MIAESR stat report - Melbourne Institute - University of Melbourne

can see the paths that individuals' lives took to those outcomes and the paths they take subse- quently. Indeed, one of the valuable attributes of the HILDA panel is the wealth of information on a variety of life domains that it brings together in one dataset. This allows us to understand the many link- ages between these life ...
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Families, Incomes and Jobs, Volume 9

A Statistical Report on Waves 1 to 11 of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey

The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is funded by the Australian Government Department of Social Services

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Families, Incomes and Jobs, Volume 9:

A Statistical Report on Waves 1 to 11 of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey

Edited by Roger Wilkins Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research The University of Melbourne

The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is funded by the Australian Government Department of Social Services

Edited by Roger Wilkins Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research Faculty of Business and Economics Level 5, 111 Barry Street FBE Building The University of Melbourne Victoria 3010 Australia Tel: +61 3 8344 2100 Fax: +61 3 8344 2111 Web: www.melbourneinstitute.com/hilda © Commonwealth of Australia 2014 ISSN 1834-9781 (Print) ISSN 1834-9773 (Online) All material presented in this publication is provided under a Creative Commons CC-BY Attribution 3.0 Australia licence. For the avoidance of doubt, this means this licence only applies to material as set out in this document.

The opinions, comments and analysis expressed in this document are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Minister for Social Services or the Australian Government Department of Social Services and cannot be taken in any way as expressions of government policy. Photos: multiculturalism (©istockphoto.com/shells1), disabled boy with mother (©istockphoto.com/ozgurdonmaz), health as target (©istockphoto.com/esolla), warehouse manager (©istockphoto.com/Geber86), three-generation family on beach (©istockphoto.com/monkeybusinessimages), Centrelink and Medicare (©istockphoto.com/kokkai), economic (©istockphoto.com/enot-potoskun), Roger Wilkins (©Victoria Lane). Designed and typeset by Uniprint Pty Ltd.

Contents

Contents Introduction

iv

Part 1: Households and Family Life

1

Part 5: Other Topics

87

13. Immigrants to Australia since 2001 Roger Wilkins

88

1. Household dynamics, 2001 to 2011 Markus Hahn and Roger Wilkins

2

14. Emigrants from Australia since 2001 Richard Burkhauser, Markus Hahn and Nicole Watson

94

2. Family circumstances and care arrangements of children Markus Hahn and Roger Wilkins

7

15. Time spent in paid and unpaid work Roger Wilkins

99

3. Major life events Roger Wilkins

Part 2: Incomes and Economic Wellbeing

16

21 23

5. Welfare reliance Roger Wilkins

32

6. Attitudes to financial risk Roger Wilkins

40

18. Study, paid work and moving house: Intentions and outcomes compared Roger Wilkins

Glossary

122

129

47

7. Labour market dynamics Roger Wilkins

48

8. Female breadwinner families Mark Wooden and Markus Hahn

57

9. ‘Non-standard’ employment and job satisfaction Hielke Buddelmeyer

61

Part 4: Life Satisfaction, Health and Wellbeing

108

17. Retirement expectations and outcomes 114 Roger Wilkins

4. The distribution and dynamics of household income Roger Wilkins

Part 3: Labour Market Outcomes

16. Non-co-resident partners Markus Hahn and Roger Wilkins

65

10. Health, disability and life satisfaction Roger W