Research Accelerator - Department of Pediatrics

Research Accelerator: Stimulating Scientists to Step Up the Pace ... Advancing Translational Science, the ITM has funded, trained, and provided research ...
126KB Sizes 4 Downloads 90 Views
Chicago Pediatrics Monthly 

 

January 2015 

Research Accelerator: Stimulating Scientists to Step Up the Pace  The Institute for Translation Medicine may be one of University of Chicago’s best kept secrets. “We give  away pilot funding and research services—lots of it—yet many faculty and trainees have no idea we’re  here,” says Lainie Ross, co‐director of the ITM. Funded with more than $50 million by the Clinical and  Translational Science Award (CTSA) from the National Institutes of Health/National Center for  Advancing Translational Science, the ITM has funded, trained, and provided research services to more  than 1,800 UChicago investigators since 2007. The ITM is part of a consortium of 62 research  institutions that receive funding from CTSA; additional financial support is provided by UChicago.  The primary goal of the ITM is to accelerate translational research, which it does in multiple ways. The  ITM provides funding for pilot projects that might never have otherwise attracted interest from major  granting organizations; offers services to prevent research from getting bogged down for want of, say,  an electron microscope or genome sequencing; connects researchers with collaborators in the  community and at other research institutions; and consults on how to get larger grants approved by the  NIH and other funding agencies. “We can help make your study robust and scientifically sound and  assist you in carrying out your research quickly and ethically,” says Ross.  ITM pilot funds cover all stages of the translational medicine spectrum and are available to  investigators at every stage of their careers. The larger (~$40,000) awards are intended as seed funding  for promising translational and clinical research projects, allowing researchers to generate preliminary  data required to obtain subsequent funding from NIH and other organizations. In 2012, for example,  Daniel Johnson received a pilot award to develop Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes  (ECHO‐Chicago), clinical training sessions using videoconferencing to connect UCM subspecialists with  primary care providers in federally qualified health centers in Chicago. Since then, Johnson has received  more than $876,000 in support from eight organizations and has been funded for $1.55 million in the  first year of a four‐year grant from the CDC to develop a surveillance system for identifying and tracking  the outcomes of patients in Chicago with hepatitis C.   Dana Suskind used both a pilot award and a K‐fellowship to study the language development disparity  she saw among her patients from poor families. Two years later, she received a three‐year Institute of  Education Sciences award to test her educational intervention program for parents, and she’s since  been awarded a U.S. Department of Education grant to further develop her program’s curriculum.  More recently, Dorit Koren received a pilot award to study how sleep habits in adolescents contribute  to type 2 diabetes risk.   Since 2008, the ITM has awarded nearly $ 5.7 million in pilot awards, including eight to investigators  from the department of Pediatrics. Thirty‐four of the 114 investigators who received pilot awards from  2008 to 2014 were able to secure additional grants from external organizations, totaling over $53  million in direct cost funding.      1   

Chicago Pediatrics Monthly 

 

January 2015 

The ITM has several categories of pilot awards, including one that grants up to $25,000 per  collaborating institution to researchers who partner with scientists at ITM affiliates—NorthShore  University HealthSystem, Illinois Institute of Technology, and Rush University Medical Center—to  increase the potential for new discoveries.   Once researchers are ready to apply for a major extramural grant, the ITM’s R Studio can help them  write a strong, competitive proposal with feedback from senior faculty in the same field. “You can come  in with an amorphous idea and we’ll help you turn it into a tightly