strategic - Royal New Zealand Navy

To have all systems, personnel and infrastructure ready for .... As we develop the Navy's Strategic Plan, and as we go about our business, we must take.
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RNZN 148

2008 STRATEGIC PLAN

To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Foreword If we want to take everyone in the Navy on the journey to achieve Our Vision - to be the best small-nation Navy in the world – it is particularly important that we do three things. •

First we must describe what ‘the best small-nation Navy’ in the world would look like – we must have an understanding across the Navy of the ‘end point’ we are aiming for.



Second, we must have an ‘adaptive’ plan to enable us to get to that point – a plan that sets out the challenges and opportunities that lie in front of us – and the track we will take to overcome and exploit them and move us in the right direction.



Third, we must keep everyone advised of our progress towards the Vision. This is critical if they are to take ‘ownership’ of the journey.

While this Strategic Plan is essentially ‘the plan’, it also provides to some extent definition to the ‘end point’ and, through the Navy’s strategic management process, it serves as an ‘enabler’ for ‘feedback’ to the wider Navy community. If we are to become ‘the best small-nation Navy in the World’ then we need to recognise we are, to use an athletic analogy, in a marathon and not a sprint. If we are to win, then it is important that in running it we have the confidence and willingness to change our ‘tactics’ as the shape of the race changes. Consequently, to be effective, the Strategic Plan, like the Navy, must be adaptive to changing circumstances – both within and outside the Navy – and within and outside New Zealand. However, there are two elements that will not change - our Vision and our Core Values. Our Vision requires us to be Excellent at operations - enabled by an excellent organisation and excellent people. Our Core Values require our behaviour to be characterised by Commitment, Comradeship and Courage. This latest version of the Navy’s Strategic Plan sets a course towards the Vision for everyone in the Navy – be they Regular Force, Civilian Staff, Volunteer Reserves or Honorary Naval Officers. It provides a framework in which each of us, if we look carefully enough, can identify an opportunity to make our contribution to making our Navy one of the best in the world.

D.I. LEDSON Rear Admiral Chief of Navy

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

CONTENTS Page

Foreword

1

Navy Strategic Management Process

3

Progress

4

Purpose and Expectations

6

Environment, Strategic Capability and Challenges

8

Goals, Strategies and Governing Principles

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Strategic Goal 1 Strategic Goal 2 Strategic Goal 3 Strategic Goal 4 Strategic Goal 5 Governing Principles

17 20 23 28 31 33

Deployment, Implementation, Evaluation and Celebration

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Annex A – Strategic Journey Maps

A1

Annex B – NZDF Strategic Objectives

B1

Annex C – Navy Strategic Management Process Steps

C1

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Navy Strategic Management Process Get It, Set It, Move It, Prove It If we are to have confidence in a plan, and if we are to take ownership of it, it is important that we understand how it was developed – and the context in which it was developed. The RNZN 2008-2025 Strategic Plan was created by following the first three steps in the Navy Strategic Management Process (SMP), which is illustrated in Annex C. The SMP has four principal components, ‘Get It’, ‘Set It’, ‘Move It’ and ‘Prove It’ – complemented by a very important fifth part ‘Celebrate It’. This Strategic Plan covers ‘Get It’ and ‘Set It’. The SMP is an ongoing process. It is also one that builds in an expectation that adjustments will be made, and adaptation of the Plan will occur. This is deliberate. There is a saying in military circles that “a plan is merely a basis for change.” This does not, however, mean that we should not plan. What it does mean is that as circumstances change, so the plan should be reviewed and, if necessary, itself be changed. As we all know, without a navigation plan, a ship has little chance of reaching its destination or fulfilling its mission. We know, too, that the Captain ‘signs off’ on the plan before the ship sails. However, this does not mean the plan cannot be changed. Two general types of changes can subsequently be made. The first type is where the plan itself is not altered, but rather, the course-to-steer and ship’s speed are constantly adjusted, so that the ship can maintain ‘planned track’ and reach waypoints (objectives) on time, taking into account contextual changes such as the nuances of the weather and the sea. This type can be characterised as a ‘5 degrees of wheel’ adjustment. The second adjustment is to the navigation plan itself, where the planned track is changed to avoid storms that might develop, to effect repairs, to fulfil new taskings, to go to new destinations, or to take advantage of new opportunities. This type can be characterised as a ’30 degrees of wheel’ adjustment. The RNZN Strategic Plan is no different to a navigation plan. It will not provide future certainty of direction, speed and tasks but, because we operate in a dynamic environment and we ourselves are learning and growing, it does provide the opportunity to make changes – if that is the right thing to do. This approach will ensure that it remains relevant, practical and directed towards achieving our Vision.

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Progress Against the Previous Plan How well did we Move It and Prove It? To help manage future progress against the planned track, we must look at past progress. This helps us to identify and apply ‘lessons learned’; it is also a way of better understanding our environment, and is analogous to an Officer of the Watch calculating and then applying the effects of tidal stream, current and wind to the future course and speed. At the end of every year of the Strategic Plan, we conduct a fix to see how far we managed to get down our planned track – we also conduct fixes at least three times during the year. The new strategic management process, and the plan that it produced, was launched in July 2006. At the end of June 2007, we took a fix, and plotted the following position against each of our previous strategic goals (reported as percent off track)1, summarised in Table 1 below: FIX RELATIVE TO PLANNED TRACK

STRATEGIC GOAL2

1. To have every position manned with the right person by 2011

More than 10% off track

2. To have all systems, personnel and infrastructure ready for the PROTECTOR vessels to enable them to generate Maritime Military Capability when they are delivered to the Navy

More than 10% off track

3. To regenerate and sustain Maritime Military Capability across the current and future fleet

On track overall

4. To align personnel and engineering practices to the Versatile Navy

Up to 10% off track

5. To be able to manage all activities to maximise results

Up to 10% off track

6. To be effective at managing change

7. To demonstrate the value added by the Navy to New Zealand

On track overall

On track overall

Table 1 – Progress Against Strategic Goals

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Summary based on June 2007 Strategic Plan Scorecard. The fix – and the associated ‘traffic light’ colours shows progress against the planned objectives (or waypoints) for the end of FY 06/07; it does not reflect the variance from the final goals. Essential information whilst on the voyage is variance from the planned track to the destination, not variance from the final destination. 2 Our goals have been refined in this version of the Strategic Plan.

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

As well as a fix against the goals, we also plotted a fix against the total of all objectives (individual project targets and Key Performance Indicators - KPIs). This fix showed that just 41% of our Strategic Plan projects were on track, and we were on track for 57% of our KPIs. A large contributor to the variance was significant delays to milestones and key deliverables of Project PROTECTOR. These delays significantly impacted on the Navy’s own programme of introduction into service of the ships. If Strategic Goal 2 is removed from the planned track, then 49% of our Strategic Plan projects were on track, and we were on track for 68% of our KPIs.

Is there anything to celebrate? Progress against projects was less than half of what was planned. Although we know that project progress has improved compared with previous Strategic Plans, this presents a sizeable Opportunity for Improvement (OFI). The reasons for our limited progress include over-ambitious planning, inaccuracies in forecasting effort, high organisational tempo and a loss of personnel to unanticipated external demands, including HQNZDF programmes. Nevertheless, there is a lot to celebrate. The fact that we are monitoring progress against the plan, and executing a large proportion of it, is an improvement on our past practice. Of organisations that have a strategic planning process, only 56% track execution of strategic initiatives, and most companies are concerned that they are not executing their strategy.3 Furthermore, our strategic management process has itself improved. As judged by external evaluation against the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence (CPE), our process of strategic planning and execution is almost twice as good as it was in 2001, and in 2006 it was evaluated as being ’world class’. It is noteworthy, too, that one year into our new Strategic Plan we were on track or no more than ten percent off track for five of our seven goals, and the majority of our strategic KPIs had been met. However, perhaps the biggest cause for celebration is our late 2006 achievement of the highest Baldrige CPE score of any organisation in New Zealand for 10 years. The rigorous external evaluation process provides a strategic-level navigational position fix for the Navy in terms of leadership, strategic management, customer focus, measurement, analysis and knowledge management, human resource focus, process management and results. It shows that we have all made quite rapid progress from our assessment of 37% in 2001 to 60% in 2006. We are not yet ‘world Class’ but we are closer than we have ever been.

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McKinsey worldwide survey of 796 executives from companies with revenues exceeding US$500m, conducted in July and August 2006.

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Purpose and Expectations Get It – Why are we here? What must we deliver? The first step we must take in the SMP is to ‘Get It’. This means that we must understand our organisational DNA (internal factors), and the expectations that others have of us (external factors). This is where we reflect on our Mission – what we do – and what no one else does.

OUR MISSION “To contribute to the prosperity and security of all New Zealanders through the delivery of versatile, responsive, and effective Maritime Military Capability across the Spectrum of Operations” Understanding the key elements of our Mission enables us to take them into account across everything that we do - from our daily activities right through to those things we do at the strategic level. Figure 1 illustrates the range of Maritime Military Capabilities that the Versatile Navy can perform across the Spectrum of Operations.

KEY MISSION ELEMENTS Prosperity and Security: New Zealand is a maritime country situated in the vast reaches of the South Pacific dependent on secure sea lines of communication (SLOC) for the transportation of around 95% of our trade – exports and imports – and for a secure and stable Asia-Pacific region and broader international community to facilitate that trade. Maritime Military Capability: The Navy achieves military effects in the operational space on the sea, and from the sea into land and air dimensions, through its ships, helicopters, and its Sailors. Versatile: The Navy is capable of performing many tasks in many different contexts – applying both ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ power. Responsive: The Navy is able to react quickly to changing operational demands, and positively to CDF’s requirements. Effective: The Navy is able to deliver the required effects where and when required. Spectrum of Operations: The Navy is able to conduct a wide range of tasks from Multi-Agency operations around New Zealand with the IPVs, through to Combat Operations overseas with the ANZAC frigates.

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

We deliver our outcomes – prosperity and security for all New Zealanders – through our contribution to the NZDF’s overall effort in defending and asserting our nation’s sovereignty – close to home - and promoting and protecting our national interests – further afield. This means that we are responsible to the Chief of Defence Force (CDF) for executing the Mission. This makes the CDF one of our principal ‘customers’. As we develop the Navy’s Strategic Plan, and as we go about our business, we must take into account the CDF’s Guidance and the associated NZDF vision, mission and objectives these are summarised at Annex B.

Figure 1 – Versatile Maritime Military Capability across the Spectrum of Operations

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Environment, Strategic Capability and Challenges Get It - What will impact on us? How capable are we? What will challenge us? To really ‘Get It’, we first need to look out into the external environment that we will be operating in as we execute our Mission; scanning near and far, and then make sense of what we see by comprehensively and systematically examining it. This process gives us ‘situational awareness’. And it is important to note that ‘situational awareness’ is not an end in itself, it is merely an enabler for better decision making. We help make sense of the environment by focusing on four main factors that could influence our ability to make the progress we want. They are: • • • •

Political/Legal Economic Socio-cultural, and Technological

The acronym for these four factors is PEST4 (see the SMP ‘Get It’ step at Annex C). The following is a very brief summary of some of the factors:

Political Factors Politically, we operate in a democratic environment that is now more complex than it has been in the past. The introduction of MMP, the advent of ‘open government’, a growing development of whole of government and ‘NZ Incorporated’ delivery of government services, and the increasing intrusion of legal elements into much of what we do, all require an increased sensitivity to the political and legal space we now occupy.

Economic Factors The domestic economic situation means that young people today have a greater range of options for employment than they had in the past, presenting very real challenges for recruitment and retention. However, we also need to be aware of the up and downside of the global shift to more open economies – on the ease with which people can move from one country to another, on the ripple effect that a crisis in one part of the world can have on many other parts – in both a security and economic sense. An additional significant economic challenge is the likelihood that military technology costs will outstrip New Zealand’s economic growth rate.

Socio-cultural Factors The population demographic in New Zealand shows two distinct characteristics – the European component is aging and the Maori/Polynesian component is getting younger. This has implications for our recruiting and retention strategies. So, too, do factors such as the reducing number of 18-24 year olds who have a propensity to join us, and the relative mobility of young people today. All of these elements mean that recruiting and retention challenges will characterise our ‘people landscape’ for the foreseeable future.

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The Naval Excellence Office facilitates the PEST analysis process and maintains a detailed register of PEST factors and their implications.

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Technological Factors Technology has the capability to make our business more complex or simpler. In view of the proliferation of technological ‘solutions’ and ‘silver bullets’ it will be critical that we develop the ability to be an informed, sceptical and pragmatic consumer of technology.

Get It - How capable are we? Having achieved situational awareness we must then take a ‘good hard look’ at ourselves, including our Strengths and Weaknesses, and our Opportunities and Threats5 (SWOT), within all the elements that make up our Navy. The four parts of SWOT interact – for example, sometimes a strength may also be a weakness or an opportunity, depending on the context. We conduct a SWOT analysis of each of the following areas of the Navy: Personnel, Capability and Support, Naval Support Services, Command and Corporate, and Maritime Component Command/Fleet. Within these areas we ‘SWOT’ structure, processes, culture, competences, resources and policies.6 The following is a very brief summary of some of the factors:

Strengths Our strengths include a general commitment across the Navy to our Vision and our Core Values. Other strengths include a well-defined and consolidated structure overall, good processes in much of the Navy with a clear customer focus, and a culture that is characterised by a desire to continuously improve. A perennial strength is the courage to grapple with unfamiliar situations and operations and to succeed in these (the ‘can do’ approach). The Fleet we will have once Project PROTECTOR is completed will bring both quality and quantity to our force structure.

Weaknesses Our weaknesses include some slow processes coupled with a tendency to see them as ends rather than means. We recognise that our recruitment processes need to be stronger; we have less personnel than we need – and other resources, including finances, are under some pressure. This means that we have limited capacity to implement changes that will speed us towards our Vision whilst simultaneously delivering on our Mission – as well as other NZDF commitments. We have identified that our processes for deciding the right things to do, and our approaches to implementing changes to get the required outcomes, need to be stronger. This has highlighted that we need to have a better understanding of how our business (of being a Navy) works, and we need to be better at measuring all parts of our business – our operations, our organisation, and our people.

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Opportunities and Threats can be both inside the Navy and in our external environment. The Naval Excellence Office facilitates the SWOT analysis and maintains a detailed register of SWOT factors and their implications. For other factors that are reviewed to identify our strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats, see the ‘Get It’ step in the SMP at Annex C.

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Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Opportunities We have many exciting opportunities. The PROTECTOR vessels provide an opportunity to increase our profile and so help communicate our ‘value’ to New Zealand as we deliver even more military capability across the spectrum of operations. The same ships also create exciting career opportunities for our people. We also have opportunities in our core capability, especially in developing capabilities at low cost that will be valued by Other Government Agencies (OGAs), the wider NZDF, and coalition partners. Within the NZDF, we have many opportunities to integrate – where appropriate – with Army and Air Force functions and processes, to improve our efficiency and our effectiveness in line with the NZDF Vision of ‘Three Services as One Force being the best at everything we do’.

Threats We face a variety of threats. Some of these derive from the factors identified in our PEST analysis, such as the threat of even tighter labour constraints – and possibly even fiscal pressures. Operational demands and subsequent tempo - due to global political and economic factors - might stretch us too far, and the threat of other demands on our own resources through rising operational and organisational tempo might further reduce our ability to implement the strategies and initiatives that will take us towards our Vision. Indeed, too high a level of organisational tempo may well push us to organisational exhaustion. We must also be wary of society not understanding our contribution to every New Zealander’s security and prosperity, across the entire spectrum of operations. If our value is not recognised, then it will be much harder to recruit and retain the personnel we need.

Get It - What will challenge us? Having conducted the PEST and SWOT analyses, and other analyses including our risks and our past performance, we need to be able to answer the question, ‘Given our situation, and taking into account our capacity and our capabilities, what are the key things we need to deal with – to get to grips with - if we are to complete the assigned task?’ This will enable us to identify the key strategic challenges, or navigational hazards, that lie between our destination and us. Some of these will be hazards right in front of us – and some of these are great big rocks that we may fall over; these we need to deal with immediately by kicking them to one side or stepping over them. Others will be further ahead and those can be dealt with later. Some will be things we can manoeuvre around, others objects we have to manoeuvre through. Some will affect mission delivery - others our ability to achieve our Vision. We have identified six Key Strategic Challenges lying ahead of us over the next few years – significant things we cannot afford to ignore if we are to achieve success. It is these challenges that we will have to address over the coming years. However, they are not the only challenges that dot the surface ahead of us. If the Strategic Challenges can be characterised as rocks then these other challenges are pebbles – and while a rock can trip you over, a pebble in your shoe can end up achieving a similar effect. Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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We have to deal with both the rocks and the pebbles – this Strategic Plan is about the rocks – other plans will deal with the pebbles. All of the challenges, but the Strategic Challenges in particular, stand between us and our ability to improve the level at which we deliver our Mission - and so the speed of advance that we are able to make towards our Vision.

OUR KEY STRATEGIC CHALLENGES 1.

Manning the Navy

2.

Introducing the PROTECTOR Fleet

3.

Maintaining Combat Viability

4.

Managing Change

5.

Measuring and Managing Performance and Value

6.

Optimising Investment and Resources

These Strategic Challenges are amplified below: •

Manning the Navy. Our Core Purpose - our Mission - requires us to send ships to sea. To do that we first and foremost, need Sailors. The significant driver of the numbers we require is the number and types of ships in the Fleet. If we do not have the right number of the right people in the right place – at sea, in support areas ashore, and in the VR, then we can achieve neither our Core Purpose nor our Vision. Manning the Navy means recruiting and retaining the right number of the right people – military and civilian.



Introducing the PROTECTOR Fleet. The biggest risk to mission delivery and our reputation that we have faced for many years lies right in front of us. It is Project PROTECTOR, which requires us to introduce into operational service seven new ships of three different types with a number of complex capability issues to resolve and over a time period that is turning out to be almost impossible to quantify. This challenge is given an added dimension because we are required to conduct introduction into service tasks within organisational structures sized to support the ‘fleet in being’.



Maintaining Combat Viability. A critical component of our identity as a Navy - and our Mission delivery - is the capability to conduct combat operations and to support them. The ANZAC frigate force is key to this and both frigates require a Platform Systems Upgrade (PSU) and a Self Defence Upgrade (SDU) within the next few years. Other ships also play an important role and we need to ensure they remain ‘fit for purpose’. Combat viability, however, requires more than just ships. There are important personnel, doctrinal and process issues that also need to be addressed as new capabilities are introduced into our ships and into the force structure.

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao



Managing Change. That change lies ahead of us is an inescapable reality – and its rate and extent are unpredictable. However, whether it is destructive or constructive depends to a large extent on the change management framework and culture that we have inside Navy. Change can either help us float or make us sink – we have to make sure it is the former and not the latter. This means we have to ‘do the right things the right way’ and ‘do things well.’ It also means we need to discard structures, processes and practices that add little or no value.



Measuring Performance and Value. If we are to improve the level at which we execute the Mission – and so achieve our Vision - then we need to measure what we do. If we cannot measure things we cannot improve our performance – nor can we demonstrate to others that we are doing better. Measurement will help us to know if we are ‘doing things well’ and getting the outcomes we are aiming for. It will also help us make better decisions and stimulate an ‘inquisitive’ culture inside Navy.



Optimising Investment and Resources. Our resources – people, money, ships and shore infrastructure – are not limitless. We must work towards the most effective use of our resources and ensure that we use them in the most efficient manner. This challenge is about getting the right balance between effectiveness and efficiency.

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Goals, Strategies and Governing Principles Set It Having ‘Got It’, identified our Mission, expectations, environment and strategic capability, and ‘put a ring around’ our Strategic Challenges, we have to ‘Set It’. In other words, we must set and define our destination – our Vision – and set a course towards it. The course may not necessarily be a direct one. In order to avoid ‘obstacles’ ahead of us it may be based on an indirect approach. ‘Direct’ or ‘indirect’, it has to be a course that provides some measurable waypoints or end states that we will aim to reach as we move towards 2025, and some pathways to reach these. It also has to be a course that is ‘safe’ and within agreed ‘boundaries of manoeuvre’ and it is these ‘boundaries’ that the governing principles establish. The strategies, or planned tracks, lead through or around our challenges towards the goals, and have measurable way points (objectives) that will help us to mark progress. Both goals and objectives are expressed as outcomes. In some cases the strategies will be about changing the environment, in others, working with it. In the short to medium term the goals will inevitably fall short of the Vision, but will lie in its direction. Over time, as the goals are reached, other goals will be set that will take us closer to the Vision. The basic ‘Set It’ terms and their relationships are illustrated in Figure 2.

Figure 2 – RNZN Basic ‘Set It’ Terms

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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Set It - What will we aim for in the long term? The ultimate goal – and the final destination - is the Vision itself.

OUR VISION ‘To be the best small-nation Navy in the world’ ‘Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao’ The Vision - and what it means - can be made more identifiable by describing what the Navy will look like when we finally become ‘the best’. One way to do this is to use the elements of the Navy’s Performance Measurement Framework (PMF) - People, Resources, Leadership, Career and Work Systems, Logistics Systems, and Operational Readiness, and link illustrative statements to each of them.

When we are the best small-nation Navy in the world, we will be able to say and demonstrate that: • We ensure that CDF’s expectations are met every time and that Mission success is achieved on time, in full and as directed by delivering versatility across the full spectrum of operations, by ensuring ship availability is optimised, and by exploiting capability to its fullest extent. • Our People are the right people for whom our Core Values are a way of life. They are resilient, motivated, satisfied and able to do what they are required to do because they have the competencies to enable them to do it. • We achieve organisational excellence and outstanding leadership performance across the Navy through leaders who are action focused and guided by our Core Values and who understand that the right people are precious and are to be valued . • Our Navy maximises the opportunities for individuals to deliver excellence in their work through giving them the skills they need to succeed and supporting them in meeting their personal and professional aspirations – and by creating an organisational environment in which they are able to make their contribution. • We seek maximum organisational and operational effectiveness through the efficient exploitation of all resources – in particular financial and infrastructural resources. • We leverage off the best balance between efficiency and effectiveness in our Logistics System to enable operational excellence.

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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Set It - What will we aim for in the medium term? With the desired future state described in outline form, we can then set goals for the coming years, all in the direction of the Vision, and all in their own way addressing the strategic challenges. The goals remain largely the same as in the previous Strategic Plan, but have been reworded to reflect achievements since the last Strategic Plan, and an increased focus on what we are actually trying to achieve, and by when. The number of goals has reduced from seven to five. This is a ‘5 degrees of wheel’ adjustment.

OUR KEY STRATEGIC GOALS SG1 – Every position manned with the right person by December 2014 SG2 – Seven PROTECTOR ships delivering 100% of their capability by December 2009 SG3 – Credible and sustainable Maritime Military Capability across the spectrum of operations in New Zealand and overseas SG4 - Excellent performance measurement, management and continuous improvement approaches by December 2011 SG5 - The majority of New Zealanders understanding the benefits we bring to the Nation through the exploitation of Maritime Military Capability by December 2011 The goals have been prioritised after making pair-wise comparisons7, as shown in Figure 3. These priorities are not absolute, they are relative – and so a goal with a lower priority than others does not mean that the goal is not important. The relative priorities are relevant, however, when trade-offs have to be made during the development of strategies, and when developing lower level unit or functional area plans. The priorities also assist in allocating resources against the goals and their respective strategies. Figure 4 illustrates our six Key Strategic Challenges, and the related five Strategic Goals that, as we progress towards them, will lead us closer to our Vision. Some of these goals, such as the goal to have the PROTECTOR ships delivering all of their capability by December 2009, will be achieved in the short term, while others will stretch at least until the Plan horizon of 2025. The planned tracks (strategies) to our goals can be found at Annex A. Over the next few years, new goals might need to be added; and these will be ’30 degrees of wheel’ adjustments to the Strategic Plan. 7

This process, otherwise known as Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP), involves in turn comparing one goal against each of the others and deciding which of the goals in the pair is more important and by how much. Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Weighting 0

0.05

0.1

0.15

0.2

0.25

0.3

SG 1 - Every position manned with the right person by December 2014 SG 2- Seven PROTECTOR ships delivering 100% of their capability by December 2009 SG 3 - Credible and sustainable MMC across the spectrum of operations in NZ and overseas SG 4 - Excellent performance measurement, management and continuous improvement approaches by December 2011 SG 5 - The majority of New Zealanders understanding the benefits we bring to the nation through the exploitation of MMC

Figure 3 – Strategic Goal Relative Priorities

Figure 4 – Navy Strategic Challenges and Goals

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Strategic Goal 1 Every position manned with the right person by December 2014 Manning the Navy is our Number One challenge. Without Sailors – RF and VR - to go to sea our ships can do nothing more than lie alongside a wharf in the Naval Base. Without Sailors and civilians to work ashore our people cannot be trained and our ships cannot be maintained – nor can our significant infrastructure and facilities provide the wide range of services they are required to deliver. Without people to deploy overseas as members of Joint NZDF teams on operations in places such as Afghanistan, Timor Leste, Lebanon and Sudan we will not lifting our share of the ‘joint weight’. To have the right people in the right numbers means we have to recruit and retain the right people in the right numbers. Strategic Plans are about reaching for aspirational goals and so our personnel ‘stretch’ goal is to man the Navy completely by 2014. However, the critical qualifier is the right people. In recent years it has been a mantra that people are the most important ‘asset’ or ‘resource’ of any organisation. This is a myth. There are a number of people in any organisation who are not right for a number of reasons – they cannot get the right competencies or their behaviours are right out of line with the Core Values; these are just two examples. If ‘the right bunk cannot be found on the right ship’ these people and the Navy have to part company, because there is an unacceptable risk to, among a number of things, the integrity of the organisational DNA. It is not just people who will make us the best small-nation Navy in the world. It is the ‘right people’ who will enable us to achieve that Vision – and ensure that we do not compromise our contribution to the NZDF’s Vision. We have learned, too, that the right people are not just ‘right’ – they are also precious. But if we have the right people, we are only half way there. We also have an obligation to provide the right training. Within the near future we will be a Versatile Navy. We will have 13 ships of seven different classes giving us for the first time a spectrum of capabilities from the combat capability in the ANZACs and the SH 2G helicopters, to the replenishment capability in ENDEAVOUR and an amphibious capability in CANTERBURY, to the MCM capability in MANAWANUI and the Operational Diving Team, the military hydrography and operational geospatial capability in RESOLUTION and the deployable detachment, and the maritime patrol and response capabilities of the PROTECTOR Class OPVs and LAKE Class IPVs. No other Navy of our size has such a broad spectrum of capabilities. But this mix of capabilities also brings challenges to the Navy.

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In a Navy of seven different classes of ship, where does the baseline of competencies across Branches and Specialisations lie? The issues around this question are less complex for some of our people – in the Support Branches – than they are for others – Technical Branches and Officers of the Watch. Whatever the final answer may be, the current approach - ‘we train every Sailor to serve in an ANZAC’ - is unlikely to be a sustainable definition of the basic competency requirements at the various specialist levels. This will have implications for the ways in which we train people and leads us to look at shorter and more focused courses. To reuse a phrase from another context, we will need to look at how we can best deliver ‘precision training.’

What will we change to achieve this goal? There are a large number of outcomes that we need to achieve if we are to reach the goal of having every position manned with the right person by December 2014. These reflect significant changes to the way that we currently do business. The main strategies and ‘business change outcomes’ are listed below; for full details, including links, ‘capability build outcomes’, associated initiatives and underlying assumptions, see the Strategic Journey Maps at Annex A:

Every position manned with the right person by December 2014 Strategy Build a competencybased organisation

Objectives (Business Change Outcomes) • Training courses aligned to Competency based NAVEST • Processes established to enable future competency development • Career Managers better managing Sailors • Trained HR Professionals • Non-sustainable trades eliminated and Branch structures rationalised • Competency-based organisation created • Data synthesis achieved – ‘Single source of the Truth’ • Time taken to become competent optimised

Accelerate and optimise training

• Training quality improved • FPTO non-core activities and associated costs reduced • Environment created in which our people’s expectations are met • Time to competence reduced • Formal training time reduced • Agile training solutions established

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Every position manned with the right person by December 2014 Strategy

Objectives (Business Change Outcomes)

Improve human resource management knowledge and systems

• Resource management improved • Career management improved • Ability to reward competence established • Personnel feel valued • Performance management system improved • Earliest realisation of the potential of individuals • Team and individual leadership behaviours improved • Ability to manage by fact increased • Clarity of HR processes established

Enhance retention drivers and improve recruitment capability

• Image of Navy improved • Churn management improved • Work/Life balance improved • Succession planning improved • Fitness for Sea and Operational Service improved • Job satisfaction increased • Job stability increased • Sufficient personnel recruited to sustain the Navy • Recruitment capability, marketing and employment branding improved

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Strategic Goal 2 Seven PROTECTOR ships delivering 100% of their capability by December 2009 Introducing the seven new ships to be delivered to the Navy under the aegis of Project PROTECTOR is a significant challenge facing the Navy – especially in terms of our ability to deliver MMC across the spectrum of operations. The Project has provided the Navy with significant challenges ranging from the complexity of the different Classes being built in different countries to addressing issues around capabilities and specifications to project delays – and everything having to be managed essentially from within an organisational structure and personnel numbers set up to support a fleet that is already in service. That these challenges have been addressed – and are continuing to be addressed – is due in no small measure to the outstanding work over the past few years in the Naval Staff and the Naval Support Command, by Navy personnel on Ministry of Defence project teams, in Whangarei, Williamstown and in Europe. Their efforts – along with those of MoD personnel - have provided a substantial trajectory for us to leverage off as the ‘steel hits the sea’. However, the goal is about more than just the ships. We need to have the right people in the right place at the right time, berths and services sorted out at the Naval Base, operational concepts defined, a good idea of the elements of the various levels of capability, maintenance philosophies resolved and good working relationships established with the wide range of multi-agency stakeholders in the Department of Conservation, Customs, Ministry of Fisheries, Police, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Maritime New Zealand – and others. We cannot forget, either, the requirement to ensure that a great relationship is established right at the outset with the communities with whom each of the ships will be uniquely associated. Just as important as what this Strategic Goal is, is what it is not. Critically, it’s about being ready to start generating the required level of operational capability (LOC) – it does not require us to be at the Directed Level of Capability (DLOC) across the new ships from Day One. We will be required to achieve DLOC in time – and we will need to be able to achieve the Operational Level of Capability (OLOC) within the agreed Response Times – but it is not the intention that we will be in this position the day we take delivery of the ships. However, we need to ensure we set ourselves a realistic target for getting these things achieved. And while there needs to be some stretch, the core characteristics of our introduction into service strategy will be ‘a cautious approach’ and ‘a safety focused’ approach. Inevitably, we will find the time it takes to achieve DLOC and demonstrate our ability to reach OLOC will vary across the classes of ships. The IPVs will take the shortest time. This is because, in large part, the operations they will conduct are not new to us. Following the same reasoning, it should be no surprise that CANTERBURY has

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presented us with significant challenges – to which the ship’s company have responded magnificently. The challenges of PROTECTOR provide significant risks to the Navy – principally around safety and reputation – but they also provide great opportunities. This Strategic Goal is about managing the risk around seven new ships and some new capabilities, and positioning ourselves to exploit the new opportunities they will bring – opportunities to transform a capable Navy into a versatile one.

What will we change to achieve this goal? There are a large number of outcomes that we need to achieve if we are to reach the goal of seven PROTECTOR ships delivering 100% of their capability by December 2009. These reflect significant capabilities that we have to establish. The main strategies and outcomes are listed below; for full details, refer to the PROTECTOR Introduction into Service Transition Plan, and associated outcomes maps, available online at http://projects/rd1/default.aspx

Seven PROTECTOR ships delivering 100% of their capability by December 2009 Strategy Establish the capability to conduct, command and control PPV operations

Objectives (Capability Build Outcomes) • Damage control capability established • Navigational capability established • Flying operations capability established • Communications capability established • Security management capability established • Amphibious operations capability established • Evaluation capability established • Doctrine, processes and operational employment capability established

Establish the capability to fill and manage PPV personnel complements

• Training developed and personnel identified • Manning concept established • Personnel policies and processes aligned and confirmed • Joint personnel roles defined • Posting management capability established

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Seven PROTECTOR ships delivering 100% of their capability by December 2009 Strategy Establish the capability to provide PPV in service support

Objectives (Capability Build Outcomes) • Infrastructure for personnel established • Shore services established • Berths and crane requirements established • Contracted ISS established • Maintenance philosophy established • Spares policy and provision established • Capability to accept and manage maintenance data established • Major subcontractor support established

Establish the capability to manage PPV administration

• Embarked forces personnel policies established

Establish the capability to test, evaluate and manage PPV acceptance

• Capability to support testing and evaluation established

• PPVs capable to receive and manage documentation • Standing Orders and Standard Operating Procedures established

• Capability to undertake Cat 1 to 5 testing and evaluation established • Capability to identify and manage safety(risk) issues

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Strategic Goal 3 Credible and sustainable Maritime Military Capability across the spectrum of operations in New Zealand and overseas As encapsulated in our Mission, our usefulness to CDF – and to the government and country – lies in our ability to deliver Maritime Military Capability (MMC) across the spectrum of operations at the level required, when it is required and where it is required. Across the Versatile Fleet that we will have this means that we will strive to achieve and maintain the relevant ‘operational viability’ for each ship and force element8. It means, too, that we need to maintain this Goal in our sights way out into the future. This is because the process that starts off the disposal of one ship and the introduction into service of its replacement takes years – not months or weeks. We are assessed against this requirement on an annual basis by our ability to achieve with our Force Elements a specified level of operational capability relative to an operational scenario. The level is normally at the Directed Level of Capability (DLOC) with an associated Response Time (RT). Occasionally, however, Force Elements are required to achieve the Operational Level of Capability (OLOC) – the level required when they are actually engaged on operations. The critical point here is that DLOC has no usefulness without OLOC. That is, the important element is not that a ship, for example, can be held at DLOC, but that it can move to OLOC when required to do so. The priority for generating credible and sustainable Maritime Military Capability is to ensure that the ANZAC frigates are able to carry out the range of tasks expected of them – and to ensure they have the types of capabilities required to meet defence policy imperatives. Consequently, the PSU and SDU are important and key enabling projects in the context of this Goal. The Navy’s direct combat capability lies with the ANZACs – and the SH2G Seasprite helicopters. However, the application of this capability is dependent on four other related capabilities – the ability to exchange information with other units so that ‘maritime domain’ or ‘situational awareness’ is achieved - because this enables effective C2 and creates manoeuvre space for the ships; the ability to operate within the prevailing C2 framework because this enables the actions required to generate the desired effects; the ability, from within organic capabilities, to generate the required effects, and the capabilities required to defend the ships against threats so that they are not a liability to coalition partners. 8

‘Operational Viability’ is the level of MMC that a ship or FE is able to deliver to achieve the required operational effect(s). ‘Combat Viability’ is a sub set of ‘operational viability’. Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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There are presently risks around all of these capabilities that need to be addressed in the short term. All this does not mean that the other ships – and ‘force elements’ - are not important too – they are. In the sorts of operations the Navy can expect to get involved in today’s operational environment, there is a requirement for ‘operational viability’ across the spectrum of operations; from the ‘hard edge’ of lethal force on the right of the spectrum down to the ‘soft edge’ of benign force at the left. This means that the context in which we now need to maintain our level of capability is much broader and more complex than it has been in the past. Not only do we have to plan to work with coalition military partners, we have to plan to work with other government agencies and non-governmental organisations. To complicate matters further, the threat environment that we may be required to operate in is likely to be characterised by asymmetric threats in addition to symmetric threats. The same issues face us in working out how best to provide technical and supply chain support. Each of the ship classes has different imperatives when the complexity of shipboard equipment is considered, whether it is Specialist Military Equipment (SME) or Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS). There are different risks that can be carried around availability of say, an ANZAC on operations, compared to an IPV; a number of other factors need to be taken into account too. It is not sustainable for the same support standards to be applied to all ships – in many areas it will be more appropriate to take a class-based approach and in some a systems-based approach within a class context. The ANZACs will not set the Navy standard, and as a result, other measures will have to be adopted. We need to ensure that our engineering and support processes exploit the different risk frameworks that sit around each of the seven classes of ships that we will have. As a simple example, more risk can be accepted around the availability of an IPV for multi-agency tasks than will be accepted around the availability of an ANZAC for an operational deployment. The Navy has to be ready now for an array of potential operations that include: • • • • • • • • •

Combat operations with the ANZACs and SH2Gs Fleet support operations with ENDEAVOUR Amphibious sealift operations with CANTERBURY Military hydrography and theatre entry, or Rapid Environmental Assessment (REA), operations with RESOLUTION and the Defence Hydrographic Support Unit MCM operations with MANAWANUI and the Operational Diving Team (ODT) Multi-agency operations with the OPVs and IPVs Search and Rescue (SAR) with all ships Coalition maritime and ‘joint’ operations with all ships Defence diplomacy operations with all ships

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MMC is delivered by ships and their systems – and by their Sailors giving effect to their training and using what are commonly called tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs), to exploit the capability inherent in the platform. The people and TTPs components of capability are especially important given that the range of capabilities we have is delivered from a fleet of 13 ships of seven different classes. This is a uniquely disparate fleet configuration for a Navy of our size. It presents significant people and TTP challenges. Sailors today require – and expect - leaders at sea who are able to command – and who are able to lead within a command context. The Navy’s situational leadership model supports these requirements. We must ensure, too, that we do not become a Navy of two distinct types – a ‘big ship Navy’ that is all ‘spit and polish’ and a ‘small ship Navy’ that is all ‘long hair and gumboots’.. Consequently, it is the intention that - where it makes sense and is practical - the call will be ‘One Navy – One Standard’. This will not only serve to ensure that important standards around performance – how we do our jobs, how we behave and how we align ourselves with our Core Values – will be maintained, it will also make it easier for the Maritime Operational Evaluation Team (MOET) to play their critical role in embedding common operational standards across the Fleet. This Strategic Goal acknowledges that ships or people acting alone do not provide MMC. Rather, it sets out to address the combat viability Key Strategic Challenge from the position that it is delivered by ships and people acting together – linked by TTPs – as an MMC delivery system. In the past this Goal has focused solely on delivering the hard and kinetic effects of MMC. We now need to ensure we incorporate the soft effects. That is, those capabilities that allow us to engage effectively in what is variously called ‘Defence Diplomacy’ or ‘Strategic Shaping’ operations. Key here are the credibility of our ships – as components of a professional and capable Navy – and their presence overseas - and the unique New Zealand characteristics of our sailors. Ultimately, we need to leverage off the sea, and the shared experience of it, to build bridges with those Navies that are important in helping us promote and protect the nation’s interests. Fundamentally, though, the quality of our Navy to Navy relationships around the world depends on individuals mutually agreeing that the relationship is worthwhile. The Navy’s strategic direction for Defence Diplomacy and Strategic Shaping Operations will be articulated in a separate Restricted plan that is linked to Strategic Goal 39.

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This plan is yet to be developed. Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

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What will we change to achieve this goal? There are a large number of investments in ships, systems, and equipment that we intend and in many cases, hope - to make if we are to reach the goal of having credible and sustainable Maritime Military Capability across the spectrum of operations in New Zealand and overseas. There are also some changes planned in how we manage capability. MMC is the most expensive part of the Navy’s business, and therefore the area that we face the greatest constraints. As a result, the Strategic Journey Maps at Annex A show a large number of aspirations, as well as firm plans. The aspirations communicate some of the areas that, if resources become less constrained, we would prefer to invest in. Below is a list of some of the strategies contributing to Strategic Goal 3:

Credible and sustainable Maritime Military Capability across the spectrum of operations in New Zealand and overseas Strategies Upgrade ANZAC Class platform systems Upgrade ANZAC Class self defence capability Upgrade and refurbish ANZAC Class CIWS Define and acquire Future Naval Combat Force Define and acquire Future Naval Replenishment and Support Force

Objectives (Capability Outcomes) • Continuous operation and platform survivability in all environmental conditions

• Viable and credible own and force defence against a variety of threats

• Modern, viable and credible Next Generation Naval Combat Force (2025 to 2050)

• Modern, viable and credible Next Generation NSF (2016 to 2046)

Upgrade/replace SH2G(NZ) Seasprite helicopters

• Modern, viable and credible organic airborne ISR and weapon system

Define and acquire Future Naval Diving/MCM/Hydrographic Afloat capability

• Modern, viable and credible Next Generation capability (2015 to 2045)

Introduce, enhance or upgrade ESM, CESM, data links, GCCS-M and radars

• Improved capability to collect and share intelligence, and conduct surveillance and reconnaissance to support own and other force elements

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Credible and sustainable Maritime Military Capability across the spectrum of operations in New Zealand and overseas Strategies Improve the introduction and exploitation of MMC

Objectives (Capability Outcomes) • Capability investment optimised • Strong relationships of trust with key stakeholders established • Agility in responding to rapidly changing technologies, threats or immediate operational requirements increased • Ability to measure and prove the military effect of MMC immediately after introduction established • Collective training and evaluation capability improved

Improve the maintenance and support of MMC

• Programme of estate investment optimised for sustainability

Regenerate seamanship skills in the Navy

• Position at the Cdr level for a FXO established

• Most effective and efficient long-term model for supporting the fleet established

• Seamanship training reviewed – initial and ongoing – across the Navy • Seamanship skill level across the Navy systematically monitored and evaluated • Navy Safety Policy integrated into evaluation of seamanship activities and incidents in the Fleet

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Strategic Goal 4 Excellent performance measurement, management and continuous improvement approaches by December 2011 Be it our people, resources, leadership, logistics, work systems, collective training or ultimate outputs, we need to be excellent at gathering and interpreting data and information. We need to be excellent at gaining insights and making judgements that lead to the best possible decisions and actions. And, we need to continuously improve everything we do – so long as it is something we need to continue doing. Otherwise, a continuous improvement culture means that we stop doing it. This goal recognises that to have excellent operations, and to help us attract and retain excellent people, we need to be excellent at managing the organisation as a whole, and in all its parts. We need to understand how the Navy works as a complex system, how to add value, and where and how to intervene. To do this we need to excel at strategic management, information management, performance measurement and management, risk management, safety management and process management. We need to excel at programme and project management, and we need to excel at realising the benefits of the changes that we make. Some of the steps towards excelling in these areas will be revolutionary in nature; most will be evolutionary, as we continuously improve what we do. A key component of this approach will be the continued reinvigoration of the Naval Excellence (Nx) programme. After a journey of 10 years the Navy’s approach to Nx is now starting to mature. In its essence it is not solely about using the Baldrige Criteria as a performance excellence tool. Rather, it is about embedding a continuous improvement and ‘inquisitive’ culture into the Navy. The Baldrige Criteria are one tool – and an important one - in the toolbox that we will use. They are an important part of this Strategic Goal. Equally important is the capability to manage and share information – deriving capability from information networks - and a critical part of management information is performance measurement. We have made large strides already, but the more we mature, the more we realise that we have further to go. The ultimate outcome of achieving this goal will be a more efficient and more effective Navy. But we must be careful we get the balance right. All organisations have a responsibility to strive for a balance between efficiency and effectiveness in the use of resources. However, the aim is not an absolute balance – it is the right relative balance. In our case, the organisational weight of balance is more towards effectiveness than it is towards efficiency. Nevertheless, it is important to realise that at the tactical level it is

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weighted more to effectiveness by a far larger margin that it is at the strategic level – where the difference in weighting is relatively narrow. This is because, in many cases, decisions about resources will have a direct impact on the survival of those Sailors we send into harm’s way. The closer to the ‘front line’ the more direct the impact will be. That is the nature of our Mission – and what we do – and it means that more often than not we define ‘maximise’ from an effectiveness perspective rather than from an efficiency one. However, this should never be taken to mean that efficiency considerations are irrelevant and given no weight at all. This is an important point because the reality is that we will never have as much resource as we want or require – or think we want or require. Consequently, we must become excellent at managing trade offs – of capability levels and resource commitments - and making informed and transparent decisions to maximise the effect we achieve for the resources we invest. This will require a systematic approach to making these sorts of decisions; an approach deployed to those parts of the Navy that need to use it.

What will we change to achieve this goal? There are a large number of outcomes that we need to achieve if we are to reach the goal of excellent performance measurement, management and continuous improvement approaches by December 2011. The main strategies and ‘business change outcomes’ are listed below; for full details, including links, ‘capability build outcomes’, associated initiatives and underlying assumptions, see the Strategic Journey Maps at Annex A:

Excellent performance measurement, management and continuous improvement approaches by December 2011 Strategy Reinvigorate Naval Excellence

Objectives (Business Change Outcomes) • Training properly tailored and targeted • Criteria for Performance Excellence core values and concepts understood, valued and applied • Management capacity and competence improved • Successful Navy business practices shared

Enhance Measurement, Analysis and Assessment Capabilities

• Comparison and projection of performance improved

Establish Governance and Support for Investment in Change

• Resourcing of change initiatives improved

• Ability to measure the Navy ‘bottom line’ across the spectrum of operations established • Analysis and reporting improved

• Implementation of programmes and projects improved • Improvement through innovation increased • Risks reduced and risk management improved • Ability to prioritise and select investments improved

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Excellent performance measurement, management and continuous improvement approaches by December 2011 Strategy Establish Network Enabled Capability Focused on the Fleet

Objectives (Business Change Outcomes) • Quality operational information available on demand to the Naval Patrol Force (NPF) • NPF administration and reporting optimised • Situational awareness increased • Shore support improved

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Strategic Goal 5 The majority of New Zealanders understanding the benefits that we bring to the Nation through the exploitation of Maritime Military Capability by December 2011 Fundamentally, this Strategic Goal is about the Navy’s reputation with New Zealanders and being able - in a quantifiable way - to show how we add real value to New Zealand. It is also about knowing where on the ‘good to bad reputation’ spectrum we sit. A good reputation is important because the attitude of young New Zealanders - and their parents – towards the Navy as a career option will be influenced and shaped by our reputation. If we cannot change existing stereotypes held by many New Zealanders – and in some cases firmly held - we will struggle to have people join us in the numbers we require. It is important, too, so that people inside the Navy feel that what they do is valued by other New Zealanders. If they believe that what they are doing is worthwhile, then this may be a key factor that persuades them to stay in the Navy. However, this Goal goes beyond reputation – which may be based on such things as what New Zealanders think of how our Sailors behave. It aims to give New Zealanders an understanding of what we do through the delivery of MMC and why, from a national perspective, we do it – what our contribution to the country actually is. It is inevitable that New Zealanders will, in general, judge us by our contribution to the country’s security – this will be in terms of our performance - and by our behaviour as an organisation and as Sailors (te iwi heremana). Our Mission statement deals with our performance dimensions. While the CDF is one of our principal customers, our Mission identifies that we contribute to the prosperity and security of all New Zealanders. It is important that we are able to demonstrate either that we are achieving this – or that, at the very least, New Zealanders believe we are indeed contributing to these outcomes. If we are to have any chance of success in this area, then New Zealanders need to know what we do – and, ideally, have some understanding of what we do. This second dimension will be the most difficult to achieve, and will require a more concerted effort, than the ‘know’ dimension. People will most easily and effectively get to know us by seeing us, meeting us, or reading about us in press releases. To develop understanding, we need to build on these by giving people the opportunity to meet and talk to our Sailors and to give them access to comprehensive information on the key elements of our Mission Statement.

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Our behaviour as Sailors will be subject to close scrutiny – especially if we provide reasons for New Zealanders to believe that the standard we have set for ourselves is a relatively low one – and that our Core Values are not strongly held measures. Our organisational behaviour is likely to judged against a number of criteria. In this regard, the Baldrige Criteria provide a very good framework for us to know what we need to do to be judged an excellent organisation. We will really be the best small-nation Navy in the world when it is not only us who believe we are that, but when our view is shared by other New Zealanders on the basis of how we perform and how we behave. That is why this is an important Strategic Goal.

What will we change to achieve this goal? There are a large number of outcomes that we need to achieve if we are to reach the goal of the majority of New Zealanders understanding the benefits that we bring to the Nation through the exploitation of Maritime Military Capability by December 2011. The main strategies and ‘business change outcomes’ are listed below; for full details, including links, ‘capability build outcomes’, associated initiatives and underlying assumptions, see the Strategic Journey Maps at Annex A:

The majority of New Zealanders understanding the benefits that we bring to the Nation through the exploitation of Maritime Military Capability by December 2011 Strategy

Objectives (Business Change Outcomes)

Build and enhance community networks

• Effectiveness of Resident and Honorary Naval Officers improved

Establish Reputation Management governance

• Web management enhanced

Develop and enhance reputationbuilding Initiatives and capabilities

• Qualitative and quantitative assessment of reputation improved

• Means of engagement inside the community improved

• Synergies between Recruiting, Museum, Defence Public Relations Unit and Naval Reputation Management exploited

• Every sailor and civilian equipped and competent to deliver a consistent message • A systematic reputation management approach established • A long-term coordinated programme of activities and initiatives implemented

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What principles should we be governed by? Once the goals are set, the more creative and even more challenging part is to develop strategies that will enable us to reach our goal – and address the challenges that stand in the way. The goal setting is largely ‘top down’, but the creation of strategies is very often ‘bottom up’ – everyone has a role to play in contributing to developing and deciding on the pathways. In support of organisational alignment the strategies must be developed within ‘boundaries of manoeuvre’ which are established by organisational governing principles. These principles are ‘bands of acceptable organisational behaviour ‘ that encapsulate senior leadership strategic intent and direction, provide a broad and expansive behavioural context around the ‘inner core’ defined narrowly by the Core Values and Core Purpose. Consequently, they enable a creative and innovative approach to strategy development. The following governing principles were used when the 2007 to 2025 Strategic Plan was developed, and should continue to be referred to when interpreting the Plan, or when making adjustments as we move towards our Vision. •

Today’s Capable Navy will become Tomorrow’s Versatile Navy. The most immediate and exciting challenge facing the Navy over the next year is the introduction of the PROTECTOR fleet while continuing to deliver current Outputs. We must do this and generate an integrated force of the current fleet and the seven new ships, which provides relevant and credible capability across the spectrum of operations.



‘Productivity’ will be improved through Process Improvement. It is critical that the Navy achieves ‘productivity’ improvements in terms of both personnel and platforms. In the case of personnel this particularly means that time under training must be reduced and that training is aligned with maintenance/operating philosophies. However, these changes are not about ‘making our people work harder’. They are more about opening up further the windows through which quality of life and personal development opportunities can be accessed. It also means that process times for complaints, promotions, discipline – and the like – must be substantially reduced. In the case of platforms it means that vessel availability for operational tasking is aligned to the reality that much of the fleet is, in both engineering and logistical contexts, commercial – and that CCP imperatives must fit in with maintenance imperatives.



Performance Measurement is key to Performance Improvement. It is very important that performance is measured. However, measures must be relevant; that is, the right things must be measured – not just those things already being measured. They must also be timely, and implemented in a temporal context – that is, the principal value of measures is their facility to be converted, over time, into knowledge of how an organisation is performing relative to targets – and where real ‘value added’ can be exploited out of performance improvement. Measurement will motivate our people on the improvement journey and will make it more relevant to them.



Professionalism is a defining Characteristic of the Navy. The Navy must be a professional military service. This means that our people and our equipment are credible and relevant to the contemporary geo-strategic environment and envisioned concept of operations. To achieve this requires appropriate equipment, well-trained, motivated, disciplined and resilient people, and appropriate doctrine, tactics, techniques and procedures. In the modern Navy professionalism is required in both ‘the profession of arms’ and ‘the management of organisations’.

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Right People are the key to Excellence. People are important to the Navy – but the right people are the most important people. It is, after all, people who exploit the capability inherent in equipment and in systems. As a corollary to this, people make varying contributions to the Navy and so there is a need to be able to manage personnel uniquely in terms of the career and personal opportunities that naval service provides.



Reputation Matters. Having the right reputation is critical to the Navy becoming a trusted organisation within the NZDF, government and the wider community. Management and maintenance of the Navy’s reputation is to be a key area of attention. More than anything else it is the behaviour of all of us that defines the Navy’s reputation. An area of particular focus here is to ensure that substance abuse is effectively managed. This means that our people must be educated into the risks around abuse, that our rules must be enforced, and that the organisational environment facilitates appropriate behaviours around, in particular, the use of tobacco and alcohol.



Personnel Structure must be Relevant to the Navy we have – not the Navy we had. The Navy must have the right personnel structures to ensure that R3 – right person, right place, and right time – can be progressed to R4 – right person, right place, right time, and right cost. RF numbers and ranks in branches, and the branches, required to operate and support the present force structure is not necessarily the right structure to man the new fleet. Personnel structures will need to be reviewed to ensure that the fit is right between personnel and force structure.



Quality of Life Matters to our People. High achieving organisations are characterised by people with high morale. This requires us to provide effective leaders who model and deploy the Navy’s Core Values and who generate and support an organisational core culture that recognises the fundamental importance of delivering military capability in defining the Navy. It means celebrating success, understanding that mistakes are an opportunity to learn and not an excuse to indulge in retribution, and that hard work needs to be balanced by fun – and it means recognising that our Sailors depend on the support of families, partners and friends outside the Navy.



In a ‘management’ context the Navy will be a ‘Situational’ Organisation. All of our training and much of what we do reinforces the value of ‘standard operating procedures’ or SOPs. However, notwithstanding their undoubted benefits, SOPs can lead to ineffective personnel and maintenance processes – and generate significant organisational overhead. In many cases SOPs will be appropriate but in many, too, processes aligned with the situation – situational processes - will be better. The reality is that in the future, world-class organisations will generate situational processes that provide a menu of options to support organisational innovation and agility. The Navy will be one of those organisations around personnel and material (technical and supply chain) management processes.



In an ‘operational’ context, the Navy will be a ‘One Way’ Organisation. A standard way of doing things reduces training overhead and supports a safety culture. However, there is a tension between a ‘one way’ approach and a ‘situational’ approach to processes. In the Navy, the focus of the first approach will be in operations and in other areas where its advantages clearly outweigh any benefits of the second approach. In the Fleet the ‘one way’ approach has an added advantage of easing the transfer of personnel between ships and supports the efforts of the MOET; particularly in a Navy of 13 ships of seven different classes.

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

34

To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao



Our personnel management approach should be ‘developmental’ and not ‘judgemental’. We need to be an organisation that build people not one that brings them down. Consequently, rather than focussing on negative aspects of personnel performance we need to develop capacity and capability to allow us to focus on those areas which will enable our personnel to perform beyond their potential.

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

35

To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Deployment, Implementation, Evaluation and Celebration Deployment The goals and strategies in this Strategic Plan need to be deployed through the Navy and implemented, and progress will need to be evaluated. We need to demonstrate that we are an organisation that can both plan and execute the plan – rather than one that plans and ignores the plan. Deployment of the Strategic Plan, not necessarily in detail, but rather in broad outline, is a senior leadership responsibility. We are not embarking on the course it sets out so that the senior leaders can make the journey by themselves – because, after all, the journey is one for the whole Navy to embark upon. Furthermore, if the majority of people in the Navy have no idea of where we are heading – or how we plan to get there – why should there be an expectation that they will come along? Consequently, Navy wide deployment of this Strategic plan is an important leadership responsibility.

Implementation The Strategic Plan will, in effect, be implemented through the implementation of strategies – which link the means we have available with the ends we are aiming for within an acceptable level of risk. The strategies that we will all be involved in implementing, along with objectives that will mark progress, like waypoints along a ‘navtrack’, are at Annex A. As we proceed, some strategies are likely to be added, some will be modified, and some might be deleted altogether. This is how things work in a ‘learning organisation’ and is consistent with the Navy SMP principles. The rationale for strategies, the benefits that they will produce, and interrelationships between pieces of work, are presented in what are termed ‘Strategic Journey Maps’ (SJMs). These maps help with the development of strategies, and explain how we expect the strategies to work and unfold over time. Crucially, they also highlight assumptions (risks) that need to be monitored and managed if the strategies are to succeed. We will implement the strategies in two principal ways. In the first, where a strategy is something that clearly has a beginning and an end, and is unique or different from our normal activities, we will plan and manage implementation by following tried and true project management disciplines. In the second, where objectives or tasks can be implemented through normal operational processes, or ‘business as usual’ activities, then these are to be used.

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

36

To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Evaluation Evaluation of progress against plans will be made regularly, at least three times a year, and various tools will be used to ‘fix’ our position relative to the planned track. This will include monitoring the Navy’s Performance Measurement Framework, and monitoring reporting tools that will be specifically tailored to groups of strategies that will be managed as programmes. A major part of this will be the measuring and monitoring of the achievement of actual results, and not only the achievement of change, tasks or activities. In other words, our rate of improvement as well as structural and process changes will be monitored. In the past we have tended to pay too much attention to the second – and virtually none to the first.

Celebration We need, too, to ensure that where recognition is due then it is given – and get the message out that mistakes often provide opportunities to learn – but we only want to have to learn the lesson once. As we achieve our small and large objectives, and our actual goals, we will celebrate our success in an appropriate way. Ultimately, if we are to move collectively on the journey to be the best small-nation Navy in the world then we must provide a picture of our progress along the track. We as Sailors are not unique in wishing to know where we are – especially in relation to a destination. We will also celebrate changes and adjustments, and even mistakes where there are great lessons to be learned from them.

Linkage with Other Plans This Strategic Plan is to be used to inform our other plans, such as our Annual Plan, Infrastructure Development Plan, and Functional Area Plans. For example, the Nx Office produces the RNZN Annual Plan, which consists of the next annual ‘slice’ of the Strategic Plan, in addition to business plans focused on output delivery for each functional area.

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

37

To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World

Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Annex A – RNZN Strategic Journey Maps

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

A1

Strategic Goal 1 – Every position manned with the right person by 2014 1 Jul 2007

All PROTECTOR ships delivered and crewed

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2012

1 Jul 2011

1.1.25 Build processes into HR and Training Systems [CHR/CTQR] [CFPT to monitor & report to DCN]

1.1.37 Competency Project - Identify and validate current established PL competencies; - Identify competencies delivered by current courses; - Conduct Gap Analysis of all RNZN courses- Redevelop & align training courses to deliver required competencies [CTQR]

1 Jul 2014

1 Jul 2013

1.1.2 Review efficacy of VR contribution to the NPF/RNZN outputs

1.1.21 Develop Competency Tools for career Managers and Sailors (including VR) [CTQR]

1.1.27 Establish Comp. Mgt. Cell [CTQR]

Build a Competency-based Organisation

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2009

1.1.17 Sustainable processes to enable future competency development

1.1.3 Created Competency Based organisation

1.1.29 Develop Competency based NAVEST [CHR]

1.1.15 Competency based NAVEST Established

Right Person

1.1.13 Training courses aligned to competency based NAVEST

1.1.19 Increased clarity in what should be trained

1.1.33 Cassandra - Restructure branch/trades to meet competency based NAVEST. Includes review of Officer Branch structure , and review of all Ratings’ Branches [DNSPP]

1.1.1 Career Manager can better manage Sailors

1.1.9 Optimised time taken to become competent

1.1.5 Trained HR Professionals

Links to

1.1 Sailors can manage own careers

e at an being mad “decisions l” ve le te appropria

1.1 Optimally trained person

1.1.35 Implement MT(P) Recovery Strategy “Reducing Demand” Programme [CPT(Tech)] 1.1.7 Data synthesis – single source of 1.1.11 Eliminated “Truth” non-sustainable trades, un-necessary From “Incr. training. ability to Rationalised Branch Structure undertake 1.2.13 Develop competencies using appropriate tools and solutions that deliver blended training products [CTQR] research”

1.1.23 Identify, analyse and develop training courses/modules to deliver the required HR Professional competencies within FPTO & Pers Division [CHR]

1.2 For Navy: No overtraining, reduced cost/ overhead, increased throughput, reduced wastage, reduced manpower in schools

1.2.17 Implement a Learning Management System, including E-Learning [CTQR] 1.2.8 Develop agile training content and packages for RNZNVR personnel iaw 1.2.7 Agile RNZNVR training review [CNR] Training Solutions with ability to optimise training delivery

Accelerate and Optimise Training

1.2.19 Implement a Marine Engineering Synthetic Training Environment (MESTE) [CPT(Tech)] 1.2.11 Optimisation of existing assets

1.2.3 Time-to-competence reduced Operating Certificates and professional course achievement Accelerated (SEE MTP Recovery Strategy)

1.2.23 Implement MT Recovery Strategy “Accelerating and Optimising Training” Programme [CPT(Tech)] 1.2.9 Reduce FPTO non-core activities and associated costs

1.2.25 Establish Group Training Centres

1.2.1 Reduced formal training time; Improved quality of training

1. STRATEGIC GOAL 1 Every position manned with the right person by 2014

1.2 For Sailors: Reduced time to competency, Decreased churn

1.2.29 Re Develop FPTO facilities/ real estate (see Navy IDP 1.7: WTC Redevelopment, 2.3: Branch Training Centre [CO PHL], 2.4: LDGHQ, 2.5: SATU Relocation, and 2.6: LDGTF) [ACN(C)]

1.2.15 Environment created in which our people’s and stakeholders’ expectations are met

1.3.33 Review and redefine HR levels of authority

1.3.17 Improved Career Management

Links to improved rete ntion etc

1.3.21 Decisions being made at an appropriate level 1.3.11 Improved Performance Management system

1.3.35 Improve DIFOTIS of our Performance Mgt System [CHR]

AMLU actions improvements on time

1.3.3 Staff Feel Valued

on retenti ff roved ta to imp onnel to s s k in rs L ed pe avy in a tr f N o the

1.3.1 Increased ability to manage by fact and thereby make the right HR decisions

1.3.25 Review/Redesign PCR system, and all ratings service record documents [CHR]

1.3.37 Remove impediments to Rating promotion [CHR] 1.3.5 Earliest realisation of individuals potential

1.3.38 Remove impediments to Officer promotion [DNOCM] 1.3.19 Establish 360 multi-rater programme at career milestones [DNSPP]

1.3.15 Develop and Improve Personal Development Programmes [CLD]

1.3.13 Improved team and individual leadership behaviours 1.3 High Performance Teams

1.3.27 Identify, Map then review and validate all proposed amendments to HR Processes [CHR/DNPP]

1 Jul 2007

c tention et

1.3.9 Ability to Reward Competence

su Link cc s es to si im on p pl rov an ed ni ng

1.3.31 Create FPTO PMF

1.3.23 Improved Resource Management

e proved R Link to Im

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2009

1.3.7 Greater clarity of HR Processes

ion ss ce uc dS ve g pro nin Im Plan to ks Lin

Improve Human Resource Management Knowledge and Processes

1.3.29 PAN RNZN HR PMF

1.2.5 Improved Image

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

1 Jul 2012

1 Jul 2013

1 Jul 2014

Strategic Goal 1 – Every position manned with the right person by 2014 All PROTECTOR ships delivered and crewed

1 Jul 2007

Create a Mediumterm Recruitme nt Marketing Strategy

1 Jul 2008 1 Jul 2009 mme “Develop progra es To / from SG5 sit et case for intern and business upgrade 1.4.43 Create effective use of online space through restructuring www.navy.mil architecture, utilising online job sites, hosting consumer-centric content, developing search engines and online job-fit tools [HRO(Rec)] 1.4.45 Improve marketing campaign efforts through developing advertising frameworks, rationalising materials, capitalising on under utilised markets, and developing a plan to target ‘like minded’ individuals [HRO(Rec)] 1.4.47 Improve employment branding efforts through aligning with Navy employment brand values, establishing marketing controls, and informing internal stakeholders [HRO(Rec)]

1 Jul 2010

1.4.1 Better Work Life Balance 1.4.9 Sufficient Pers Recruited to sustain the Navy

1.4.31 Improved Recruitment Ability 1.4.51 Increased capability to undertake research

1.4.40 Improved ability to make informed decisions and manage by fact

1.4.3 Increased Job Satisfaction 1.4.55 Implement MT Recovery Strategy “Improving Recruitment and Remuneration” Programme [CPT(Tech)]

1.4.57 Implement MT Recovery Strategy “Reducing Workload at Sea and Increasing Career Satisfaction” Programme [CPT(Tech)]

1.4.7 Improved Churn Management

1.4.35 Identify, prioritise and implement initiatives to address retention/attrition drivers [DNPP] 1.4.59 Identify attrition and retention drivers for all trades

1.4.37 Identify key positions for Succession Planning [CPT(Ops)/DNOP]

1.4.61 Review FFSea data to determine key areas for improvement

1.4.63 Review FFOS data to determine key areas for improvement

n Li

fro

m

Ca

Right Person

1. STRATEGIC GOAL 1 Every position manned with the right person by 2014

1.4.5 Staff Feel Valued

1.4.13 Increased/ Improved Succession Planning Links to Improved Career Management

1.4 41 Develop and implement a suite of initiatives to address key FFOS/ FFSea issues [CHR]

k

ed ov pr m I

e re

t en m ge a an rM

1.4 Improved Retention of trained personnel to staff the Navy

1.4.11 Increased Job Stability

1.4.19 Increase in behaviours aligned with Navy core values

1.4.27 Reinvigorate PDB [CO PHL]

1 Jul 2014

To Improved recruitme nt ability

Enhance Retention Drivers and Improve Recruiting Capability

1.4.49 Improve Navy recruitment capability through restructuring HQ and field units, growing recruiter ability, attracting the right recruiters, and establishment of structures for the provision of specialist advice [HRO(Rec)]

1.4.53 Establish an FPTO HR research cell

1 Jul 2013

1 Jul 2012

1 Jul 2011

1.4.23 Improved FFOS/FFSea

1.4.15 Improved Image 1.4.39 Review of Oral Surgery/Dental Services to the NZDF [COL Trengrove] 1.4.65 Construct New DNB South Yard Dining Facility (IDP 1.6) [CO PHL]

1.4.17 Environment created in which our people’s and stakeholders’ expectations are met

1.4.25 Establish NSCHQ Building (IDP 2.1) [ACN(C)] 1.4.27 South Yard Accommodation Phase 1 and 2 (IDP 3.1 and 3.3) [ACN(C)]

Assumptions

1.4.29 Narrowneck Multi Unit Accommodation (IDP 3.2, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7) [ACN(C)]

1.1 Competency based system will improve motivation

1.2 Professional and Command competency will continue to be aligned (Excluding 1.1.33 Cassandra)

1.3 Personnel will embrace the new training paradigm

1.4 There will be a tri-svc competency based Reporting Mechanism developed

1.5 Existing HR / IT systems can be upgraded / connected

1.6 Out sourcing will not mean decreased control over training and competency level trained to

High Risk 1.7 DTP does not constrain S/S Programmes

1.8 Funding will be available for all planned initiatives

1.9 Resources to do the work will be available

Medium Risk

Measures

Low Risk

FFOS / FFSS

55% / 63%

60% / 65%

60% / 67%

66% / 73%

72% / 79%

78% / 85%

84% / 90%

90% / 90%

% Sea MPE Right Rank Right Trade

82%

85%

85%

88%

91%

94%

97%

100%

% Shore MPE Right Rank Right Trade

60%

64%

64%

68%

76%

84%

92%

100%

Attrition Rate

15.25%

14.5%

14.5%

14%

13.5%

13.5%

13%

12.5%

Recruitment Rate

87%

85%

85%

88%

90%

91%

91%

91%

1 Jul 2007

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2009

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

1 Jul 2012

1 Jul 2013

1 Jul 2014

Strategic Goal 3 - Credible and sustainable Maritime Military Capability across the spectrum of operations in New Zealand and overseas 1 Jul 2007

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2009

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

1 Jul 2012

1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2015 MAN Decomm

3.1.37 Future Navy Personnel Continuous Competency and Structure operation and Review platform survivability in all environmental conditions 3.1.9 3.1.21 Conduct Future Naval Combat Force Future Capability study NCF Known

3.1.45 Upgrade ANZAC Class Platform Systems $30m $30m

Significant or Major New, Replacement or Enhanced Capability

END Decomm

1 Jul 2021

1 Jul 2024 ANZACs Decomm

3.1.7 Acquire Future Naval Combat Force

3.1.1 Modern, viable and credible Next Generation NCF (2025 to 2050)

3.1.33 Upgrade ANZAC Class Self Defence Capability 3.1.19 $500m Navy’s next combat system 3.1.31 Viable and credible own and force defence against a variety of threats

3.1.47 Upgrade, Refurbish and integrate into ship, ANZAC Class CIWS $25m

3.1.11 Replace NZDF Torpedos (CP Major)

3.1.39 Improved Anti-Ship Missile Defence 3.1.49 Introduce Maritime UAVs (Small)

3.1.15 Modern, viable and credible organic airborne ISR and weapon system

Personnel Competency and Structure Planning

3.1.43 Conduct Future Naval Replenishment and Support Capability study

3. STRATEGIC GOAL 3 – Credible and sustainable Maritime Military Capability Ability to react across the spectrum of quickly to changing operations operational demands in New Zealand (RESPONSIVE) and overseas

3.1.13 Upgrade/replace SH-2G(NZ) Seasprites (mid-life) $176M

3.1.35 Introduce Maritime UAVs (Medium)

3.1.29 Future Afloat support capability known

3.1 Capability to perform many tasks in many different environments (VERSATILE)

3.1.23 Acquire Future Naval Replenishment and Support Force $250m (estimated for 2013 dollars)

3.1.3 Modern, viable and credible Next Generation NSF (2016 to 2046)

Ability to deliver what is required, when it is required (EFFECTIVE)

Personnel Competency and Structure Planning

3.1.41 Conduct Future Naval Diving/MCM/ Hydrographic Afloat Support Capability study

3.1.27 Future afloat diving/ MCM/Hydro MCM support capability known

3.1.51 Introduce, Enhance or Upgrade ESM, CESM, Data Links, GCCS-M, Radars (Multiple Projects – see each capability stream)

3.1.17 Acquire Future Naval Diving/MCM/ Hydrographic Afloat Capability $120m

3.1.25 Ability to collect and share intelligence, & conduct surveillance and reconnaissance to support Own and other Force Elements

Capability Build Initiatives (Aspirations)

3.1.5 Modern, viable and credible Next Generation Diving, Hydrographic and MCM Force (2015 to 2045)

Capability Build Initiatives Capability Build Outcomes Business Change Initiatives Business Change Outcomes Customer Value Outcomes

Metrics

Assumptions

Final Business Outcomes 3.1.1 All RNZN ships remain serviceable until expected decomissioning date

3.1.2 ANZAC class shared spares pool maintained between NZ/AUS

1 Jul 2008

3.1.4 Current defence policy, guidance and priorities remain extant

$30m

$42.5m

Est. CAPEX

1 Jul 2007

3.1.3 Existing LTDP projects are actioned

1 Jul 2009

3.1.5 No significant change in threat assessment

$250m 1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

$250m

3.1.6 Seasprite remains supportable

$92.5m

1 Jul 2012

3.1.7 Sufficient, capable and motivated personnel to maintain and operate equipment

$92.5m

$180.5m 1 Jul 2015

High Risk Medium Risk Low Risk

$88m 1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2021

1 Jul 2024

1 Jul 2007

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2009

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

1 Jul 2012

1 Jul 2015

END Decomm

Future Navy Personnel Competency and Structure Review

3.1.17 Conduct Future Naval Combat Force Capability study

3.1.49 Upgrade, Refurbish and integrate into ship, ANZAC Class CIWS $25m

1 Jul 2021

1 Jul 2018

3.1.9 Future NCF Known

3.1.5 Acquire Future Naval Combat Force

3.1.1 Modern, viable and credible Next Generation NCF (2025 to 2050)

Sustainable Naval Combat Capability (Warfare)

3.1.31 Improved Anti-Ship Missile Defence

3.1.53 Build case for Upgrade to ANZAC Class Self Defence Capability

3.1.15 Navy’s next combat system

3.1.29 Upgrade ANZAC Class Self Defence Capability $500m

3.1 Capability to perform many tasks in many different environments (VERSATILE) Ability to react quickly to changing operational demands (RESPONSIVE)

3.1.33 Viable and credible own and force defence against a variety of threats 3.1.35 Enhance 25mm and 0.5 calibre ammunition

Ability to deliver what is required, when it is required (EFFECTIVE)

3.1.13 Improved Anti-Submarine Warfare Capability

3.1.37 Enhance ANZAC Passive Surveillance System $1.5m

3.1.7 Replace NZDF Torpedos (CP Major)

3.1.39 Enhanced .50 Cal ammunition

Capability Build Initiatives

3.1.23 Upgrade Electro Optic FC Directors $1.2m

3.1.27 Enhance ANZAC Mini-Typhoon $1m $1.5m

3.1.41 Establish Force Protection (UWW)

3.1.11 Upgrade SH-2G(NZ) Seasprites (mid-life)

3.1.25 Improved protection against asymmetrical threats

3.1.3 Modern, viable and credible organic airborne ISR and weapon system

Measures Assumptions

Business Change Initiatives Business Change Outcomes

Final Business Outcomes

3.1.45 Improved effectiveness of small calibre weapons High Risk

3.2.2 P3K upgrades remain compatible with fleet

3.2.1 Reliable supply of ammunition

Est. CAPEX $6.2m

1 Jul 2007

Capability Build Outcomes

Customer Value Outcomes

3.1.43 Establish Force Protection (Surface) 3.1.47 Enhance 25mm and 0.5 calibre ammunition $0.35m $0.4m

3. STRATEGIC GOAL 3 – Credible and sustainable Maritime Military Capability across the spectrum of operations in New Zealand and overseas

Capability Build Initiatives (Aspirations)

3.1.53 Improved ability to defend against Fast Inshore Attack Craft (FIAC)

3.1.55 Install Mini Typhoon $6.2m

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2024 ANZAC Decomm

Medium Risk Low Risk

$14m

$18.7m 1 Jul 2009

$251m 1 Jul 2010

$255.5m

1 Jul 2011

1 Jul 2012

$3.25m 1 Jul 2015

1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2021

1 Jul 2024

Sustainable Naval Combat Capability (Communications, ISR, Situational Awareness, and Platform)

1 Jul 2007

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2009

1 Jul 2011

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2012

1 Jul 2015

1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2021

1 Jul 2024 ANZAC Decomm

3.2.33 Install ELINT Capability $3.5m

$1m

3.2.11 Implement GCCS-M v 4 $1m

$0.05m

3.2.13 Establish Next Generation Tactical Data Link $1m $1m $1m 3.2.15 Replace CESM $1m OPEX $2.5m OPEX $2.2m

3.2.17 Replace ANZAC ESM $2.2m

$1.8m

3.2.3 Improved ability to collect and share intelligence, and conduct surveillance and reconnaissance

3.2.5 Improve ANZAC ELINT – LPI 40Gb $0.75

3.2 Capability to perform many tasks in many different environments (VERSATILE)

3.2.31 Establish Small Boat Tracking and Data Transfer

3.2.1 Valued and credible contributor to Joint and Combined Operations

3.2.19 Generation and maintenance of Situational Awareness

Ability to react quickly to changing operational demands (RESPONSIVE) Ability to deliver what is required, when it is required (EFFECTIVE)

3. STRATEGIC GOAL 3 – Credible and sustainable Maritime Military Capability across the spectrum of operations in New Zealand and overseas

3.2.25 Upgrade Comms Control System 3.2.35 Install Wideband Satellite (C/Ku Band)

3.2.27 Improved Ability to Communicate 3.2.37 Upgrade to SWAN Mk II (MIPN Phase 4)

Capability Build Initiatives (Aspirations)

3.2.7 Upgrade UHF MILSATCOM (TEK, TEM) $0.15m $0.10m $0.1m

Capability Build Initiatives Capability Build Outcomes

3.2.39 Install sub net relay

3.2.9 Continuous operation and platform survivability in all environmental conditions

3.2.29 Upgrade ANZAC Class Platform Systems $30m $30m

Business Change Initiatives Business Change Outcomes Customer Value Outcomes

Measures

Assumptions

Final Business Outcomes

3.3.1 No significant changes to likely coalition partners ISR and C4I technology, interoperability and affordability

Est. CAPEX $3.5m

1 Jul 2007

1 Jul 2008

3.3.2 Ongoing access to Satellite communications (MILSATCOM)

$36.2m

3.3.3 IT bandwidth/ memory requirements remain sufficient (Moore’s Law)

$36.8m

1 Jul 2009

High Risk Medium Risk Low Risk

$3.75m

1 Jul 2010

$.10m

1 Jul 2011

$.10m

1 Jul 2012

1 Jul 2015

1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2021

1 Jul 2024

1 Jul 2007

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2009

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

1 Jul 2015

1 Jul 2012

1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2021

3.3.79 Review CONUSE for 3.3.21 Improved CANTERBURY planning, conduct

3.3.23 Install Amphibious C2 Software $0.15m 3.3.73 Install CANTERBURY Action Information System

Establish the Capability to Conduct Amphibious Operations

3.3.75 Establish doctrine for NZDF Amphibious Operations

1 Jul 2024 ANZAC Decomm

and support of amphibious operations

3.2.23 Install WECDIS Warship AIS & COP

3.3.11 Upgrade UHF MILSATCOM (CAN) $0.15m $0.10m $0.1m

3.3.69 Implement GCCS-M v 4

3.3 Capability to perform many tasks in many different environments (VERSATILE)

3.3.5 Ability to collect and share intelligence, and conduct surveillance and reconnaissance to support Joint Force Elements

3.3.25 Establish CANTERBURY CESM Capability $1.0m $2.5m 3.3.67 Establish Next Generation Tactical Data Link 3.2.31 Establish Small Boat Tracking and Data 3.3.13 Introduce Maritime UAVs (Medium) Transfer

3.3.83 Install Wideband Satellite (C/Ku Band)

3.3.65 Introduce Maritime Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) (Small)

3.3.1 Fully effective contributor to Joint Amphibious Operations and land forces

3.3.15 Establish CANTERBURY ESM System $3.5m $0.75m

3.3.63 Establish ISR (Interim ESM) Capability

3.3.63 Establish ISR (Interim CESM) Capability 3.3.27 Enhance CAN FIAC Protection $1m $3m 3.3.17 Implement CAN Torpedo Defence $0.75m $1.5m

3.3.59 Improve 25mm ‘Green water’ protection $0.10m

3.3.7 Protection against asymmetrical threats 3.3.31 Establish Force Protection (Surface)

3.3.29 Establish Force Protection (UWW)

3.3.3 Improved ability to defend against likely threats

Ability to react quickly to changing operational demands (RESPONSIVE) Ability to deliver what is required, when it is required (EFFECTIVE)

3. STRATEGIC GOAL 3 – Credible and sustainable Maritime Military Capability across the spectrum of operations in New Zealand and overseas

3.3.33 Enhance 25mm and 0.5 calibre ammunition

3.3.57 Fit CAN RHIB alcove doors $1.8m

3.3.35 Install RAS Winches $0.30m

3.3.19 Fit CAN to receive CIWS Block $0.75m

Capability Build Initiatives (Aspirations) Capability Build Initiatives

3.3.37 Upgrade CAN aviation spaces A/C $0.45m

Capability Build Outcomes

3.3.55 Enhance LCM System (Multiple Projects) $2.2m $0.3m 3.3.53 Acquire cargo workboat $0.15m 3.3.51 Upgrade CAN to embark ammo containers $0.20m 3.3.49 Enhance CAN petrol storage $0.10m 3.3.49 Conduct FOCFT $2.5m

3.3.39 Modify CAN embarked forces escape doors $0.35m

Business Change Initiatives 3.3.9 Acquire cargo workboat $0.15m

Business Change Outcomes Customer Value Outcomes

3.3.41 Improved ability to move and support land forces 3.3.43 Modify CAN side door $0.95m

Final Business Outcomes

3.3.47 Enhance CANTERBURY’s capability in ice operations

Metrics Assumptions

3.3.45 Enhanced Radar Tracking of Helos High Risk Medium Risk Low Risk

Est. CAPEX

1 Jul 2007

$4.5m

$7.05m 1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2009

$.1m $2.5m $12m 1 Jul 2011 1 Jul 2012 1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2015

1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2021

1 Jul 2024

1 Jul 2007

1 Jul 2009

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2012

1 Jul 2011

1 Jul 2015

1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2021

3.4.23 Install OPV Accommodation Sprinkler System $0.5m $0.5m

1 Jul 2024 ANZAC Decomm

3.2.31 Establish Small Boat Tracking and Data Transfer 3.4.25 Install OPV/IPV ISR Compartment

3.4.5 Establish OPV ESM System

3.4.27 Introduce OPV/IPV CESM Capability 3.4.29 Establish OPV/IPV ISR Capability (ESM) 3.4.31 Implement GCCS-M v 4 in OPVs 3.3.65 Introduce Maritime Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) (Small)

Sustainable Patrol Force

3.2.23 Install WECDIS Warship AIS & COP

3.4.3 Ability to collect and share intelligence, and conduct surveillance and reconnaissance 3. STRATEGIC GOAL 3 – Credible and sustainable Maritime Military Capability across the spectrum of operations in New Zealand 3.4.1 Improved and overseas ability to

3.3.13 Introduce Maritime UAVs (Medium)

3.4.35 Install OPV Action Information System

3.4.13 Improved conduct of operations

Operate in the full range of natural environments

3.4.37 Enhance OPV capability in ice operations 3.4.15 Enhance 25mm and 0.5 calibre ammunition 3.4.17 Upgrade OPV 25mm gun arcs $0.75m $0.75m 3.4.11 Establish OPV FIAC Protection $4.53m $1.6m

Capability Build Initiatives (Aspirations) 3.4.19 Establish Force Protection (UWW)

3.4.7 Protection against asymmetrical threats

Capability Build Initiatives Capability Build Outcomes

3.4.21 Establish Force Protection (Surface)

Business Change Initiatives

3.4.41 Enhanced Radar Tracking of Helos

3.4.9 Improved safety of naval aviation operations

Business Change Outcomes Customer Value Outcomes

Measures

Assumptions

Final Business Outcomes

3.5.1 Multi-Agency requirements for PPVs remain extant

3.5.2 PPVs able to fulfil the CONOPS without substantial modification

3.5.3 MoD procurement process is robust enough to deliver DIFOTIS

Est. CAPEX

1 Jul 2007

$1.25m

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2009

High Risk Medium Risk Low Risk

$5.78m

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

$1.6m

1 Jul 2012

1 Jul 2015

1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2021

1 Jul 2024

1 Jul 2007

1 Jul 2009

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2011

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2012

END Decomm

1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2015

1 Jul 2021

1 Jul 2024 ANZAC Decomm

3.5.17 Introduce M3M Chaingun for SH-2G $0.45m

3.5.5 Replace NZDF Torpedos (CP Major)

Sustainable Naval Aviation Capability

3.5.13 Establish Flight Deck Procedural Trainer $0.6m

See also SG3 Amphib, Support and NPF Streams 3.4.41 Enhanced Radar Tracking of Helos $0.45m $0.6m

3.5.11 Improved collective training and evaluation of capability

3.5 Capability to perform many tasks in many different environments (VERSATILE)

3.5.15 Improved safety in conduct of naval aviation operations

3.3.65 Introduce Maritime UAVs (Small) $0.2m $1m

3.5.7 Replace SH-2G(NZ) Seasprites (mid-life)

3.5.9 Ability to collect and share intelligence, & conduct surveillance and reconnaissance to support Own and other Force Elements

$2m

3.5.1 Improved Anti-Submarine Warfare Capability

3.5.3 Modern, viable and credible organic airborne ISR and weapon system

3. STRATEGIC GOAL 3 – Credible and sustainable Ability to react Maritime Military Capability quickly to changing across the spectrum of operational demands operations (RESPONSIVE) in New Zealand and overseas Ability to deliver what is required, when it is required (EFFECTIVE)

Capability Build Initiatives (Aspirations)

3.3.13 Introduce Maritime UAVs (Medium) $2m $2m $2.3m

Capability Build Initiatives Capability Build Outcomes Business Change Initiatives Business Change Outcomes Customer Value Outcomes

Measures

Assumptions

Final Business Outcomes 3.6.1 NZDF Torpedo replacement interoperable with Seasprite and P3K2

Est. CAPEX

1 Jul 2007

High Risk Medium Risk Low Risk

$2.05m

$.65m

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2009

1 Jul 2010

$4.6m

1 Jul 2011

$2m

1 Jul 2012

$2.3m

1 Jul 2015

1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2021

1 Jul 2024

1 Jul 2007

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2009

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

1 Jul 2012

END Decomm

1 Jul 2015

1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2021

1 Jul 2024 ANZAC Decomm

Sustainable Naval Support Force (Replenishment) Capability

Personnel Competency and Structure Planning

3.6.13 Conduct Future Naval Replenishment and Support Capability study

3.6.17 Convert END to double hull $1.5m (OPEX & CAPEX)

3.6.7 Future Afloat support 3.6.5 Acquire Future Naval Replenishment and Support Force $250m (estimated for 2013 dollars) capability known

3.6.11 Compliance with international regulations

3.6.1 Modern, viable and credible Next Generation NSF (2014 to 2044)

3.6 Capability to perform many tasks in many different environments (VERSATILE)

3.1.41 Establish Force Protection (UWW)

3.6.3 Protection against asymmetrical threats

Ability to react quickly to changing operational demands (RESPONSIVE)

3.1.43 Establish Force Protection (Surface)

3. STRATEGIC GOAL 3 – Credible and sustainable Maritime Military Capability across the spectrum of operations in New Zealand and overseas

Ability to deliver what is required, when it is required (EFFECTIVE)

3.6.15 Install GCCS 4 in END 3.2.31 Establish Small Boat Tracking and Data Transfer

Capability Build Initiatives (Aspirations)

3.6.9 Ability to collect and share intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance information

Capability Build Initiatives Capability Build Outcomes Business Change Initiatives Business Change Outcomes Customer Value Outcomes

Measures

Assumptions

Final Business Outcomes

3.7.1 Double hull for END will remain compliant until vessel is replaced

Est. CAPEX

1 Jul 2007

High Risk

3.7.2 Current refuelling practices remain compliant

Medium Risk Low Risk

$1.5m

1 Jul 2008

$83.33m

1 Jul 2009

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

$83.33m

1 Jul 2012

$83.33m

1 Jul 2015

1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2021

1 Jul 2024

1 Jul 2007

1 Jul 2009

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2011

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2012 Personnel Competency and Structure Planning

1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2015 MAN Decomm

1 Jul 2021

1 Jul 2024 ANZAC Decomm

3.7.18 Implement Littoral Warfare Support Capability (LWSC) Strategy

3.7.23 LWS becomes core RNZN capability

Sustainable Littoral Warfare Support (MCM, Diving and Hydrographic) Capability

3.7.41 Implement LWS CONOPS

3.7.7 Future Ad For diving/MCM/ Hydro MCM support capability known

3.7.17 Conduct Future LWS Diving/MCM/ Hydrographic Afloat Support Capability study

3.7.3 Acquire Future LWS - Diving/MCM/Hydrographic Afloat Capability $120m

3.3.13 Introduce Maritime UAVs (Medium)

3.7.5 Update Route Surveys $2.5m

3.3.65 Introduce Maritime Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) (Small)

3.2.23 Install WECDIS Warship AIS & COP

3.7.15 Introduce minesweeping USV $3.3m $1.5m 3.7.19 Introduce Capability to neutralise mines $2.2m $1.5m $0.50m 3.7.25 Introduce Diver MCM and REA Search Equipment 3.7.11 Improved ability to detect and eliminate mine and $0.50m $0.50m underwater IED threats 3.7.27 Introduce MCM C2 Software $0.135m $0.050m 3.7.29 Develop REMUS (Spiral Development) $0.40m $0.40m $0.50m 3.7.31 Establish Deployable Maritime IEDD capability $0.50m $0.50m

3.7.1 Modern, viable and credible Next Generation LWS Diving, Hydrographic and MCM Force (2015 to 2045)

3. STRATEGIC GOAL 3 – Credible and sustainable Maritime Military Capability across the spectrum of operations in New Zealand and overseas

3.7.9 Introduce mid size MCM and REA UUV $2.2m $4m

3.7.33 Provide Advance Forces Boats $0.95m

3.7.35 Ability to prepare and support Advance Forces 3.7.37 Introduce Advance Force Sensors and Systems $0.35m $0.35m $0.20m

3.7.39 Introduce MAN dynamic positioning, track keeping and ethernet bus $0.40m $1.4m

3.7.13 Improved conduct of diving operations

Capability Build Initiatives (Aspirations) Capability Build Initiatives

3.7.21 Introduce Deployable Surface Demand Diving Capability $0.35m $0.25m

Capability Build Outcomes Business Change Initiatives Business Change Outcomes

3.1.41 Establish Force Protection (UWW)

3.2.31 Establish Small Boat Tracking and Data Transfer

Protection against asymmetrical threats

Customer Value Outcomes

Measures

Assumptions

3.1.43 Establish Force Protection (Surface)

3.8.1 Comms between Navy and Army are interoperable for amphibious ops

3.8.2 Environmental skill set retained for H forces

1 Jul 2008

High Risk Medium Risk Low Risk

$3.24m

Est. CAPEX

1 Jul 2007

Final Business Outcomes

$5.75m

1 Jul 2009

$5.75m

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

$4.2m

$36.5m

1 Jul 2012

$30m

$30m

1 Jul 2015

$30m

1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2021

1 Jul 2024

1 Jul 2007

1 Jul 2009

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

3.8.25 Establish Computerised Stability Modelling Capability $0.3m $0.3m 3.8.37 Review and improve structure, processes, competencies and resources of Capability Division [ACN (C)] 3.8.41 Develop and test a robust methodology for capability investment prioritisation and selection [DNx/ DNCR]

Introduction and exploitation of MMC

3.8.43 Develop a Maritime Strategy/Future Maritime Operating Concept-type guiding document [CN]

3.8.27 Improved capability planning and investment

3.8.23 Measurement and management of capability process performance

3.8.9 Optimisation of capability investment

3.8.13 Strong relationships of trust with key stakeholders

$0.2m

3.8.33 Provide MAVERICK targets $.1m

3.8.3 Agility in responding to rapidly changing technologies, threats, or immediate operational requirements

3.8.5 Enhance MCM and Diver Evaluation Capability $1.5m

3.8 Excellence in managing the introduction, maintenance, support and exploitation of MMC

3.8.7 Improved Self Defence trg and eval

3. STRATEGIC GOAL 3 – Credible and sustainable Maritime Military Capability across the spectrum of operations in New Zealand and overseas

3.8.1 Ability to measure and prove the military effect of new MMC immediately after introduction

3.8.35 Improved collective training and evaluation of capability

Capability Build Initiatives (Aspirations)

3.8.19 Upgrade ranging analysis capability $0.8m

Capability Build Initiatives Capability Build Outcomes Business Change Initiatives

3.8.21 Improved evaluation of acoustic signatures

Metrics

Assumptions

3.8.45 Review of Semanship Activities [CDR MOET]

3.9.1 ICP funding will remain at current levels to enable Capability Division international engagements

3.9.2 Operating funds remain adequate to sustain fleet operations

Est. CAPEX

1 Jul 2007

3.9.3 NZDF prioritisation and selection criteria enables achievement of MMC investment priorities

1 Jul 2009

Customer Value Outcomes Final Business Outcomes

3.8.49 Improved safety during ship operations

3.9.4 Capability roadmaps can be enabled through LTDP revision and adequate levels of CP Minor funding

$1.75m

$0.3m 1 Jul 2008

Business Change Outcomes

3.8.15 Upgrade noise range $5m 3.8.47 Implementation of seamanship review findings [Fleet XO]

$1.85m

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2024

1 Jul 2021

ANZAC Decomm

3.8.17 Improved Diving/EOD/IEDD trg and eval

3.8.31 Provide FIAC targets $0.3m

$0.75m

1 Jul 2018

3.8.11 Ability to rapidly assess stability implications of capability proposals

3.8.29 Develop and implement a programme of strengthened industry relationships [ACN (C)]

3.8.39 Operationalise DTA Forward Range $0.3m $0.3m

1 Jul 2015

1 Jul 2012

High Risk Medium Risk Low Risk

$5.2m

1 Jul 2011

1 Jul 2012

$1.5m 1 Jul 2015

1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2021

1 Jul 2024

1 Jul 2007

1 Jul 2009

1 Jul 2008

3.9.33 Replace Naval Base 60Hz generation and reticulation $6.12m $6m

1 Jul 2015

1 Jul 2012

1 Jul 2011

1 Jul 2010

ANZAC Decomm

Introduction, maintenance, and support of MMC

3.9.1 Safe and compliant explosives storage and handling

3.9.17 Clear programme of investment optimised for long term sustainability 3.9.15 Establish Remote Duty Watch System $3m

3.9.29 Development of an Alliance value Model [CFS]

1 Jul 2024

1 Jul 2021

3.9.9 Reduced reliance on own-ship power

3.9.7 Improved logistics and shore support 3.9.11 Storage of 3.9.35 Replace Naval Fuel and Aviation Fuel Installations strategic and $9.73m $10.26m operational fuel 3.9.37 Acquire and install ANZAC 3.9.13 Upgrade/Replace RNZAD Explosive Store Houses 3.9.21 Safe NSS Missile Handling and Support $0.5m $4m $4.3m $2.2m movement of capability missiles $?m

3.9.27 Establish a baseline Industrial Precinct Estate Plan [CFS]

1 Jul 2018

3.9.5 Reduced onboard workload

3.9 Optimised platform and system availability against fiscal, personnel and other constraints

See also SG1

3.9.3 Establish Remote Maintenance Managment System $3m

3.9.19 Value Model Established

3. STRATEGIC GOAL 3 – Credible and sustainable Maritime Military Capability across the spectrum of operations in New Zealand and overseas

Capability Build Initiatives (Aspirations) Capability Build Initiatives

3.9.31 Review Fleet Support longterm options [CFS]

3.9.23 Transition to new model [CFS]

Capability Build Outcomes Business Change Initiatives

Metrics

Assumptions

3.9.25 Most effective and efficient long-term model for supporting the fleet identified

Customer Value Outcomes Final Business Outcomes

3.10.2 No significant changes to international or national regulations

3.10.1 Industrial base remains available to support development

Est. CAPEX $15.85m

1 Jul 2007

Business Change Outcomes

1 Jul 2008

High Risk Medium Risk Low Risk

$16.26m 1 Jul 2009

$3.5m

$7m 1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

$4.3m 1 Jul 2012

$2.2m 1 Jul 2015

1 Jul 2018

1 Jul 2021

1 Jul 2024

Strategic Goal 4 – Excellent performance measurement, management and continuous improvement approaches by 2011 1 Jul 2009 External Evaluation

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2007

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

4.2.21 Establish an Nx and Business Excellence Principles internal marketing and promotion programme [DNx] 4.2.5 CPE core values and concepts understood and valued in a Naval context

4.2 CPE core values and concepts applied across the Navy

4.2.25 Write NZBR6 (Navy Staff Manual) [DNx]

Reinvigorate Naval Excellence

4.2.23 Develop case studies of Navy successes [DNx]

4.2.4 Develop an integrated and systematic approach to Annual and Financial Planning [DNx/FC(N)]

4.2.17 New business concepts and practices stimulated, debated and disseminated 4.2.3 Successful Navy business practices identified and shared 4.2.19 Create a Navy business excellence community of practice and programme [DNx]

4.2.9 Formalise relationships with group improvement officers (GIO’s) [DNx]

4.2.1 Improved capacity and competence of our people to manage

4. STRATEGIC GOAL 4 Excellent performance measurement, management and continuous improvement approaches by 2011

4.2.15 Training that is tailored and targeted

4.2.13 Implement programme of JO and SR exposure to Navy corporate practices [DNx]

Capability Build Initiatives 4.2.7 A defined training and development framework integrated with LDG

Capability Build Outcomes Business Change Initiatives Business Change Outcomes

4.2.35 Review, redesign and deploy an Nx principles targeted training programme aligned to competency framework [DNx]

Customer Value Outcomes 4.2.11 Create a business excellence training and development framework [DNx]

OPTEMPO and manning sufficient for improvements to be implemented

Measures

Assumptions

Final Business Outcomes

1 Jul 2007

High Risk Medium Risk Low Risk

CPE Total Score

700

Average 7 Point Fix Score Increases (over baseline)

B/L 55%

Nx Perception Survey

1 Jul 2008

15%

5% >65% Awareness of Services

1 Jul 2009

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

Strategic Goal 4 – Excellent performance measurement, management and continuous improvement approaches by 2011 1 Jul 2009 External Evaluation

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2007

4.3.43 Design 7 point fix [linked with MCC Admin Inspection] [DNx]

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

Implement a plan of 7 point fixes [DNx]

4.3.41 Capability to monitor progress of ADLI across Navy functional areas and units

4.3.29 Regular monitoring of progress

Enhance Measurement, Analysis and Assessment Capabilities

4.3.31 Unit Managers provided with accurate feedback on the ADLI of business processes

4.3.21 Develop new benchmarking relationships and standardised KPIs with benchmarking partners [DNx] 4.3.27 Benchmarking networking established with external agencies and organisations

4.3.13 All scorecard measures with comparators (2011) 4.3.39 Facilitate unit development and implementation of unit projections [DNx]

4.3.22 Develop agreed outputs from RNZNVR [CNR]

4.3.17 All scorecard measures with projections 4.3.9 All functional area scorecards developed and deployed

4.3.16 Develop ROI model for RNZNVR [CNR]

4.3.3 Improved ability to compare and project performance

4.3.47 Fully develop and deploy full Navy suite of scorecards

4.3 Improved ability to manage by fact 4.3.23 Develop CFS bottom line measures and ROI [CFS]

4.3.15 Improved ability to measure effectiveness of Personnel and Training, Capability and Fleet Support

4.3.33 Develop Training ROI [DNSPP] 4.3.7 Ability to measure Navy bottom line value across the spectrum of operations 4.3.25 Engage specialist to investigate and develop model of Navy bottom line value [DNx] 4.3.45 Develop and implement measures of output and quality for Multi-Agency Operations and Tasks [IG(N)]

Assumptions

Links from

Measures

4.3.1 All scorecard measures with benchmarks (2011)

Other Government Agencies can provide or assist in development of metrics

CIS resources sufficient to support establishment of BI capability

FFNEC

Other Navies and potential benchmarking partners committed to standard metrics

High Risk Medium Risk Low Risk

CPE Cat 4.1 (Measurement and Analysis) Scores

1 Jul 2007

4. STRATEGIC GOAL 4 Excellent performance measurement, management and continuous improvement approaches by 2011

75%

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2009

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

Strategic Goal 4 – Excellent performance measurement, management and continuous improvement approaches by 2011 1 Jul 2007

1 Jul 2009 External Evaluation

1 Jul 2008

4.4.31 Develop and Deploy N-Gates [DNx]

4.4.19 N- Gates deployed

4.4.15 Improved ability to prioritise and select investments 4.4 Doing the right things

4.4.29 Establish Navy Portfolio Support Office (BA1 and PM) [DNx]

Establish Governance and Support for Investment in Change

1 Jul 2011

e’ lin res m to asu ot ‘B me m OI fro R ks and Lin ue l va

4.4.21 Establish a State Sector Benefits Management Community of Practice [DNx]

1 Jul 2010

4. STRATEGIC GOAL 4 Excellent performance measurement, management and continuous improvement approaches by 2011

4.4.13 Improved resourcing of change initiatives

4.4.25 Establish an interim Navy Programme and Project Management Solution [DNx] 4.4.27 Establish a formal programme of project management and benefits management training [DNx]

4.4 Doing things well

4.4.5 Improved implementation of programmes and projects

4.4.17 Establish the PSO Navy SPM (Specialist Project Manager) [DNx] 4.4.1 Improved capacity and competence of our people to manage 4.4.9 Identifiable, meaningful improvement and value creation through innovation

4.4.23 Establish Innovation framework [DNx]

4.4.11 Develop and deploy a risk management training programme [DNx]

Capability Build Initiatives Capability Build Outcomes Business Change Initiatives Business Change Outcomes

4.4.3 Improved management of risks

Customer Value Outcomes

Measures

Assumptions

4.4.7 Review and communicate risk appetite and improve tools and associated reporting processes [DNx]

HQ NZDF Supports Navy approach and model

Highly competent staff recruited into PSO

Mean Project Management Maturity Level (scale 0-5) Mean sample Project Health Scores (scale 0-6)

Information Systems established to support N-Gates

Full time project managers are not required to ensure benefits are realised

Sufficient financial resources are available to achieve a worthwhile minimum of initiatives

Personnel are motivated to innovate and contribute improvements

High Risk Medium Risk Low Risk

2.0

2.5

3.0

3.5

3.0

3.5

4.0

5.0 75%

CPE Cat 2.2 (Strat Deploy) Scores

1 Jul 2007

NLB Business Case Rework Rejection Rate

Final Business Outcomes

10%

5%

1 Jul 2008

3%

1%

1 Jul 2009

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

Strategic Goal 4 – Excellent performance measurement, management and continuous improvement approaches by 2011 Phase II - June 2009

Ashore Support

4.1.53 Create process enhancements using existing capabilities

Phase III - December 2009

4.1.43 Build process automation utilising new IMX environment 4.1.27 Achieve maximum automation of processes via integration of IT systems 4.1.1 Personnel are less stressed and 4.1.9 NPF havefrustrated

4.1.33 Optimised and standardised admin & reporting processes across whole NPF 4.1.45 Effort to conduct admin and reporting minimised 4.1.29 Streamline NAVPAC and REGISTRY remote admin utilising interim process enhancements

Post Programme Closure (2010)

Phase IV - June 2010

4.1.29 Streamline NAVPAC and REGISTRY remote admin utilising automated processes

4.1.29 Streamline NAVPAC and REGISTRY remote admin utilising integrated processes

4.1.35 Resource numbers to conduct admin and reporting minimised 4.1.13 Implement centralised (Engineering) remote monitoring & support

4.1.39 Investigate centralised (Engineering) remote monitoring & support

increased focus on efficiently conducting operational processes

4.1.3 NPF operate effectively within their Scheme of Complement

4.1 Less attrition

4.1 NPF outputs delivered at optimal cost

4.1.51 Optimised support ashore augmenting the ability of the NPF to operate effectively 4.1.57 Build local IMX environment (ship specific) 4.1.59 Build record keeping environment 4.1.61 Build collaboration environment 4.1.47 Build publication environment

IMX

4.1.11 Time to competence decreased for 4.1.5 NPF have 4.1.31 Quality operational information available on demand to NPF increased ability personnel afloat to conduct 4.1.25 Increased situational awareness operational processes 4.1.23 More informed decision making (mgt by fact) effectively 4.1.21 Fewer operational mistakes

Reporting

4.1.63 Rationalise reporting requirements and centralise publication

4.1.19 Create on-demand & positioned report capability 4.1.49 Improved transparency in decision making & activity afloat 4.1.17 Quality management reports available on demand

Assumptions

Measures

Establish Network Enabled Capability Focused on the Fleet

Process Streamlining

Phase I June 2008

Skilled technical and business resource will be available for the duration

Other programmes will deliver fit for purpose capabilities in a timely manner

Reduction in Admin and Reporting over baseline

10 %

15 %

NAVEST growth avoided

1 LWTR

5 LWTRs

NAVEST reduction

1 LWTR & 1 AWTR

No obstructions to the redesign of NPF processes

No obstructions to the design of enhanced support

The NPF adopt new ways of working

15 %

4.1 Less wear and tear on equipment

4.1.41 Build data warehouse & user defined report capability 4.1.7 Fewer Operational Errors 4.1.15 Improved risk management

Stakeholder change agenda remains consistent

The NPF CONUSE is correct

Experience level of GL(E) reduced per OPV

The planned SoC represents an optimum SoC for the NPF

4. STRATEGIC GOAL 4 Excellent performance measurement, management and continuous improvement approaches by 2011

4.1 Less unnecessary expenditure putting things right

NZDF strategic focus remains consistent

High Risk Medium Risk Low Risk

Strategic Goal 5 – The majority of New Zealanders understanding the benefits we bring to the Nation through the exploitation of Maritime Military Capability by 2011 1 Jul 2007

1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2009

5.1.19 Establish an RNO/HNO activity, suggestion and community perception reporting scheme [DNRM]

5.1.13 HNO Qualitative assessment of Navy’s public reputation

5.2.21 Define NRM / Navy Museum roles, responsibilities, mutual support, processes and shared outcomes [DNRM]

5.2.15 Develop a business case for a programme of internet sites upgrades [PDNIS]

5.2.3 Synergies exploited between Recruiting, Museum, DPRU and NRM

k to

5.2.5 Implement internet sites technology upgrades [PDNIS]

5.3.39 Survey [DNRM]

5.3.43 Review and improve public perception metrics, identify comparators and improve perception surveys [DNRM]

SG 1

5.2.7 Coordinated and mutuallysupportive processes and functions

5.2.9 Upgrades planned and funded

5.2.1 Enhanced web prescence

5.3.9 Survey [DNRM]

5.3.11 Survey [DNRM]

Assumptions Measures

1 Jul 2007

5.3.3 Survey [DNRM]

5.3.1 Survey [DNRM]

5.1 Understanding and support amongst New Zealanders for the entire spectrum of operations 5.3.31 Implement revised NRM structure and resourcing [DNRM]

5.3.27 A systematic RM approach and implementation of a coordinated programme of activities and initiatives

5.3.29 Review and improve internal corporate communications (Annual Reports, Key Reputation Messages, etc) [DNRM]

Perceived as small but effective Perceived as professional and business-like Perceived as doing a good job for NZ Perceived as making a difference to NZ Knowledge and support of spectrum of operations

5.3.5 Survey [DNRM]

Qualitative and quantitative assessment of Navy’s reputation and public understanding of the benefits of MMC 5.3.19 Develop a medium-term reputation management plan [DNRM] 5.3.35 Implement short-term reputation management plan [DNRM] 5.3.13 Implement medium-term reputation management plan [DNRM]

5.3.33 Identify appropriate NRM structure and resources [DNRM]

DPRU recognises the specific needs of the Navy

5.3.7 Survey [DNRM]

5.3.37 Improved ability to manage by fact

5.3.41 Develop a short-term reputation management plan [DNRM]

NZDF Branding confuse public perception of Navy

5.1.3 Improved means of engagement inside the community

and boundaries

5.2.19 Define NRM / Navy Recruiting roles, responsibilities, processes and shared outcomes [DNRM]

Lin k “C to / rea fro m te eff SG ec tiv 1 Re e u cr se uitm of on ent S lin 5.2.25 e s trate pa gy Review ce 5.2.23 ” Navy OFIs internet known sites [PDNIS]

5.1.1 Improved effectiveness of RNOs/ HNOs

5.1.9 Develop an 5.1.7 HNO performance Performance assessment system of HNOs [DNRM] known

5.1.11 Establish an RNZN Alumni reputation management programme of key messages/ Navy sitreps, etc [DNRM] l rna ” n te e i ti o n s v pro ica “Im mun m m o o c r te kf 5.2.11 Clarity Lin pora r co around roles

5.2.17 Review and establish NRM / DPRU roles, agreements and SoPs [DNRM]

5.2.13 Establish agreed RM, PR and Navy Marketing Governance structure and processes [DNRM]

5.1.5 Establish an RNO/HNO education and development programme [DNRM]

5.1.15 Identify best practice [DNRM]

1 Jul 2012

1 Jul 2011

Li n

Build and Enhance Community Networks

5.1.17 Increased visibility of RNO/ HNO activity and practices

Develop and Enhance Reputation-building Initiatives and Capabilities

Establish Reputation Management Governance

All PROTECTOR ships delivered and crewed

1 Jul 2008

PROTECTOR is seen as a success

NRM has the right number of the right people

5.3.21 A coordinated and planned approach to corporate communications

RNOs/HNOs have sufficient time to be trained and to deliver on the plan

5.1 Recognition amongst New Zealanders that the Navy is an efficient and effective organisation 5.3.15 Every sailor and civilian equipped and competent to deliver a consistent message

5.3.23 Establish an RM training framework and programme for all RNZN personnel [DNRM]

RNOs / HNOs will recognise the benefits of having performance assessed

4 me n SG ess m s fro As nk E Li CP e ig dr al B “

5.3.17 Implement reputation management training [DNRM]

5. STRATEGIC GOAL 5 The majority of New Zealanders understanding the benefits we bring to the Nation through the exploitation of MMC by 2011

” ts

5.3.25 Conduct NRM Health Check [DNx]

Alumni want to be involved in reputation management

High Risk Medium Risk Low Risk

65%

67%

69%

72%

75%

80%

85%

90%

70%

72%

74%

78%

82%

86%

90%

90%

52%

56%

60%

65%

75%

80%

85%

90%

73%

74%

78%

82%

84%

86%

88%

90%

TBD

TBD

TBD

TBD

TBD

TBD

TBD

1 Jul 2008

1 Jul 2009

TBD 1 Jul 2010

1 Jul 2011

1 Jul 2012

To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World

Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Annex B – NZDF Strategy Map

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

B1

To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World

Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

B2

To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World

Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Annex C – Navy Strategic Management Process Steps

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

C1

To be the Best Small-Nation Navy in the World

Kia mau mana motuhake e te taua moana o te ao

Strategic Plan 2008 – 2025

C2