Miss. Now there are a couple of things that can make this a little bit quicker and easier for you and in the pane on the right one of the presets is a thing called Address Block. Now if I click on Address Block, I’ll explain what this does. This uses a pretty standard layout based on the standard fields for name and address, particularly in relation to business, and takes a sort of best guess at how you want this to look. Now you can adjust this sort of best guess using these check boxes on the left. But it will generally try to insert the recipient’s name in one of the standard formats. So in this case, it’s chosen that format. It’ll normally try to insert the company name if there is one. It’ll insert the postal address and it will format the address according to the destination country or region. Now it gives you a look at how this works for the first person in the recipient list. It’s going to say Ms. Jane Doe, Consolidated Metals, 236 Atlantic Boulevard. Well, that looks absolutely fine. That looks just how I need it. Now if it doesn’t come out the

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Learn Word 2013 way you want to, you may be able to correct whatever the problem is by choosing another one of these options. So for instance if you didn’t want it to say Ms. Jane Doe, you just want it to say Jane Doe, if you chose that option, it would just say Jane Doe. But let’s go back to that one. And also if the fields are not matching correctly, you can choose this Match Fields option here. But I’m actually pretty happy with that so I’m going to click on OK, and it’s put the address block into the letter. So that’s the first of my sets of merge fields. Now that’s pretty good actually because that’s done almost the whole job for me. But I’ve still got to put the salutation in and any field, any one of the potential merge fields can be placed anywhere. All you need to do is to click with the mouse where you want it to go or tap where you want it to go and More items gives you a list basically of everything that’s available, all of the fields that you’ve defined. So all I’m going to do is put in here Salutation and click on Insert. Click on Close. Now I should warn you that the spacing between these is something you need to be careful with because you probably want the letter to look balanced over the size of paper that you’re going to use. But it’s pretty straightforward to adjust that if you need to. You can delete or you can use the Enter key to put lines in. Let’s stick with that and hope that’s going to come out okay. You can always go back to the letter and make further adjustments later anyway. Everything’s looking good so far. Let’s click Next to go to Step 5 and in Step 5, we get to preview the letters and the very first one there, Ms. Jane Doe, Consolidated Metals, and so on. That looks absolutely fine; in fact, it even looks reasonably balanced. Now at this point, I’d probably want to print one of these letters, see what it looks like; maybe make any other corrections or changes. But that shows the basic processing of the Mail Merge Wizard. What I now need to do is to look at the end of the process and what we can do with the individual letters and look at some of the variations, some of the options that we looked at earlier on. So I’m going to cover that in the next section. I’ll see you then.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Mail Merge Wizard Part 2 Toby: Welcome back to mail merge in our course on Word 2013. In the previous section, we prepared a mail merge and we got right through to the point where we’re previewing the letters. This is the first of the five mail merge letters. And in this section, we’re going to look at how we finish off the mail merge, actually execute the mail merge, and then we’re going to look at two or three of the specific additional points, variations, and special cases that I mentioned in the first section. And the first thing we’re going to do now is to save the letter that we’ve used in case we have to come back and do some more work on it later and also to use it as a kind of model for future mail merge letters. So I’m going to save it as. I’m going to go into Computer, into the Example Files, and I’m going to save it as example-16. And in fact if you look in the list of files that came with this course that is example-16. Now having saved it, the name of course appears at the top. Let’s get back to this previewing. Now when it comes to previewing letters, it’s pretty straightforward case of just stepping through them. So we’ve got controls here on the right. Note also and particularly this is true when you get towards the end of a mail merge, almost all of the commands in the groups on the Mailings Tab are now available and you can use those, for instance to step through recipients. Let’s go to recipient 2, just click on the right arrow there, Mr. Peter Stanley, Dear Pete, that’s fine. Dr. Emelia Sanchez, Dear Dr. Sanchez, yeah that’s fine. You may want to step through them all individually. You may think that a particular recipient may have caused a problem and you’ve got a Find a recipient option there. You can look for a particular person in the list. You can also if you see a particular letter and think, ah, I didn’t mean to send them that or that’s really gone completely wrong. You can click on Exclude this recipient to remove one of the recipients from the list. So this really is your opportunity to fine tune the list and also, of course, you may see an error in the letter that means you’ve got to go back and edit the letter and go through some of the earlier processes again. But I’m going to assume here for the moment that everything else has gone okay and I’m going to go down to Next, Complete the merge.

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Learn Word 2013 Now this last step is also one that sometimes causes a little bit of confusion, so let me explain this in a little bit of detail. The mail merge hasn’t actually happened yet but we’re pretty much ready for it and there are really two options. Now if you click on Print which basically says Merge to printer, what will happen is it will, by default, just print all of the letters; so it merges them all to the printer, prints them all. You can if you want just merge the current record or you could select a range and given that we’ve got five letters, I could say one to four or three to five or something like that. So that’s the basic way of printing the letters. If on the other hand you want to look at the individual letters after the merge, this is where you use the second option, Edit individual letters, and again you can do all the current record or a range. So why would you want to do this? Well, let’s suppose that you’re completely happy with the basic letter that you’ve done and you’ve generated in my case five letters or maybe 500 or 5,000, but you want to be able to go through and find two or three individual people where you want to maybe add a little extra note; you want to write something different to them. Now, of course, we could’ve excluded them from the recipient list and written them a separate letter, but this is a good alternative. It means you can go through and maybe add something or even remove something from individual letters.

When you’ve finished processing one or more

individual letters, you can then just print the whole lot because they’re all contained in one document with a whole load of letters in it. So that’s basically how you complete the mail merge. And when you’ve done your print or you’ve created that file that you’re going to go away and edit to do a bit of individual editing and customizing of letters, all you need to do is to close the Mail Merge Wizard and it’s done. You can then close the file we’ve been working on, click on Save, and we’re all done. So having successfully completed one mail merge, let’s have a look at some of the options related to mail merge, including one or two of the things that I mentioned earlier on. I’ve started the Mail Merge Wizard again and this time I’m going to go into Step 2 from Step 1. One of the question there, How do you want to setup your letters? Use the current document. That’s what we did last time. We typed in the content and then later on put in the merge fields, but what

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Learn Word 2013 about start from a template? Now if you want to start from a template, there are a number of templates available with Word 2013 and many of those are mail merge templates. So let’s take a quick look at how we would do that. First of all, click on Select Template. Now Select Template gives access to templates that are available locally on the device. We’re going to look at templates on Office.com. So I’m going to press this button down here, Templates on Office.com.

Now when you do this, you may not quite see the same as this because

Microsoft.com does change quite a bit. The pages are replaced and refreshed on a fairly regular basis. But when you get into the area of Office Templates, you need to go to Word, so I click on Word first, and then I also have a Search box, Search for Word Templates. What I’m going to do is to search for mail merge templates. So I type in Mail Merge, hit the magnifier, and it comes up with a number of mail merge letter templates. There are quite a few of these templates. You can see on the left quite a long list of them: Letters, Print, Stationary. Let’s stick with a letter. Let’s go for this particular letter, the Equity theme letter. And we can see the rating. Click on download. I have quite a lot of security on the internet here so I have to allow pop-up blocker. You may have a similar thing on your device. So we’ll just give it a time to get past that, to actually download again for some reason, but eventually I will get that letter. So there we are. I go into Mailings and I’ve got my document. I could actually go through now, same procedure that we used before and setup my mail merge. Now on this particular letter has got a couple of interesting things about it. First of all, I’m just I’m just going to zoom in on this part of the letter. The items in the letter that are between the double angle brackets are basically the merge fields. So what you have here, Greeting line, that will be a merge field. And when you want to setup your data you would need a data item whose name was Greeting line. Address block would pretty much work the same way that address block worked in the previous example, in the last section. The items that are between square brackets are what are called Form Fields. We’ve seen these before. I’ve referred to them as form fields or placeholders. But the difference between them is that these form fields are effectively the things that you are going to enter as a fixed part of your letter. So for instance, I might put today’s date in here and that’s it for this letter. It’s effectively then a fixed part of data in this letter. It is not one of the merge fields. Similarly, if I wanted to put the company name in

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Learn Word 2013 here that again is a fixed part of the letter. And I can put my sender address there as well. Similarly towards the bottom of the letter I’ve got other fields to fill in. Notice that when I filled in Acme Engineering Inc. as a form field, it appeared at the bottom as well. So if you’re using one of these templates letters, you’d need to fill in those form fields yourself and then what remains, the merge fields, the one in the angle brackets are the ones that you’ll setup in the merge. So let’s see how we could set about merging with this particular template. Well, I’ve setup my document. I filled in all those form fields. I’ve got the merge fields left, just those two sets of merge fields. I don’t really need to use the Wizard now. I’m going to go to the Select Recipients button first and it says, Type a new list, Use an existing list, or Choose from Outlook Contacts. I’m going to use an existing list and what I’m going to do is use the list that we created in the last section and just to help you, there it is, Demo 1.mdb, but I’ve also put the list that we created earlier into the standard folder for the example files and it’s included with the files you got in the course. It’s example-16.mdb. So double click or open that one. So let’s just confirm that. Go into Edit recipient list. There’s the list of people. Don’t worry too much if the order has changed or the order of the fields has changed, Word 2013 does certain things to these lists itself. You can change the sort order anyway if you want to. But there’s the list. If you didn’t want to use all of these people, you could use the check boxes here to eliminate some of the recipients from the current mail merge. But there are the mail merge recipients. The only real issue I’m going to have here, as you may have guessed, is that when I created this list, I called the field here Salutation rather than Greeting line. A couple of ways around that; I could either create a new field and copy these values into it, but I could just change the merge field in the document and that’s going to be the easiest way to do it. So I’m happy with the recipient list. I’m going to select the Greeting line. I’m going to press the Delete key and then I’m going to insert a new field. Note up here that I’ve got a command button, Insert Merge Field. The one I’m going to put in is Salutation. I may choose, for instance, to make that bold. So I can make that bold, and now let me just preview the result. So click on preview results, and there we have the first merge done. It’s to Jane Doe. I can review all of that letter. I could perhaps just zoom out a little, see a little more of it, scroll down, see the closing part, and then I can step through

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Learn Word 2013 the recipients, check each of those, and all of the finishing merge options like printing, merging to a file, and so on, all of that is still available to me. So in that second example we’ve pretty much done everything manually and this leads us to the next exercise for you to do because I would like you to use that same letter template. It doesn’t really matter if you want to use a different letter, but you’ve seen that one now and you have some idea of what goes where. You can either use example-16.mdb in the file with those five people in it or better still create your own recipient list, and I’d like you to do a mail merge with that letter and at least five recipients. My version of the saved output of that mail merge is example-17. When you open example-17, you’ll see that it’s got five full letters in it and you’re equivalent output, depending on what letter you choose, what recipient list you choose, and so on should have at least five pages of output as well. Okay that’s it on mail merge. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Chapter 26 – Collaboration, Reviewing and Sharing Video: Send to Email; Post to Blog; SkyDrive; Invite People Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to start looking at Sharing and in particular we’re going to look at sharing on SkyDrive. So the first thing I need to do is to explain what I mean by sharing. Now I’m going to explain sharing in terms of, say, this particular document I’ve been working on. It’s a four page document. It’s a technical document about tracking progress for project managers. If I go to Backstage View by clicking on the File tab, one of the options there is Share and that presents to me some of the options for sharing a document. Now one traditional option for sharing a document is email and what I can do in that case is I’ve got that particular document about tracking progress. I could email it to other people. The email options are shown here. I could send it as an attachment to an email, send it as a PDF, send it as an XPS or send it as an internet fax. That’s one of the most popular ways of sharing documents. You send a document to somebody. Sometimes all you want them to do is to read it. Sometimes you want them to do some work on it. You might, for instance, have written the document and you want them to edit it and markup any comments they have. That’s something we’ll come back to later. The key thing though is that they’re getting an electronic version of the document. You may or may not want them to edit themselves. Now let’s look at the present online option. This is one where we present the document to people who can watch in a web browser. And typically this kind of reviewing of a document online, something that can form part of an event that’s often called a webinar, for example, gives you the opportunity to work through the document, to talk about it online to other people, and typically what will happen is that once you’ve presented it to people, you will make it available for them to download and probably read a copy themselves afterwards, possibly even markup comments in that situation as well. One of the other sharing options is to post the document to a blog. Now many of the most popular blogging systems such as WordPress, Blogger, the SharePoint Blogging, and so on all

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Learn Word 2013 support documents created in Word and posted as blogs and that’s another good sharing option. In that situation you tend not to be talking about sharing the document with other people from the point of view of them editing it, but you may well have a situation where people can comment on it outside of the document itself. Now there is another approach to sharing which certainly as far as business is concerned, there’s traditionally been the most important one and that is where a number of people have access to a document simultaneously. They may not all be able to open it simultaneously and even if they can open it simultaneously, they may not all be able to change it simultaneously, but that’s by making the document available on a network. So in a work situation, typically you may have a server computer or a storage device that different people can access with a document on it and people subject to the permissions they have, the security of the document, whatever the constraints are depending on the business. People may be able to access the same document. It may well be if one person opens it to change it other people can’t see it while it’s open for change. But these will be local constraints and local restrictions and rules that will vary from place to place. The general principle is the document is in a location that many people can see. Now the current or I should say newer approach to that is to give that access on a network that we usually now refer to as the Cloud and, in the case of Microsoft, the Cloud is effectively epitomized by the use of SkyDrive. Now when you buy a copy of Microsoft Office nowadays, you automatically get a certain amount of storage space on SkyDrive, you get your own SkyDrive space and you can treat this SkyDrive space as though it was just part of your own computer. You can put files there. Now one obvious reason for putting files on SkyDrive or in the Cloud is that it then becomes very straightforward to let other people have access to those files. You can even, as we’ll see in a little while, allow people to edit those files. So you can put a file on to SkyDrive, tell somebody else it’s there, and say why don’t you do a bit of editing? Why don’t you add some content to it? Or maybe just review this section and tell me what you think. Now that process of saving on SkyDrive is not really any more complicated than saving a file on a local computer, subject to getting the SkyDrive account setup and obviously making sure that

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Learn Word 2013 you’ve got security covered. And we’re going to look at those two aspects in just a moment, getting the SkyDrive setup and then looking at security issues. Just before we do, let’s just look at this top option under Share here, which is Invite people, because that pretty much summarizes what you need to do. Invite people, Step 1, Save your document to a SkyDrive location; Step 2, Share your document. We’ll do this after you’ve finished saving. So save the document then share it with other people. So here I am back at my document. This is tracking progress 3. Click on File. Now I’m going to File, Save As, and this time I’m going to save to Toby’s SkyDrive. Now I already have my SkyDrive setup with a number of files already stored on it. I’ve got some pictures on it, one or two other documents as well. If you don’t already have SkyDrive yourself, then you’re going to need to set it up. Now in order to do that you need to have a Microsoft account. If you’ve got one of the old Hotmail accounts or a Live account, you’re going to be able to use that. But what happens if you haven’t got SkyDrive setup is that instead of a Browse button here, you get a Sign in button and you sign in to SkyDrive. You can stay signed in from the device you’re using if you want to and then it’ll appear in the same way that mine says Toby SkyDrive, whatever name you’ve used will appear as part of the name of your SkyDrive and from that time onwards it basically works as though it was a storage folder on your own device. So when it comes to saving to SkyDrive it is pretty much like any other storage folder. I can browse, first of all, to what will be the top level folder, the Home folder on SkyDrive and I can see here that on my SkyDrive I’ve got two folders setup already. I’ve got one called Australia and another one called Documents. That’s a rather unimaginative title. So I’m going to go into the Documents folder. Nothing in there at the moment so click on Save and that document is now saved on SkyDrive. Now the significance of having that saved on SkyDrive will become apparent over the next two or three minutes. Now I’ve closed down Microsoft Word 2013 and I’m now using Internet Explorer and I’ve browsed to Live.com, and in Live.com I’m going to login with my Live account, put my user name and password in, in the usual way. Bear in mind that in order for you to use SkyDrive, you must have already created a Microsoft account and I’m going to enter my credentials and then

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Learn Word 2013 I’ll sign in. Now once I’ve signed in, one of the options within my Microsoft account is SkyDrive. So I go to SkyDrive. I can see that I’ve got a couple of Excel workbooks there that, of course, wouldn’t show up when I was saving a Word document. But I can also see my folders, Australia and Documents.

So I’ll click on the Documents folder and within the

Documents folder, of course, I see my file, MS Project Tracking Progress 3. So it’s good to know that my file is safely saved on SkyDrive. But, of course, the implications of this are greater than just the fact that I’ve got a copy on SkyDrive. First of all, I could access this document from anywhere in the world. It’s on a local PC. Even if I’d left my laptop at home or had my laptop stolen or had it stored on some sort of storage device at home, this is stored somewhere that can be accessed pretty much from anywhere. And on top of that, I could access it from all kinds of different device and that’s the first great advantage of storing in the Cloud or, in Microsoft’s case, on SkyDrive. You’ve got something stored somewhere where you can pretty much access it from anywhere. Now let’s look at the second big advantage of using SkyDrive. Supposing, I want to take a look at that document but I haven’t actually got Word 2013 on the device that I’ve got available to me. How can I look at Word documents if I haven’t got Word? Well the answer to that is if you’ve got SkyDrive, you can because along with that you get access to the Word Web App and the Word Web App will give you not quite the same full functionality as a desktop based copy of Word 2013, but it’ll give you an awful lot of what you might need to read and edit a document. Now I’m not going to go in the details here of what you can and can’t do in the web app. You can look that up online. But let’s just see what it looks like in relation to this particular document. So let me just click on that document, the Word Web App opens, and there we are. We can see our document in the Word Web App. That is not running Word 2013 on the PC that I’m recording this course on. This is running the web app over the internet. This also means that colleagues you may want to share this document with who don’t have Word 2013 installed can also look at this document provided they have access to it on your SkyDrive. And that brings us to the third main advantage of using SkyDrive and that is it enables us to share this document in a way that other people can actually work on it. Now if you click on

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Learn Word 2013 Share on this little menu system here, you get some share options. You share this with people by their email address and you can send an email to somebody, put their name in there, include a personal message. Hi Jim, Here’s that document I want you to read for me. If you want the recipient or recipients of the message to be able to edit, you use this check box here. If you don’t check, it means that person can only read the document. And you can share either by sending an email, you can post it using Facebook, LinkedIn, etc. and you can also get a link that you could email to people separately. So you could get a URL to send to them. You can put more than one name in the list here but, of course, make sure you don’t mix people who can only read with people you’re giving permission to edit. When you’ve setup the people you want to be able to read or edit the document, put in any messages, click on the Share button, and those people will get the message with the link and they’ll be able to read or if you’ve specified it, edit that document. So now I’m back in Word 2013 looking at the copy of the document that’s shared on SkyDrive. Let’s go back into Backstage View and look at a couple of important things there. And first of all, if you go down to Share look at the change that’s happened now in Share for this document because it’s showing some extra options that we didn’t have before. For instance, we have an option here to post to social networks. Now that that’s in a shared location, we can actually post it on social networks if we want to. Get a sharing link enables us to get a link that we can either send to other people or use in any way you like; it’s just a straightforward URL. And when we go to Invite people, we have pretty much the same facilities that we had from the internet when we were logged into my Live.com account in terms of sharing the SkyDrive version of the document with other people. So we’ve got a little drop down here, Can edit, Can view. We can put in the email addresses of people. We can put the personal message in and so on. So a number of these are enabled purely by the fact that the document is now on SkyDrive and available for sharing. And if you look at the email option here, we’ve also got a send a link option where we can send that link to the document to other people. So you can see how much is opened up by having the document available on SkyDrive. So that’s pretty much it for using SkyDrive for saving and sharing documents and a little bit of an introduction to the Word Web App. It’s not really a case now of giving you a specific

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Learn Word 2013 example to do here, but if you don’t already have SkyDrive setup, I suggest you set it up unless you’ve got a good reason not to and maybe just save one of your documents to it as an experiment and just to make sure that you understand how it works. That’s it for this section. I’ll see you in the next one.

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Learn Word 2013

Video: Restrict Editing, Comments, Simple Markup and Tracking Changes Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In the previous section, we looked at sharing and SkyDrive and in that section, I talked specifically about how people could access a shared document. So there are various scenarios. One of them is that the document is available on a network, a local business network where different people can access the same document. Another situation is one where we share it using SkyDrive. It’s also possible to send a document say by email to somebody, let them markup changes or comment, send it back to you. That’s a method of working collaboratively on a document that’s been around for a very long time. Now when you’re working on a document collaboratively, no matter what approach you’re using, no matter whether you’re sharing the document in situ or you’re sending it around, there are various tools available in Word 2013 for you to markup changes, to make comments, to indicate sections that you might think should be deleted or indeed to delete sections in such a way that somebody can see that you’ve deleted them or at least propose deleting them. And in this section, I’m going to give you a quick overview of those tools, the situations in which you might each of them, basically how they work. And just before I do that, this particular document is the one that we saved on SkyDrive earlier so it’s actually available on SkyDrive to a selected named group people. And what I can do is to indicate what can and cannot be done to this document. Now if I go to the Review tab, there’s a group there called Protect and with the group one of the options is Block Authors. This is a function designed for a document that’s saved on SharePoint where you can actually select a section of the document and block other people from working on either all the time or for a period of time, and then there’s an option to unblock it again. But the one I’m particularly interested in here is Restrict editing. So with this document open, I click on Restrict editing, that brings up the Restrict Editing Pane on the right and from there I can define what other people are allowed to do to this document. Now I’m not going to go through this in a lot of detail now but it’s important to know you can do this. For instance, item two, editing restrictions; allow only this type of editing in the document. If I check editing restrictions, I can then select what sort of editing people can do. At the moment no changes, read

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Learn Word 2013 only. I could for instance say that people are allowed to make comments but all they can do is make comments, and then I can define exceptions to that. When I’ve setup my restrictions, I have an option at the bottom to start the enforcement of those restrictions. So if you want to be able to limit what people can do to a particular document, this is the function to look at, Restrict Editing, and you need to set that up for a document where you do want to restrict what other people can do to it. Now the tool that’s probably the simplest to use when you’re reviewing a document is the highlighter pen. It’s on the Home tab in the Font Group. It’s this tool here. You see a little splash of color in the middle of it. That’s the current highlighting color and the highlighting is currently disabled on this document. That tool is not marked as enabled. If I click on it, it enables the tool. You can see the darker color, and the color you can see at the moment is yellow. So as I move the cursor over some text, it changes to a pen. I could select a section of text and it gets highlighted exactly the same way that a highlight pen would work physically on a piece of paper. If I want to change the highlighting color, I could perhaps go for this green color here. Let’s choose some more text, highlight that, and that’s basically how the highlighter works. At any time if you want to switch the highlighter off, so you just click the button again, it’s disabled. And if you want to remove highlighting that you’ve previously applied, just select the text, click on the side of the button and say No Color, and the highlighting is gone. The next tool I’d like to look at is the use of comments. Now let’s suppose I’m reading this document, I get to the second paragraph here, and the middle sentence “You should ensure the information you are processing is good.” Now perhaps I’m reading this and I want to say to the author, well, how do you do that? Rather than just highlighting which would just highlight that, there is an issue and not say what the issue is, I can insert a comment. Now if you go the Review tab again, there’s a whole section on comments and we start off with New Comment. Now that links me to a section at the side. It identifies who has made the comment, that’s me. It identifies when the comment was made and I can just type my comment in. Having finished that, I can type some more, I can go back to the document. My comment is there for other people to read. Now let me just zoom out so we can see that a little bit better and there we can see the comment appearing along the side of the document. Now if it’s somebody else’s document I’m reviewing,

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Learn Word 2013 they can go through and they can look at that comment and decide what they want to do about it if anything. Now let’s suppose that I’m the author of this document. I’ve got it back from somebody who’s been reviewing on it. I want to look at the comments they’ve made. You can see a little icon on the right there which indicates that there is a comment. If I click on Show Comments in the Comments Group, I’ll actually see the comments appear in a little bit more detail with the text of the comments there as well. But let’s suppose I’m starting from the start of the document and seeing what the comments are. I can step through the comments using Next and Previous. So for instance, I could say Next; that takes me to that comment. I could actually comment back. I could say something else about that, put my own comment in if you like. Or if I’ve say phoned Toby up and say let me explain this to you, then I can remove this comment. I just click no delete and that comment has gone. So what we’ve looked at so far doesn’t involve making changes to a document, it involves either just highlighting part of it or making a comment on part of it. What about making changes? Well, one of the long established and most important features of Word in terms of collaboration is Change Tracking. And with change tracking, basically what happens is you switch change tracking on and Word keeps track of all of the changes that are made in the document in terms of additions, deletions, moving things around, making formatting changes, and so on. And not only does it keep track of those but it keeps track of who made them and it gives you the ability as say the author or somebody responsible for a document to accept or reject changes that other people have made. So let’s see how change tracking works. Well, the first thing we need to do is to switch change tracking on. It’s on the Review tab in the Tracking Group, there is a button that says Track Changes. You can switch on or off with that button. At the bottom, there’s a little drop down arrow and you can actually lock the tracking. So you can enforce it to be kept on. One of the reasons for doing this, of course, is to stop other people removing the facility to track their changes. But for the moment, let’s just track changes by clicking there to enable change tracking. And now let me suppose that I want to remove this statement, “Be warned with an exclamation mark at the beginning of that line.” I’m going to put

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Learn Word 2013 the cursor to the right of it. I’m just going to get rid of it and a couple of things happen. Mainly in the background but I also see a little red mark here and the red mark on the left here indicates that there is a change there and it tells you what sort of change it is. So now let me make another change to this document. This time I’m going to type before the word It in the second paragraph there some more text. So I’ve now inserted some text and note also the bar on the side to indicate a change. When I’m looking at this document at the moment, I can see that three things have been done to it. And what I’m looking at is the document in a view; this is a new feature of Word 2013. I’m using a view called Simple Markup View and if you look in the Tracking Group, there’s a control up here that says Simple Markup and what this basically shows you is where things are and to some extent what sort of things they are. So for instance, you can tell that’s a comment on the right because it’s got a speech bubble without actually showing what the changes are. There are alternatives to Simple Markup View and one alternative is All Markup. Now with All Markup, I can see what changes have been made. If I scroll across to the right, I can see that comment. If I look in the body of the document, I can see “Be warned!” strike through or struck through, and then I can also see here the newly inserted text underlined to show that it’s newly inserted text. The alternative to showing All Markup is to show No Markup, and then you see no sign of the changes or the comment. So the idea of Simple Markup View is to show you where there are changes or comments in a document. The full markup shows you exactly what they are. Now let’s suppose that you’ve sent a document out for review and somebody sent it back to you like this. There are some marks, there are some comments, and you want to go through it and consider all of the things that have been done to a document or indicated on your document. If you go to the beginning of the document, you can step through the changes. There’s a group here on the Review tab, Changes, and you can step through the changes one at a time. And you have a button here that says Accept; Accept and move to next if you accept a particular change and move to next. You can just say Accept all changes or you can say Accept all changes and stop tracking. This will deal with changes, so that’s deletions and insertions, not comments. If you want to reject a particular change, there’s another button at the top here which says Reject

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Learn Word 2013 and move to next or Reject all changes or Reject all changes and stop tracking.

So

conventionally this set of controls is the one that people have used to go through and review proposed changes to a document. There is another tool that can help here and it’s called the Reviewing Pane and there’s a control just bottom right of the Tracking Group. You can either have the Reviewing Pane vertical or horizontal. I’m going to put it on vertical at the moment and this gives a list of revisions and comments. And for any one of them, if you say look at the first one Toby deleted “Be warned!”, you want to go to that. Let’s put the full markup on so we can see what it actually is. Click on that, that’s the first change. If you right click on that one, you have an option there of saying Accept deletion, Reject deletion. Let’s say that one I’m going to reject it. I don’t really want to remove that “Be warned!” so I reject the deletion and as you can see “Be warned!” is restored and is no longer marked as change marked. Let’s go to the next on, Toby’s comment. I could at that point say delete the comment, right click on there. It’s got reply to comment, delete comment, mark comment. Reply to comment I make to say something like, I’ll phone you and you could perhaps send that back to Toby so he could see what the response was. Obviously, I’m both Toby’s in this case. And then if I go to this one, that particular change “This can only be achieved”, that one I might say okay I’m going to accept that insertion, and so on. So you can go through, you can review all of the proposed changes, all of the insertions, and so on and you finish up with a document that you’re happy with or that you are ready to progress to the next stage. Now that pretty much covers in overview form at least the options for collaborating and reviewing. I have omitted Inking which is a really specialist technique which is used with a stylus typically on some sort of touch screen device, tablet device. That’s outside the scope of this course. And also on the Review tab, there are things like translation which not strictly speaking a reviewing technique, but again that’s outside the scope of this course. But they’re good things to look into. Also, of course, in terms of tracking and comments there’s plenty more things for you to experiment with yourself. And particularly with tracking a lot of it depends on a sort of local protocol working with your colleagues as to how you approach change tracking. But that’s it on collaboration and reviewing tools. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 27 – Long Documents Video: Navigation, Headings, Table of Contents, Update Page Numbers and Outline View Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, we’re going to look at some of the main aspects of dealing with long documents. The document we’re going to use as an example is just under 20 pages long, so it’s not particularly long, but we can use it to demonstrate all of the main features and tools that you might need when you’re dealing with a long document. So let’s get started. Now as is often the case with long documents, this one’s got quite a bit of technical content on it. It’s about computer databases actually. It’s quite an old document but it’s still relevant today. And one of the most important things about long documents, in fact the way that virtually everybody approaches long documents is that they structure a document using styles. Now we’ve dealt with styles already earlier in the course. If I take one of the early pages of this document, let’s say here, and click on the very heavily bold word there Objectives. Go to the Home tab, I can see that it’s Heading style 1. And in fact, the main sections of this document are all begun with a Heading style 1 entry. So that one, Designing a Database is also Heading style 1. Now within that there are various lower level parts of the document that are marked as Heading level 2. So if I move further down here, Designing your Table, that’s a Heading 2 style, and it’s the use of those styles that gives the document its structure. Earlier on in the course, we looked at the Navigation Pane and I’d like to look at the Navigation Pane again now. So if we click on View and enable Navigation Pane in the Show Group, the Navigation Pane appears on the left and one of the three options which we looked at earlier on but we couldn’t actually use earlier on was Headings. And you can see now how the headings of this particular document work. The Heading level 1’s are the left most ones in the list and the Heading level 2’s are indented one level from there. So this on, Online Help, must be a Heading level 2. Designing your Table, that’s Heading level 2 as well. Now, within that there are then some Heading level 3’s; so we’ve got Fields, Field Sizes, Field Types. So you can see in this summary how the structure of the document works.

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Learn Word 2013 This also shows you how you can use the Navigation Pane to navigate around this long document because if I click on one of the headings, I can go straight to that point in the document. So for instance, if I wanted to go to Getting Reports, I go down to the Navigation Pane and click on Getting Reports, it takes me there in the document. If I wanted to go to Fields within Designing your Table, I click on Fields and it takes me there. Note by the way that if I click on Fields in the actual text of the document, go to the Home tab, I can see that it is a Heading 3 styled paragraph. I know it’s only one line but it’s still a paragraph and it’s Heading 3 styled. Now when you’re navigating your way around a document, particularly a very long document using the Navigation Pane and the styles, you may have literally hundreds of headings of various levels shown in the Navigation Pane and it’s often very useful to be able to collapse those headings so that you can see more. So for instance here in Creating a Simple Database, I’ve got two Heading level 2’s. Each of the Heading level 2’s has got some Heading level 3’s. I could collapse either of the Heading 2’s to make myself a little bit more space in the Navigation Pane or in fact, I could collapse the whole of Creating a Simple Database and just show the Heading level 1. The fact that there is a little arrow, a little wedge next to it tells me that there’s some other heading levels within that Heading level 1 and I can investigate that further if I need to. Now I’d like to demonstrate something else here alongside this. This is another one of the new features in Word 2013 and it’s not strictly to do with the Navigation Pane, but it very closely mirrors what we’ve just seen. Within the body of a document if you hover over one of the headings, you’ll see a little wedge, a little arrow there, and you can actually collapse a Heading level section of a document here just by clicking on that arrow, and this hides the content. Of course, it doesn’t delete anything and anybody who wants to see that content again would just click on the wedge, click on the arrow again. But it’s very useful when you’re looking at a very long document and you just want to focus on one part. You can even use this approach when you ask other people to review the document. You can basically collapse the parts you don’t particularly want them to read and just leave expanded the parts you do.

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Learn Word 2013 If you right click on a heading, you have as one of the menu options on the contextual menu Expand/Collapse and from Expand/Collapse, you can say expand heading if it’s collapsed or collapse heading if it’s expanded. You can also say expand all headings or collapse all headings. This is within the document itself. This is not in the Navigation Pane. So that’s a great way when you’re dealing with a long document of collapsing the bits you’re not particularly interested in at the moment and it can make the whole of a very long document seem a bit less daunting if you can have most of it collapsed and just see the bit you’re working on at the moment. As I say that’s one of the new features in Word 2013. Now one thing you may want to do when you’re working with a long document is to number the sections of the document, maybe just number the chapter or number the sections within the chapters. Let’s suppose for a very straightforward example of this I just decide I want to number these chapters. There’s a very straightforward way of doing this in Word 2013. All you need to do is to go to the Styles Group on the Home tab, and within that if you right click on Heading 1 which is basically the style that’s used on the Heading level 1’s, one of the option there is modify. Click on modify. You get up with this modify style where you can change all sorts of things about this particular style. The one we’re going to change is the numbering system. So if I just click on the bottom here where it says format, one of the options there is numbering. At the moment, there is no numbering. It says None. All I’m going to do is to put numbers on each chapter, 1, 2, 3, with a full stop with a point. Click on OK, click on OK, and now you notice that Headings level 1 now has a style which includes the number of the chapter at the beginning. Now, of course, if you scroll through the document, you’ll see that those numbers have been applied to the name of every chapter where it begins. And also, of course, if you look in the Navigation Pane, you can see that the numbering has appeared on the Navigation Pane. Now in many situations, you may want to number at a lower level as well. So if you take Chapter 6, Creating a Simple Database, you may want it to say 6.1 Designing your Table, 6.2 Setting Up your Table, and maybe even at the lower level 6.1.1 Fields and so on. Now to do this, you use pretty much the same approach we’ve just made in principle, but it gets a bit more complicated when you’re working at the lower levels and the recommended way of doing this with Word if you access the Word Help it explains this to you in quite a lot of detail. It’s not a

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Learn Word 2013 very straightforward procedure to be honest with you, but you basically use a multilevel list as here, as we used for multilevel lists earlier on, but linked to the heading numbers. So in the styles here, Heading 2 would say 1.1 double-A, double-B. But as I say, the Word Help gives you a link through to a community help section that explains to you how to do that. So we’ve now got our chapter numbers numbered and the next thing I’d like to look at, in fact the last main thing in relation to a long document is how to put a table of contents in. So I’m going to close the Navigation Pane and I’m going to decide where I want my table of contents to go. I’m going to put it here, just partway down the first page under the sort of heading. Then go to the References tab. One of the options on the References tab is Table of Contents. Click on Table of Contents and I’m presented with some options for automatic layouts for Table of Content. You can see the different layout styles there. I’m going to go for, I think, the first one. Note that there are some options down at the bottom to do custom Table of Contents and also, of course, to remove a Table of Contents if you’ve previously put one in and want to remove it again. But on this occasion, I’m just going to go for the first one, click on there, and let me just scroll back up again, and there is my Table of Contents. Now at any time that I’m working on the document, particularly if I’m working on a long document for a long time, I may need to update the Table of Contents. I may be putting pages in, taking pages out, putting whole chapters in and taking them out. So if you right click on the Table of Contents, one of the options you have is to update and if you click on Update, it says Update Table of Contents. It gives you the option of either updating just the page numbers. So if you haven’t changed any chapters, you just want to update the page numbers you can do that. But if you want to update the entire table, that’s remake the whole thing you choose the second option.

Now with modern computers and unless you’ve got a really huge document, it’s

probably always best to update the entire table, but if you know for a certain that you haven’t actually added or taken any sections out, just updating page numbers only is fine. Now if I want to customize the Table of Contents, let me go back to that menu that we saw just now, Table of Contents, click on Custom. And for instance, at the moment I’ve got down to level 3 in the Table of Contents. Supposing I just want the chapters themselves, I can change it

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Learn Word 2013 to show levels just down to 1, click on OK. Do you want to replace the selected Table of Contents? OK and now all I’ve got is the chapters themselves. Now one other useful thing to point out here is that the Table of Contents is not just intended as a Table of Contents if you like for a paper document. Each of the entries in the Table of Contents is, in fact, a link and if you hold down the Control key and click on one of the entries in the Table of Contents, suppose I click on Create a Simple Database, it takes me to that point in the document and that is how the Table of Contents is intended to be used in an electronic version of a document. So there’s just a couple of other things now while we’re talking about long documents. One of the things we talked about very, very early on in the course was the types of view that are available, and one of the types of view that mentioned but I couldn’t show you then was Outline View. So if you go to the View tab in the Views Group, Outline View will actually show you a document in terms of its structure and its headings and so on. And it’s a bit like the Expand and Collapse feature that’s been introduced in Word 2013, a more traditional version of that. It’s also a specific view as well. So you close that Outline View when you finished with it. But what it enables you to do, it enables you to control the level at which you’re looking at the overall structure of a document. So for instance, when I’m looking at this Chapter 6 here, if I click on minus it actually collapses that down to just show me the headings within that chapter. Click on one of the headings within the chapter, click on minus, it collapses that down as well. So within the document rather than using the Navigation Pane, you can expand and collapse various parts of the document so that you can concentrate on reading or reviewing a particular that you’re interested in. So that’s Outline View and we close it from here. So that’s it on long documents.

I mentioned towards the beginning of this section about

technical documents. There are various things you can help with technical documents such as the use of a Thesaurus and various research tools. There are also additional things you can generally use in long documents. For instance, you can insert a cover page. You can also insert an index and then add terms to that index. You also have things like endnotes, footnotes, and so

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Learn Word 2013 on. These are all outside the scope of this course but well worth looking into, particularly if you deal with long and/or technical documents. So that’s it in this section. I’ll see you in the next one.

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Chapter 28 – Desktop Publishing Video: Watermarks Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. When the early versions of Microsoft Word appeared, there were also software packages around called Desktop Publishing packages and some of those packages are still around today. But over the intervening years, Microsoft Word itself has extended more and more into the field of desktop publishing. Put very simply a desktop publishing package really handles the whole preparation of a document for publishing. Well nowadays Microsoft Word can do just about everything you need to produce a publishable document either online or in paper form. And in this section and the next section, both of which are very short sections, I’m going to show you a couple of the features of Microsoft Word that are more in the realms of desktop publishing than anything else. In this section we’re going to look at putting Watermarks on pages, and then in the next section we’re going to look at putting a border around a page. So let’s have a look at watermarks. Now you may or may not be familiar with putting a watermark on a page or on a document. Typically they’re used for one of two purposes. They’re either used to denote ownership or copyright on a document and also watermarks are often used to indicate that something is confidential or a level of confidentiality. So putting a watermark on a page in Word 2013 is pretty straightforward. Select the Design tab and then on the Design tab on the right hand end of the Ribbon, we have Page Background and one of the options there is Watermark. Click on the drop down and there are some standard watermarks.

The group at the top are the confidentiality type ones that say things like

Confidential and Do not copy. Some of them are diagonal, some of them are horizontal. And then down at the bottom, you have the disclaimer types of watermark: Draft, Sample, and so on. Let’s just put on Confidential 1. Now you may just be able to make that out on the page here, but let me just go to the View Menu and do the one page view and you should now be able to see Confidential diagonally behind the text and the images on the page. And if I scroll down to the second page, you’ll see that it’s on subsequent pages as well.

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Learn Word 2013 So I’m back on the Design tab now. I’m going to click the Watermark drop down arrow again and I just scroll down a little. Apart from the disclaimer ones we looked at before, we’ve also got some urgent ones here, ASAP, Urgent. And I’m not going to look at the watermarks from Office.com, that’s a good one for you to try, but if I click on Custom Watermark it brings up a Printed Watermark dialog and I can choose No Watermark or I could even use a picture as a watermark. You can put a picture behind everything. And then you also have language, the text for the watermark, the font, the size, the color, whether it needs to be semi-transparent or not, and whether you want it diagonal or horizontal. So you can pretty much adjust that watermark to your specific requirements. That dialog gives you fine control over the watermark.

Cancel from there, back on the

Watermark button again, right at the bottom Remove watermark if you need to remove the watermark. That’s it. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Video: Page Borders Toby: Hello again and welcome back to our course on Word 2013 where we’re looking at a couple of the desktop publishing features of Word. In the last section, we looked at watermarks. In this section, we’re going to look at Page Borders and in fact we’ll have a quick look at Page Color as well. Now these are controlled on the Design tab and the page borders command is available in the Page Background Group at the right hand end of the Design tab. So if I click on Page Borders, it brings up the Borders and Shading dialog that we’ve actually seen before. But the tab that’s selected here is Page Border. Now as with borders generally and we’ve looked at this a couple of times earlier in the course, we can build up any kind of border we want using a combination of the sort of standard settings on the left here. We can change the style of the line using this list here. We can change the color of the line. We can change the width of the line. And as I’ll show you in just a moment, we can also add a sort of art effect. On the right hand end, we have a preview box to preview what selection we’ve made using these controls. And very importantly right near the bottom here, Apply to. We can either say apply this to the whole document or we can say this section or this section first page only or this section all except the first page, etc. Let’s stick with whole document for now. So let’s start with a nice simple case. Let’s say that we just want to put a box around the page. So in the list on the left select Box, click on OK, and I literally get a box around the page. And because I’ve specified whole document, I get in fact a box around each page in the document. And it really is as simple as that. Now let’s see how to change that border. Click on Page Border again to bring the dialog up again. What I could do is to use the style control here, maybe choose a different style. What about this sort of double line border? Click on OK to preview that and now I’ve got a double line border around the whole page. Click again. I can also use the preview box over here and the individual line controls there to change that again. So for instance, let’s suppose that I wanted to remove the vertical lines on the borders and just have a bar at the top and a bar at the

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Learn Word 2013 bottom. Well all I have to do is click on the left hand one to make it disappear, click on the right hand one to make it disappear, click on OK, and now my border is effectively a line at the top and a line at the bottom. Now I think with that you can see the power of being able to put page borders on in terms of making your pages look much more attractive. Let’s just click on Page Borders again. We can also experiment with color. You need to be a little bit careful with the color one because you need to choose a color normally before you put the border on to get the border of that color, and you can have different colors on different sides of the border. So there’s a lot to experiment with there. You can also adjust the width of the borders and art. Now art’s an interesting one because there are a number of options you can use to make a sort of arty border. Not all of these are particularly attractive or subtle, but if you’re doing something maybe an award or an invitation, something a little bit more glitzy, some of these types of arty border can look okay. So for instance, if I went for something like that and clicked on OK, it’s actually quite heavy in terms of a business document, but on a sort of social document it might look absolutely fine. So finally then let me just take a quick look at Page Color. If I click on the Page Color button here, I can choose a page color. Now our paper generally speaking so far on this course has always been white. You may or may not want to choose dark colors for paper. If you do, you probably want to choose light colors for your fonts. But let’s take one of the fairly pale colors, one of the theme colors, maybe that one, and again you can usually get a pretty good effect particularly if you want to produce something which is more social than business. And, of course, these off-white colors can work even in business documents provided you don’t overdo them I think. Okay so that’s a quick end to a look at some of the DTP features of Word 2013. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Chapter 29 – Hyperlinks Video: Types of Hyperlinks Toby: Welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, I’m going to take a quick introductory look at Hyperlinks. Now we’ve already seen a couple of hyperlinks, although I didn’t really refer to them with that term at the time. And what we’re going to do here is we’re going to put a bit of structure into our top five movies document by using hyperlinks. Now this table is the one that I produced earlier for my top five movies. You should have something similar available. And the first thing I’ve done is to type a document heading here, My Top 10. I’m going to go to the Home tab and I’m going to make that into a Heading level 1. I’ll put in another line in after it, and then I’m going to put in a section that’s going to be the section for Skyfall. So I type in Skyfall, make that into a Heading 1 as well, blank lines after that. Now let me put the next movie in, Heading 1. So in that way, I can build up the beginnings of a document with not only the table showing my top five movies but I’m also going to put a little bit of information about each of those five movies in as well. Now incidentally, I got rid of that underlining under Skyfall by just adding it to my dictionary so that the auto-correct check didn’t show it up as a potential spelling error. Now let me go into the table and for the movie Skyfall, I’m going to select Skyfall, just swipe over it with the mouse, and then on the Insert tab I’m going to go into Links and what I’m going to do is to choose Cross-reference. Now I’m going to put in a cross-reference link from the word I’ve selected which is the word Skyfall in the table to the heading Skyfall. Now the reference types available to me are links to headings, bookmarks, footnotes, endnotes, equations, figures, and tables. So at any time I can put a link from my document to one of those things. Now we’ve certainly looked at tables. Figures will typically be our graphics. We haven’t put any equations, endnotes, footnotes in. One or two bookmarks are in implicitly because of other things, but we haven’t looked at bookmarks in detail. But we certainly have looked at headings. And if I click on heading, the headings in my document are listed. Now in this case, I want the heading

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Learn Word 2013 Skyfall. Now if I click Insert and then Close, what I’ve done is to insert a link from the word Skyfall in this table to the Skyfall heading in my document. Now the way this shows up is if I just hover over Skyfall in the table, I don’t see anything particular happen, but note the screen tip there: Control and click to follow the link. So let me just hold the Control key down and now I get the pointing finger. And if I click on Skyfall with the Control key held down, the cursor goes to Skyfall, the beginning of that section. So obviously, similarly if I selected Zero Dark Thirty, went to Insert, Link, Cross-reference, Heading, put in Zero Dark Thirty, insert that link, and close. Now if I hover over Zero Dark Thirty with the Control key held down, it’ll take me to that section in the document. So that’s how I setup basic hyperlinks within my document. Now I’m in Internet Explorer and I’m looking at a review of Skyfall. It’s a review on Empire. I don’t know where you read your movie reviews, maybe IMDB or Empire. Let’s look at the Empire one here and the Empire review is pretty comprehensive and it includes a cast list. It’s got a lot of information about the movie as well as quite a few ads, of course. In the URL, if I click it within Internet Explorer or whichever other browser you use and then press Control-C to copy that I copy the URL to the Clipboard and what I’m now going to do is to paste that URL into my document. So I’ve copied it with Control-C. Let’s go back to the document. So now let me under Skyfall within the section there, I’m going to say “For a review see” and now I’m going to insert again a link, but this time instead of cross-reference, I’m going to choose Hyperlink. And it gives me the option here of inserting a hyperlink in the address. Now I can paste the address, I just copied from Empire and all I’d need to do to that with the keyboard is Control-V, the link is there, and click on OK and I’ve now got a link in my document, let me put a blank line at the beginning there, I’ve now got a link in my document to that review. If I hover over it, again nothing particular happens other than the screen tip. Hold the Control key down though and I’ve got my pointing finger. If I click on that I’ll actually go to the review, the movie review on Empire. So there we are. I’ve got a link from Skyfall to the section about Skyfall. I could put my own review in here. I could maybe copy and paste in the cast list, do anything I like really. But

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Learn Word 2013 importantly, I’ve also got a link to a URL, a web address, and somebody reading my document would actually have this link through to the Empire review. Now, of course, I could do the same thing with Zero Dark Thirty or, of course, I could perhaps try to do a link for Zero Dark Thirty through to a trailer. Now one of the other new features in Word 2013 is the ability to insert links to online video. And also on the Insert tab is this one, Online Video. If I click on Online Video, it brings up a dialog. It usually takes a little bit of time to get started but it gives me two options. One of them is to do a video search and another one is to use a video embed code. Now you may or may not be familiar with video embed codes. It’s the sort of thing you can get for YouTube videos and so on, where you can embed a link into a link in a Word document. But let’s try the Bing video search option. Let’s see if we can find anything about Zero Dark Thirty. And we certainly have several things about Zero Dark Thirty. The first one we’ve got here. If you look at the little commentary which appears in the bottom left of the dialog here, the first one is the movie review, then we’ve got the Academy conversations, cast interviews, there’s a trailer. Let’s try the trailer. Let’s insert that. And that puts a link into our document. Now not only has it put a link in but it puts in a play control and then you can actually click to play that trailer. Now this link is going to be available to you. So I give you the opportunity to play this trailer yourself. But I’m now going to give you the last big exercise to do in this course. And that is you may have noticed that I said at the top there My Top 10, so there’s a bit of a hint. Five is enough actually. If you’ve only got five movies, maybe the same five as me, maybe you’re using this list, five is enough. But go for ten if you can. But what I’d like you to do is to produce your own version of example-18 with links from the entries in the table to sections of the document, one per movie. And within a section of a document, put a link to a review or a link to a cast list or something else and in at least case put a link to an online video, maybe a review or an interview, something about that movie. My answer to that will be example-18. By all means feel free to make yours a little bit more elaborate and extensive than mine and try to vary the types of hyperlink that you use. That’s it on this section. I’ll see you in the next one.

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Learn Word 2013

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Learn Word 2013

Chapter 30 – Security Video: Inspecting and Protecting Documents Toby: Hello and welcome back to our course on Word 2013. In this section, I’d like to look at a couple of aspects of security of your documents in Word 2013 and I’d like to start by looking at what’s called Hidden Data. So this is one of the documents we worked on earlier on. If I go into Backstage View, we’ve already looked at the sort of information we keep about the document. This is information about the document rather than information in the document, and this information is the metadata about the document. We looked at the sort of document properties, earlier on looked at this in some detail. Now just before you distribute a document or certainly before you consider it to be final, it’s always a good idea to run a document inspection. And on this info page we have this option here Inspect Document, check for issues, click on that. We say inspect the document, check the document for hidden properties or personal information and then we can also check for accessibility issues and we can also check for compatibility issues in relation to earlier versions of Word. So as a routine I always do an inspect document. These are the items that I can check when I do a document inspection. So some of them like custom XML data, I’m not even going to begin to explain now, but things like inspecting the document for information in headers, footers, and watermarks. I’m going to leave all of these checked for now and click on Inspect and if Word finds any potential problems, it will tell me about them. And it gives a warning sign. Document properties and personal information. The following document information was found. The author and picture crop information. So within this document we’ve done some picture cropping. Now you may remember in this that we did actually do some picture cropping because we had three or four documents, we had a screenshot in there as well as the ClipArt graphic at the beginning. If I wanted to remove all of that information, including those document properties I’d click on Remove All here.

As far as headers, footers, and watermarks are

concerned, the following items were found: headers and footers. Headers and footers may include shapes such as watermarks.

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Learn Word 2013 Now as with any of the other issues that are flagged here, the important thing is you look at it and you say yeah, I know about those footers. They’re fine. I know about the headers. There’s nothing in there that I need to hide. The watermark says Confidential or Draft or something. I don’t need to do anything. On the other hand, if you’ve been working on the document for a long time and you’ve had Draft in the watermark for weeks or months and now you’re looking at it as a final version, you may well take this as a reminder; ah, I must remove that watermark. I’ve got a watermark in there that says Draft. I need to take that out. So you can scroll through the whole list of these, look at each of the issues that it raises and decide what to do about it if anything. So I’m going to close that and just look at Protect Document because the other way that we may want to secure our work is to protect a document with a password. And in Word 2013, we have this option, Encrypt with password, password protect this document. So if I click on Encrypt with password, I’m asked to enter a password. You should try to use a relatively secure password, one that includes numbers and that’s quite long. I’m going to put a short one on here as I’m only demonstrating this. The one I’m putting on this document is just TobyA. Having typed the password and bear in mind that passwords are case sensitive, click on and I’m asked to enter it again just to make sure that I’ve entered what I really think I’ve entered. Click on OK again. When you’ve protected a document with a password don’t forget when you close it to save the changes. So click on Close, click on Save, and then the next time I open that document I’ll be required to enter that password. The important thing about encrypt with password is that in the past it has been possible who don’t have a password to read the documents in another piece of software and to access the information they contain in that way. If you encrypt with a password, then the contents of the document are actually encrypted and it’s not possible to people to read the content using a different piece of software. If you want to remove a password, you just go into the same mechanism again for protecting with password but leave the password blank. And that’s it on this section on security in Word 2013. I’ll see you in the next section.

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Chapter 31 – Conclusion Video: Microsoft Update; Closing Toby: Hello and welcome to the final section of our course on Word 2013. I’ve just got one last thing to talk to you about in this very short, last section and that is the importance of keeping your computer and your installation of Word 2013 and indeed Office 2013 up to date. Information about doing that is on Microsoft.com. At the time of recording this, there’s a page here “Update your computer” which you can get to via the Word Support route. And there are links there to various useful things like Microsoft Update which should be a regular part of your computer and Office installation update procedure. And bear in mind that some of the features of Word 2013 are dependent on the versions of other products. Just to give you one example, the online video feature that’s introduced in Word 2013 requires at least Internet Explorer 9 to work. So with that make sure you keep things up to date. My name is Toby. I’ve very much enjoyed presenting this course to you. I hope you’ve enjoyed following the course as much and I hope to see you again online soon, so goodbye for now.

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