mindset - The Learning Accelerator

professional development and training partners. Our framework identifies ... Observable. “know-how” and basic mechanics and expertise helpful for execution.
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The Learning Accelerator Blended Learning Educator Competencies As part of our work to support district implementation of blended learning programs, The Learning Accelerator (TLA) has developed a framework to help leaders and teachers better understand the competencies educators need to be e ective in blended teaching and learning environments. This “version 1.0” framework was created through reviewing and compiling research as well as talking with many existing and developing human capital partners across the ecosystem, including school districts, charter management organizations, foundations, and professional development and training partners. Our framework identifies four essential categories of educator competency: Mindset, Qualities, Adaptive Skills, and Technical Skills. Within each of these categories we found that the competencies essential to making blended learning work in schools very much overlap (~80-90%) with those that make educators successful in traditional environments (e.g. student management, data practice, content knowledge, etc.).

However, certain competencies take on more importance because they: •

Enable a transition to mastery-based progression, personalization, and e ective use of technology



Create and cultivate a culture of ongoing learning and innovation over time

TLA Blended Learning Educator Competency Framework

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What

MINDSET

Core values or beliefs that guide thinking, behaviors and actions that align with goals of educational change and mission

How

Similar regardless of system role (teacher, leader, non-instructional)

Understood, adopted and committed to

What

QUALITIES

Personal characteristics and patterns of behavior that help an educator make the transition to new ways of teaching and learning

How Coached, encouraged and reinforced

Mechanisms for building necessarily blended; some possible online components but also degree of ongoing, highertouch support and customization

What

ADAPTIVE SKILLS

Higher complexity that are generalized across domain/jobs. Help people tackle problems and tasks where the solution might be unknown or that require organizational learning and innovation

How Developed through modeling, coaching and reflective practice

What

TECHNICAL SKILLS

Skills that are known and specific to task and domain. Observable “know-how” and basic mechanics and expertise helpful for execution and implementation of day-to-day job (for teachers, instruction)

How Acquired and mastered through instfuction, training and practice

Role dependent, though some roles may share skillsets. Mechanisms likely more scalable, online and modular.

Additional findings about these blended learning competencies: 1. Mechanisms for developing capacity (i.e. training and PD) in each of the competency areas will differ. Some will require more hands-on coaching and support, while others, like building technical skill with specific technologies, can likely be tackled through more modular, scalable online solutions. 2. Competencies become less visible the more student-centric the blended learning approach gets: “off stage” competencies and related activities (modeling, behind-the-scenes planning and engagement) become as, if not more, important as “on-stage” ones (demonstrating, directing). This has real implications for the ways in which educator-effectiveness tools (for example, classroom observation frameworks) should be used and designed. 3. Competencies look different in action as schools shift from traditional to emerging and then more established and innovative blended approaches. For example, teacher collaboration, adaptive skill, takes on different forms in self-contained classroom rotation versus open environment flex models. Given this variance between models, we have articulated a developmental matrix that tries to capture the continuum of competencies, which is shown on the next page.

CONTINUUM OF COMPETENCY DEVELOPMENT DEPENDING ON MODEL, HELPFUL FOR MONITORING/ASSESSMENT OVER TIME Traditional School

Early-Stage, Emerging Blended Learning

Later-Stage, Developed Blended Learning

Baseline for change

"Hybrid"* learning models

Disruptive models

INCREASING PERSONALIZATION, MODEL INNOVATION

MINDSET

Vision for Equity

Inputs-oriented (equity = equal)

Inputs-oriented (equity ≠ equal)

Outcomes-oriented

GrowthOrientation

Performance mindset for self/students; seeks to demonstrate abilities, minimize failures

Growth mindset for self/students; Seeks to grow abilities, sees failure as opportunity to try again

Growth mindset for self/students; Seeks out opportunities to fail in order to learn

Urgency

Achieve classroom learning targets over set period; annual reflection/course correction

Achieve individual learning targets over set period; measures/reflects/plans often

Maximize individual growth as quickly as possible; seeks to rapidly iterate

Role Awareness

"Sage on Stage"; Instructing & directing as expert in content

"Saging and Guiding"; Guiding & directing as content and pedagogy expert

"Guide on Side"; Coaching and facilitating as expert in pedagogy and student learning

Grit

"Get-it-done" attitude, diligent

Perseverant, focus on continuous improvement

Forward failing, challenge-seeking

Flexibility

Adapts from plan, develops contingencies as needed

Rolls w/ punches, wears several hats

Constantly modifies/plays many roles to meet objectives

Transparency

Periodic data and practice sharing for planning purposes

Rigorous, open data sharing w/ staff/students; "open door" culture

Broad ownership of data (students, staff, parents); shared open practice

Collaboration

Minimal between staff, for planning

Moderate between staff, for planning/ complementary delivery

Teaming w/ others (staff, students) to plan & deliver flexibly

Goal Setting

Periodic, focus whole class

Frequent, focus on grouping & interventions

Continuous, focus on individual learning

Problem-Solving

Responsive, implementation-oriented

Frequent, continuous improvement-oriented

Proactive & continuous, design & testing

Data Practices

Periodic, small number inputs, focus on measuring what's learned

Frequent, small number inputs, focus on identifying gaps to differentiate or remediate

Frequent, mult. measures, focus on monitoring/ informing individual learning plan

Instructional Strategies

Whole group, direct w/ some differentiation

Small group, mainly direct w/ differentiation and remediation

Individualized, w/ some economization through small and large group activities

Management

Classroom, focused mainly on behavior & environment

Group, focused on behavior & work supervision

Student, focused on engagement & learning across multiple modalities/ environments

Instructional Tools

Utilizes central curriculum, some supplements

Uses multiple functionally targeted curricula and resources (core & intervention), online & offline

Curates portfolio of resources, experiences, & modalities, online & offline

Technology Integration

Peripheral tools used in isolation, generally administrative purpose

Supplemental tools used as add-ons, generally administrative & intervention

Dynamic use of integrated tools, across instruction and administration

QUALITIES

ADAPTIVE SKILLS

TECHNICAL SKILLS

*According to the Christensen Institute, hybrid learning refers to emergent blended models that combine newer technology innovations with more traditional classroom structures. These include station, lab and flipped classroom rotational models.