Teaching with Digital Images - ISTE

Distribution and copying of this excerpt is allowed for educational purposes and use with full attribution to ... In recent years, technology has been the catalyst for.
1MB Sizes 7 Downloads 149 Views
Excerpted from

Teaching with Digital Images Acquire • Analyze • Create • Communicate Glen L. Bull and Lynn Bell, Editors

Digital cameras are ubiquitous, their prices are falling, and students love them. Now’s the time to bring digital cameras into your classroom, and ISTE’s new book shows you how. Experienced practitioners Glen Bull and Lynn Bell bring together all the technical and logistical strategies you’ll need, and subject area experts contribute ideas and lessons for meeting curricular goals. Math experts, for example, tackle proportional reasoning, irregular figures, and creating context for story problems. Experts in teaching science focus on using digital cameras to help students understand events and processes that are otherwise too small, too fast, or too slow to visualize. The following sample chapter from the coordinator of teacher programs at the National Gallery of Art explores the fascinating—and beautiful!—links between art, storytelling, and visual literary. Integrate digital images into your curriculum today!

Copyright 2005, ISTE ® (International Society for Technology in Education), Teaching with Digital Images: Acquire, Analyze, Create, Communicate, Glen L. Bull and Lynn Bell, editors. 1.800.336.5191 or 1.541.302.3777 (Int’l), [email protected], www.iste.org. All rights reserved. Distribution and copying of this excerpt is allowed for educational purposes and use with full attribution to ISTE.

C H A P T E R

4 Elizabeth Langran

digital images and copyright IT’S EASY to imagine the following scenarios: a teacher constructs a Web page for a social studies class using historical images downloaded from the National Archives Web site. Meanwhile, a student grabs an image from Google, uses Adobe Photoshop to manipulate it, drops it into an iMovie video clip, adds an MP3 of a popular song as a soundtrack, and creates a digital story. You may not even have to imagine these things—something similar may already be happening on a regular basis in your school. In

this age of peer-to-peer file swapping and cut and paste from the Web, anything goes, right? Well, perhaps not. These “original” works are being constructed using sounds and images created by other artists.

T E A C H I N G W I T H DIG I T A L I M A G E S

43 Copyright © 2005, ISTE ® (International Society for Technology in Education), Teaching with Digital Images: Acquire, Analyze, Create, Communicate, Glen L. Bull and Lynn Bell, editors. 1.800.336.5191 or 1.541.302.3777 (Int’l), [email protected], www.iste.org. All rights reserved. Distribution and copying of this excerpt is allowed for educational purposes and use with full attribution to ISTE.

Chapter 4



Digital Images and Copyright

The idea of original “authorship” is becoming increasingly attenuated and confusing. While free and ubiquitous programs such as Movie Maker and iMovie make it easy for students to become active creators of digital media (not just passive observers), the potential for misuse of copyrighted material represents a tremendous challenge for schools and teachers. Learning to navigate the murky and ever-changing current of copyright law has never been more difficult. A work need not have a copyright symbol anywhere on it to be protected by copyright law. Any work created in any tangible form of expression—printed text, a photo or film, a piece of music, a Web page—is automatically copyrighted, and remains protected for many years after the creator’s death. New technologies, of course, have created new gray areas and unforeseen circumstances that will require ongoing legal interpretation. Copyright law is not a fixed entity; instead, it is malleable and constantly changing in response to the influence of interested parties. In recent years, technology has been the catalyst for major revisions of copyright law, as legislators try to find a balance between corporate interests and consumer rights. It is understandable that many educat