THE OPEN BOOK - Wikimedia Commons

Jul 23, 1997 - strangely-arranged events with niche themes and a confusing set of organisers ..... 3. Resources. As much as we would like to think it is, open data is not free ...... http://www.kmworld.com/Articles/Column/The-Future-of-the-Future/The-Future-of- ..... you intend to use (e.g. Wordpress, Git and LaTeX, YouTube,.
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Reaktio #3

THE OPEN BOOK is a publication on open knowledge edited by Kaitlyn Braybrooke and Jussi Nissilä with Timo Vuorikivi.

Reaktio is a publication series launched in December 2011 to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of The Finnish Institute in London. The books in this series are reactions to contemporary critical issues, they pose questions and offer commentary. These books contain seeds for debate and provoke action; they are books to think with and books to act on. At the back of the book we have left space for you to make your own notes. What do you think? —Raija Koli, Series Editor

To those who attended the world’s first Open Knowledge Festival in Helsinki, Finland and who continue to travel across continents to promote open knowledge and transparency worldwide. You are a continued inspiration.

Reaktio #3

THE OPEN BOOK

Colophon Edited by Kaitlyn Braybrooke and Jussi Nissilä with Timo Vuorikivi Graphic design by Åh, www.ah-studio.com Special thanks to the authors of the articles, those who submitted events to the timeline, and everybody who knowingly or unknowingly contributed to the making of this book. Published by The Finnish Institute in London 35–36 Eagle Street, London WC1R 4AQ www.finnish-institute.org.uk   The Open Book can be freely copied, reused and redistributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license. Its contributors retain individual copyright over their respective contributions, and have kindly agreed to release them under the terms of this license.   Printed by GB Litho, London 2013 Edition of 500 ISBN: 978-0-9570776-3-8

Contents Part One—Evolution

Introduction by Kaitlyn Braybrooke and Jussi Nissilä The Evolution of Open Knowledge

2 7

Part Two—A to Z Avoin GLAM

A

Open Cultural Data by Joris Pekel

10

By the People

B

Transforming Western Societies by Joonas Pekkanen

15

Collective Intelligence

C

Crowdsourcing by Tanja Aitamurto

18

Data Volunteers

D

Peer Collected Open Data by Kari A Hintikka

21

Educating Better

E

School of Open by Jane Park

27

Free as in Speech

Software, Power and Control by Karsten Gerloff

F

29

On Giants’ Shoulders

G

What’s Next for Open Hardware and Design? by Peter Troxler

32

Hands-on

H

Hacker Ethic, Openness and Sustainability by Jorge Luis Zapico

40

International Cooperation

I

Exploring Open Development collaboratively authored piece

45

DIY Journalism

Data Journalism by Simon Rogers

J

52

Knowledge Visualisation

K

A Semi-Surprise Wedding For Public Insight by Miska Knapek

54

Living Smart

L

Open Cities by Haidee Bell and Hanna Niemi-Hugaerts

59

Making Things

M

Open Sourcing Material by Catarina Mota

67

New Opportunities

N

The Power of Linked Open Data by Denise Recheis and Thomas Thurner

72

Organisations and Power

Ambivalence of Openness by Mayo Fuster Morell

O

76

Peer-produced Learning

P

Peeragogy in Action by Joseph Corneli, Charles Danoff, Anna Keune and Amanda Lyons

80

Questioning Status Quo

Q

The Transforming Face of Education by Tarmo Toikkanen

88

Reclaiming Freedoms

R

Open Source Hardware and Design Alliance by Jurge