Proficient Language Arts Lessons - Sanford Inspire

(Back to Table of Contents). Teachers: Subject: Common Core State Standards: • Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action. (2.RL.5). Objective (Explicit):. • TSW accurately summarize important events that occur at the beginning, ...
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Proficient Language Arts Lessons

I.

2nd Grade (I)

II.

2nd Grade (II)

III.

3rd Grade

IV.

12th Grade

Copyright © 2017 Arizona Board of Regents, All rights reserved • SanfordInspire.org

2nd Grade ELA Lesson (I) (Back to Table of Contents)

Teachers:

Subject:

Common Core State Standards: • Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action. (2.RL.5) Objective (Explicit): • TSW accurately summarize important events that occur at the beginning, middle, and end of a story using a flow map. Evidence of Mastery (Measurable):   

Include a copy of the lesson assessment. Provide exemplar student responses with the level of detail you expect to see. Assign value to each portion of the response.

The students’ completed work will be scored at a meets level using an academic expectation rubric. Sub-objectives, SWBAT (Sequenced from basic to complex):   

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How will you review past learning and make connections to previous lessons? What skills and content are needed to ultimately master this lesson objective? How is this objective relevant to students, their lives, and/or the real world?

SWBAT describe the progression of the story. SWBAT identify what thinking map we can use for summarizing. SWBAT define a flow map as a way to show the sequence of events from beginning, middle, and end. SWBAT create a flow map to help them with the parts of a story. SWBAT to explain the purpose of the introduction and ending of a story. SWBAT use summarize a text independently, by identifying key details at the beginning, middle and end of a story.

Materials: PowerPoint, worksheet, paper, visuals for expectations, and visual Opening (state objectives, connect to previous learning, and make relevant to real life)    

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How will you activate student interest? How will you connect to past learning? How will you present the objective in an engaging and student-friendly way? How will you communicate its importance and make the content relevant to your students?

State what the lesson is going to be on today. Show PowerPoint: o State objective, standard, and expectations o State purpose of the lesson: The purpose of today’s lesson is for you to become better readers by paying attention to the different parts of the story to increase your comprehension of story. • For example: You have been working on creating graphs, and in order to create graphs you had to identify the important steps from the beginning to the middle to the end. o Show a picture of a flow map o State what a flow map is for. o Think... Share... Tell: What are we going to use the flow map for today? • B’s start the conversation - Pull Popsicle stick for a student to share.

Copyright © 2017 Arizona Board of Regents, All rights reserved • SanfordInspire.org

Teacher Will:      

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Student Will:

TW read The Ice Cream Problem to the students aloud. TW begin think aloud after reading. Refer back to objective. TW begin think aloud: “I am going to be using my flow map to help me summarize this story. I want to explain what happens at the beginning, middle, and end of a story.

Instructional Input

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How will you model/explain/demonstrate all knowledge/skills required of the objective? What types of visuals will you use? How will you address misunderstandings or common student errors? How will you check for understanding? How will you explain and model behavioral expectations? Is there enough detail in this section so that another person could teach it?

“I remember that I have to write first then make my box so I will not run out of room while writing.” “I know I