The Clarion, Vol. 81, Issue #10 - Oct. 30, 2015 - Brevard College

Oct 30, 2015 - “EV charging stations and divestment at Brevard College will not change .... to help the “Sheep Dog” community, a com- ..... Southern Indiana.
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The

Scarion

Volume 81, Issue 10 Web Edition

www.brevard.edu/clarion

SCARING BREVARD COLLEGE SINCE 1935

Photo courtesy of Brevard College

“EV charging stations and divestment at Brevard College will not change the world by themselves, but they do serve to lead the world toward a future in which all of the inhabitants of our planet can thrive in a cleaner, healthier planet,” BC Professor of Geology Jim Reynolds said. “At Brevard College, we are proud to train the leaders of tomorrow.” Reynolds is pictured here (L-R) with Bob Harris - Black Bear Solar Institute, SGA President Steve Olson, Brevard resident and EV owner Jim Hardy, and VP of Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty Scott Sheffield conduct official ribbon-cutting.

BC cuts ribbon for new electric car charging stations on campus Contributor

On Oct. 26, BC unveiled electric car charging stations on campus for the first time. Community members, students, and faculty gathered to see history in the making. BC is the first college or university in the U.S. to offer combined Tesla chargers and standard electric chargers for free public-access. BC will also have more Tesla high power chargers than any other campus in the U.S., as one has been installed next to Bill’s Boiler House, and the other is under construction at Sims Art Building. Additionally, Brevard College is the first organization in Transylvania County to secure chargers. Electric cars have been proven to reduce smog-forming pollutants, and use half as much

fossil fuel even when being supplied by fossilfuel burning plants. Electric vehicles produce fewer greenhouse gases, and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by as much as 22% even when being powered by coal-burning power plants. BC was able to secure the charging stations through the tireless effort of President David Joyce, Dr. Jim Reynolds, Jim Hardy, Deborah Hall, Henry Haywood, and Bob Harris of Black Bear Solar Institute. The SGA was another organization that pushed for the addition of these electric car chargers on our campus, and hosted the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the unveiling of the electric chargers. This is following last year’s divestment from fossil fuels movement, which was headed by Reynolds and Emily Crowley. BC has once again taken a step towards a greener future.

October 30, 2015

Documentary  reveals international education deficits By Gabby Smith

By Steve Olson

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Opinion Editor On Tuesday, Oct. 27, IWIL (Institute for Women in Leadership) hosted a screening of “Girl Rising,” a CNN Films documentary directed by Richard Robbins. The film details how nine girls of varying ages, from regions around the globe, try to overcome obstacles to achieve education. It emphasizes why learning is so important to them. Each girl was partnered with an author from their own country who wrote down their story. Through the stories of these nine girls, the documentary focuses on how educating a girl in the third world has positive results. Contrary to these results, the girls were prevented from attending school due to poverty, cultural standards, and gender-based violence. Haitian native Wadley was prevented from going to primary school. She couldn’t afford to pay for her schooling following the tragic earthquake in Haiti. Amina, from Afghanistan, was unable to go to school due to the social status of women in her country. Suma was unable to attend school because she was sold into slavery by her parents at six years old. Educating girls improves their community and helps protect them from sexual and gender based violence. Education can grow an economy by about 5.5 million dollars, yet 62 million girls, like Wadley, Amina, and Suma, cannot attend school. As a developed country, we should invest in girls’ education. This would mean that girls who would usually be denied even the most basic rights at times, would have a chance to