research papers - Kristen E. Dybala, Ph.D.

sets of bird-monitoring data and the contributions of field sta- tions. We use our ..... Monitoring Network has identified continent-wide trends in population indices ...
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RESEARCH PAPERS

The Condor 113(4):713–723 © The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011

FORTY-FIVE YEARS AND COUNTING: REFLECTIONS FROM THE PALOMARIN FIELD STATION ON THE CONTRIBUTION OF LONG-TERM MONITORING AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE FUTURE ELIZABETH L. PORZIG1, 2, 4, K RISTEN E. D YBALA1, 2 , THOMAS GARDALI1, GRANT BALLARD1, GEOFFREY R. GEUPEL1, AND JOHN A. WIENS1, 3 2

1 PRBO Conservation Science, 3820 Cypress Drive #11, Petaluma, CA 94954 Avian Conservation and Ecology Lab, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology, University of California, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 3 School of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia

Abstract. Long-term monitoring is essential to understand the effect of environmental change on bird populations. Ornithological field stations that have recorded detailed demographic data on bird populations over decades are well positioned to make important contributions to emerging research questions. On the basis of our experience at PRBO Conservation Science’s Palomarin Field Station and a review of the literature, we assess the ability of field stations to use their long-term data to address current and future issues in conservation and management. We identify barriers to the application of data from field stations as well as some of the unique contributions made by these stations, and we present recommendations regarding the development, maintenance, and enhanced application of long-term data. Key words: climate change, demography, field station, long-term monitoring, Palomarin.

Cuarenta y Cinco Años y Contando: Reflexiones desde la Estación de Campo Palomarin sobre la Contribución del Monitoreo de Largo Plazo y Recomendaciones para el Futuro Resumen. El monitoreo de largo plazo es esencial para entender los efectos de los cambios ambientales sobre las poblaciones de aves. Las estaciones de campo ornitológicas que han registrado datos demográficos detallados de poblaciones de aves a lo largo de décadas están bien posicionadas para hacer contribuciones importantes para preguntas emergentes. Con base en nuestra experiencia en la Estación de Campo Palomarin de Ciencias de la Conservación y en una revisión de la literatura, determinamos la capacidad de las estaciones de campo de usar sus datos de largo plazo para abordar problemas actuales y futuros sobre conservación y manejo. Identificamos las limitantes para el uso de los datos de las estaciones de campo, así como algunas de las contribuciones únicas hechas por estas estaciones, y presentamos recomendaciones con relación al desarrollo, mantenimiento y la aplicación mejorada de datos de largo plazo.

INTRODUCTION Bird populations worldwide have faced growing threats over the last century, and extensive effort has been devoted to understanding the causes and documenting the consequences of these threats (Robbins et al. 1989, Brown et al. 2001, Sanderson et al. 2006). In light of the rapid environmental changes that are now underway, the need for long-term data and monitoring are greater than ever (U.S. NABCI Monitoring Subcommittee

2007, Wiens 2008). Long-term data can help us understand baseline ecological processes, provide a context for unexpected changes, quantify the processes that drive trends, test and validate projections, and provide guidance to future research. Long-term ornithological data sets vary in scope, scale, and objectives and span time frames from a decade to well over half a century (e.g., Isle of May Bird Observatory, founded in 1934; Fair Isle Bird Observatory, founded in 1948; Long Point Bird Observatory, founded in 1960; Powdermill

Manuscript received 1 November 2010; accepted 18 May 2011. 4 E-mail: [email protected] The Condor, Vol. 113, Number 4, pages 713–723. ISSN 0010-5422, electronic ISSN 1938-5422. © 2011 by The Cooper Ornithological Society. All rights reserved. Please direct all requests for permission to photocopy or reproduce article content through the University of Californ