oReadWeek - Freedom to Read

Feb 24, 2013 - Pulp novels with gay and lesbian themes were also stopped in the 1950s. ..... the beauty and uplifting nature of literature, its power to humanize ...
6MB Sizes 10 Downloads 150 Views
FREEDOMTOREAD 2013 CU RREN T C EN S O RS HI P I S S UES I N C ANADA

BOOK AND PE RI O DI CAL CO U NC IL

volume 29

Ron Deibert Global Security Sleuth

Targeting LGBT Lit Canada’s History of Discrimination

Classroom Conversation Engaging Boys with Challenged Books

Dissident Artist’s Comeback

Ottawa’s Content Control Mark Bourrie on the Hill

Franke James’s Sidewalk Show

Prose in the Pen An Inmate’s Journey

PLUS

Get Involved

Ideas for Educators

e EVERYONE

freedom of has the

right to

OPINION AND

expression;

this right includes

FREEDOM to hold

without interference

SEEK, RECEIVE and IMPART

ideas any

INFORMATION through

and

AND

and to

media

regardless of frontiers.

e Article 19

U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights

FREEDOMTOREAD2013



There are worse crimes than burning books,” said the Russian poet Joseph Brodsky. “One of them is not reading them.” Freedom to Read 2013 includes stories about both crimes: Lawrence Hill reflects on the threat to burn his Book of Negroes and I.M. GreNãda writes about the challenge of getting books into prisons.

Freedom to Read 2013 explores the shifting forces that threaten our free expression and celebrates those who defend our rights. Ron Deibert discusses his tireless work championing freedom of expression online. Anne Jayne writes about the showdown between the University of Calgary and twin brothers who wrote disparaging remarks about their professor on Facebook. And Mark Bourrie reveals how journalists have diminishing access to Parliament Hill. Brenda Cossman charts the tradition of censoring lesbian and gay literature in Canada. Charles Montpetit shares the story of Canadian artist and writer Franke James who took her message to the streets (and billboards) of Ottawa after the federal government denied her arts funding for criticizing Canada’s environmental record. Freedom to Read 2013 also travels the world. Exiled Iranian author Ava Homa shares her story about the perils of being a journalist in Iran. And our “Global View” highlights some of the world’s worst Internet censors. There is much more, including a roundup of current issues in the news, Hilary McLaughlin’s incisive look at Nick Cohen’s You Can’t Read This Book, and our “Get Involved” section which encourages you to celebrate and defend your freedom to read. Josh Bloch, Editor

Please send your comments and ideas for future issues of Freedom to Read to the Book and Periodical Council, Suite 107, 192 Spadina Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2C2. Phone: (416) 975-9366 Fax: (416) 975-1839 E-mail: [email protected] Visit www.freedomtoread.ca for more information.

Book and Periodical Council

THE BOOK AND PERIODICAL COUNCIL (BPC) WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE FOLLOWING FOR THEIR GENEROUS SPONSORSHIP OF FREEDOM TO READ WEEK 2013:

Canadian Library Association

THE BPC WOULD ALSO LIKE TO THANK THE FOLLOWING ORGANIZATIONS AND INDIVIDUALS FOR THEIR SUPPORT AND IN-KIND DONATIONS:

Manitoba Library Association

Nunavut Public Library Services

reva pomer design

THE BPC THANKS THE FOLLOWING FOR THEIR SPONSORSHIP: LINDA CAMERON, CANADIAN CHILDREN’S BOOK NEWS, CANADIAN LITERATURE, FELICITER, THE FIDDLEHEAD, GROUNDWOOD BOOKS, HOUSE OF ANANSI PRESS, THE INTERNATIONAL FREE EXPRESSION REVIEW, QUILL AND QUIRE, STUDIES IN CANADIAN LITERATURE AND THE WRITERS’ UNION OF CANADA.

THE FOLLOWING PEOPLE CONTRIBUTED AN INCREDIBLE AMOUNT OF TIME AND ENERGY PRODUCING THE KIT AND POSTER AND MAINTAINING THE WEBSITE: JOSH BLOCH, FRANKLIN CARTER, ANNE MCCLELLAND, PEGGY MCKEE, SCOTT MITCHELL, MARG ANNE MORRISON, REVA PO