UCD School of Law - University College Dublin

Sep 13, 2011 - towards a Masters degree or reading for a PhD). ... law and governance, commercial law, criminology, criminal justice and criminal law, legal.
235KB Sizes 0 Downloads 152 Views
UCD School of Law Library Information Resources Policy

Created 13/09/2011

Liaison Librarian: Mark Tynan 1.0 Introduction The Information Resources Policy for the UCD School of Law is designed to facilitate successful partnership between UCD Library and the School in the selection, management and promotion of information resources supporting the teaching and research interests of the School. 1.1 Application This policy will inform School and Library decision-making in recommending items for purchase or de-selection. The identification and implementation of key procedures and mechanisms will enable constructive review of existing resources as well as the selection of new resources targeted at areas of strategic growth in School teaching, learning and research. 1.2 Audience The policy is aimed at academic and research staff from the UCD School of Law and relevant staff from UCD Library. 1.3 Policy Summary This policy outlines procedures for selection, de-selection and purchase of resources. Information on the HEA-IReL initiative is provided and the range of resources, as well as the scope of the collections, available to members of the School is described. Interdisciplinary relationships between the UCD School of Law and related schools are identified and library support for resource use to promote teaching and learning opportunities are outlined. Details of the Library budget are itemised and future trends which may impact on resource provision are included. The policy will be reviewed regularly by School staff and the Liaison Librarian. 2.0 Profile of the UCD School of Law The UCD School of Law is the largest of its kind in the state and is home to approximately 50 academic and administrative staff. It has a distinguished record of academic achievement in both research and teaching, and contains a thriving community of undergraduates and graduate students (approximately 100 students are either working towards a Masters degree or reading for a PhD). Regular visits by distinguished academics and other experts from all over the world ensure that the School is kept abreast of the latest developments in legal studies. The School is also home to the Commercial Law Centre, which hosts conferences, seminars and workshops in the area of commercial law, and the Institute of Criminology. 2.1 Subject specialism’s, course offerings and staff research interests can be found on the School of Law’s website1. The main research areas can be identified as constitutional law and governance, commercial law, criminology, criminal justice and criminal law, legal history, legal systems and private law.

03/10/2011

UCD School of Law: Information Resources Policy

Guide 37

Page | 2

2.2 Other Users: Courses offered by the School have a high level of uptake among students from other disciplines across the university (as electives). There is also a high uptake by Erasmus, JYA, and visiting international students. 3.0 Scope The scope of the collection of resources will reflect the School’s teaching and research activities and resource management will be facilitated by the relationship between the School and the Liaison Librarian. 3.1 Subject Coverage Topics include Administrative Law Arbitration Law and Procedure Business Law Company Law Constitutional Law Consumer Law Corporate Finance Criminal Law Employment Law EU Law Equity Human Rights French Legal Theory International Law Land Law Law of Contract Law of Tort Law of Trusts Media Law Revenue Law Trade Marks and Patents 3.1.1 Irish Legal History: The holdings of Irish law material such as statutes, law reports and journals represent a substantial component of the Library’s collection and are of international significance. Examples include Acts of the Oireachtas from 1927, Iris Oifigiúil from 1926, Dublin Gazette from 1896-1920, Daĺl Éireann Parliamentary Debates from 1927, Irish Reports from 1839 and the Irish Law Times from 1867. 3.2 Location The majority of physical Law resources are located on Level 2 of the